Saturday, September 20, 2014
Banagrass can grow to heights of 15 feet or more as shown here at the University of Hawaii’s  Mealani Experiment Station in Kamuela, Hawaii at an elevation of 2500 feet.
Banagrass can grow to heights of 15 feet or more as shown here at the University of Hawaii’s Mealani Experiment Station in Kamuela, Hawaii at an elevation of 2500 feet.
Purple and green banagrass at 5 months after planting are both napier grasses grown in trials at the University of Hawaii’s Waimanalo Experiment Station at an elevation of 60 feet.
Purple and green banagrass at 5 months after planting are both napier grasses grown in trials at the University of Hawaii’s Waimanalo Experiment Station at an elevation of 60 feet.
Energycane at 9 months from the USDA/ARS station in Houma, Louisiana were planted in Waimanalo at 60 feet elevation and will be evaluated in trials at 3000 feet elevation in Kula, Maui.
Energycane at 9 months from the USDA/ARS station in Houma, Louisiana were planted in Waimanalo at 60 feet elevation and will be evaluated in trials at 3000 feet elevation in Kula, Maui.
Jatropha curcus, an oilseed crop, produced fruits within 6 months after planting at the Kula Agricultural Research Park on Maui. Elevation of the site is 1500 feet.
Jatropha curcus, an oilseed crop, produced fruits within 6 months after planting at the Kula Agricultural Research Park on Maui. Elevation of the site is 1500 feet.
Guinea grass and banagrass at the University of Hawaii’s Waimanalo Experiment Station.
Guinea grass and banagrass at the University of Hawaii’s Waimanalo Experiment Station.
Test plots of varieties of banagrass, a napier grass, at the University of Hawaii’s Waimanalo Experiment Station.
Test plots of varieties of banagrass, a napier grass, at the University of Hawaii’s Waimanalo Experiment Station.
 
Pause
 

Welcome



With more than 90 percent of Hawaii’s energy needs dependent on imported fossil fuels, we are particularly vulnerable to supply shortages. Unlike in years past, less than 4% of Hawaii’s petroleum consumption originates from domestic U.S. supplies; the remainder comes from foreign sources and depends increasingly on Middle Eastern sources. With rapidly escalating energy costs, negative impacts of energy importation can be expected to intensify in the future. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop local energy production capacity to improve Hawaii’s energy security and the State economy.

Parallel to this need is the mission of the national Sun Grant Initiative to grow renewable energy and biobased industries that revitalize rural communities by harnessing science and technological capacities of research, education and extension programs at the U.S. Land-Grant Universities.

Sun Grant Initiative and the Western Insular Pacific Sun Grant Sub center



The 110th Congress of the United States of America passed the “Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008,” more commonly known as the “2008 Farm Bill.” The Act contains authorization language to establish the Sun Grant Program, and authorizes the Secretary to establish and carry out a program to provide grants to the Sun Grant centers and sub center to:
• enhance national energy security through the development, distribution, and implementation of biobased energy technologies;
• promote diversification in, and the environmental sustainability of, agricultural production in the United States through biobased energy and product technologies;
• promote economic diversification in rural areas of the United States through biobased energy and product technologies; and
• enhance the efficiency of bioenergy and biomass research and development programs through improved coordination and collaboration among the Department of Agriculture; the Department of Energy; and land-grant colleges and universities.

The Act authorized five Regional Sun Grant Centers at Land-Grant institutions.
• North-Central at South Dakota State University
• Southeastern at the University of Tennessee
• South-Central at Oklahoma State University
• Western at Oregon State University
• Northeastern at Cornell University

More information on the Sun Grant Initiative can be found at http://www.sungrant.org.

The regional concept allows each center to focus on the priority areas and feedstock unique to their respective area.

The Act also authorized the Western Insular Pacific Subcenter at the University of Hawaii for the region of Alaska, Hawaii, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau.

Establishment of the Western Insular Pacific Sun Grant Subcenter at the University of Hawaii at Manoa will formally associate the University of Hawaii with the Sun Grant Initiative and provide added visibility to the University of Hawaii at Manoa as only the third US institution that can claim Land, Sea, Space and Sun Grant status. Establishment of the Subcenter will also facilitate collaboration with the other regional Sun Grant Centers.
Home   |   Research   |   Education and Outreach   |   Projects   |   Literature   |   About Us   |   News
The University of Hawai‘i is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.