HAWAII FORESTRY EXTENSION

Dr. J. B. Friday
CTAHR/ University of Hawaiʻi
Cooperative Extension Service
875 Komohana Street
Hilo, HI 96720
Telephone: (808) 969-8254
Fax: (808) 981-5211
Email: jbfriday@hawaii.edu

 

Current Forestry Research Projects

Bibilography: CTAHR forestry and agroforestry research publications since 1990

Developing productivity models and silvicultural guidelines for growing and managing the native Hawaiian hardwood Acacia koa

J. B. Friday, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, UH-CTAHR
Travis Idol, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, UH-CTAHR
Paul Scowcroft, Institute of Pacific Islands Forestry, USDA Forest Service

Dendrometer

Koa (Acacia koa) regenerates prolifically in Hawaii from buried seed banks in areas where former koa forests once stood, but the silvicultural tools for managing young koa stands have not yet been developed. Land managers need to know how to manage these young stands for some economic return while preserving the environmental value of the forest. We will develop an ecosystem-based model of koa productivity and response to silvicultural management as related to light, water, nutrients, and stand density. Our models will form the basis of decision support systems and silvicultural tools for koa reforestation and management. Better-educated landowners will be encouraged to re-establish native koa forests and actively manage existing forests.

Contact

Dr. J. B. Friday
Phone: 808-981-5199
Fax: 808-981-5221
Email: jbfriday@hawaii.edu

Funding

has been provided to CTAHR for this research from the USDA Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service Project TSTAR Project HAW00126-06G. For more information see the USDA Current Research Information System (CRIS) Website Report.

Virtual Field day video

Thinning, Fertilization and Herbicide Trials to improve Koa Production (Dr. J. B. Friday and Dr. James Leary)

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Developing Effective Silvicultural Guidelines for Productive Koa Forest Management

Travis Idol, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, UH-CTAHR

J. B. Friday, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, UH-CTAHR

Paul Scowcroft, Institute of Pacific Islands Forstry, USDA Forest Service

Koa experimental release

Acacia koa is a highly valuable timber tree that grows across a wide range of climatic conditions and soil age in Hawaii. There is some knowledge of its productivity across this range, but there is little knowledge of what silvicultural treatments - thinning, fertilizing, etc. - are best to improve productivity and meet landowner objectives. This project will address the need for site-specific productivity data and silvicultural recommendations for Acacia koa forests.

Contact

Dr. Travis Idol
Phone: 808-956-7508
Fax: 808-956-6539
Email: idol@hawaii.edu

Funding

has been provided to CTAHR for this research from the USDA Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service Project HAW00114-M. For more information see the USDA Current Research Information System (CRIS) Website Report.

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Large-Scale Assessment of Hawaiian Dry Forest Decline and Restoration Potential with Remote Sensing and GIS

Tomoaki Miura, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, UH-CTAHR
Travis Idol, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, UH-CTAHR

Puuwaawaa dryland forest

Tropical dry forests are among the most endangered and degraded ecosystems in the world. There is a great concern that Hawaii's remaining dry forest ecosystems could vanish without intensive, aggressive management and restoration efforts due to three interrelated factors: grazing, fire, and alien grass invasion. The purpose of this project is to examine the effectiveness of remote sensing and GIS in delineating areas which require intensive management.

Contact

Dr. Tomoaki Miura
Phone: 808-956-7333
Fax: 808-956-6539
Email: tomoakim@hawaii.edu

Funding

has been provided to CTAHR for this research from the USDA Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service Project HAW00124-M. For more information see the USDA Current Research Information System (CRIS) Website Report.

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Impacts of Water Pumping and Alien Species Invasion on Stream Flow

Ali Fares, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, UH-CTAHR
Tomoaki Miura, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, UH-CTAHR
Jonathan Deenik, Department of Tropical Plant and Soil Sciences, UH-CTAHR

The proposed work is intended to be a corner stone for short and long-term research activities of the watershed hydrology program at the NREM department of the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources. The main goal of this proposed work is to use Makaha Valley as a test case to develop an integrated decision support system at the watershed continuum by combining multi-scale field experiments with a strong numerical modeling and geospatial component (i.e., remote sensing and geographical information system) to help understand hydrological processes and their variability under different controlling parameters, i.e., land use (reforest/deforestation, agricultural use, urbanization) extreme weather conditions (drought, flooding).

Contact

Dr. Ali Fares
Phone: 808-956-6361
Fax: 808-956-6539
Email: afares@hawaii.edu

Funding

has been provided to CTAHR for this research from the USDA Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service Project HAW00128-06G. For more information see the USDA Current Research Information System (CRIS) Website Report.

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Willingness to Pay for Invasive Species Control Program: The Case of Miconia

Miconia

Catherine Chan-Halbrendt, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, UH-CTAHR

Damages that result from invasive species such as Miconia can be extensive and nearly every native ecosystem is threatened by potential invaders. Invasive species in Hawaii have caused quite a stir in recent years because of the massive impacts that they can have on the economy of the entire state. The State of Hawaii earns nearly a quarter of its income from tourism that is based primarily on the climate and native environment of Hawaii. An adverse impact to the environment due to invasive species is a direct loss to the tourism sector and thus to the economy and well-being of all Hawaiian interests. On a broader scale, a loss to native Hawaiian ecosystems is a loss to global biodiversity that is already suffering from catastrophic devastation. Miconia also is a threat to the productivity of the agricultural and agroforestry industries. The importance of controlling miconia is obvious. Unfortunately, there are not enough resources for complete eradication, despite the cataclysmic economic damages that are inevitable if invasions are ignored. Recognizing the scarcity of resources for management, it boils down to a question of which species are chosen for stringent control and which are treated with less vigor. Since there will always be a scarcity of resources it is crucial to find out the value of controlling Miconia relative to its current spending. The purpose of this project is to develop a framework to estimate the benefits of invasive species (Miconia) control programs.

Contact

Dr. Catherine Chan-Halbrendt
Phone: 808-956-2626
Fax: 808-956-6539
Email: chanhalb@hawaii.edu

Funding

has been provided to CTAHR for this research from the USDA Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service Project HAW00163-H. For more information see the USDA Current Research Information System (CRIS) Website Report.

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Ecosystem Structure and Function in Degraded, Restored and Intact Hawaiian Forests

Koa seedling

Creighton Litton, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, UH-CTAHR

J. B. Friday, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, UH-CTAHR

Forests ecosystems in Hawaii simultaneously sustain a $30 million yr-1 timber industry, non-timber harvest of culturally important plants, habitat for endemic biota, and a suite of ecosystem services such as watershed protection and carbon sequestration. Currently, much of Hawaii's forests are highly degraded from a long history of land-use conversion, nonnative invasive species, and/or non-sustainable timber harvesting. As a result, the goods and services that characterize these forests are missing from large portions of the landscape. Landowners state-wide are dedicating lands for forest restoration and timber improvement, but available information and successful examples are largely lacking. The restoration of forests in Hawaii provides tangible benefits to land owners in terms of future economic return on the production of some of the world's highest value hardwoods. In turn, restoration of degraded lands back to forests, with both native and nonnative species, has the potential to return a suite of important ecosystem goods and services to a highly degraded landscape. Importantly, little information exists on: 1) ecosystem structure and function of intact native Hawaiian forests (i.e., reference conditions); 2) how effective afforestation, with both native and nonnative species, is in restoring biodiversity and the structural and functional attributes characteristic of intact forests; and 3) how global change variables (e.g., invasive species, land-use change, and climate change), alone and in concert, impact biodiversity and forest ecosystem structure and function. We propose to quantify ecologically meaningful indices of biodiversity and ecosystem structure and function across a land use continuum of degraded, restored, and canopy-intact forests in Hawaii. This work will also explore the independent and interactive impacts of invasive species, land use change, and climate change on biodiversity and the provisioning of ecosystem goods and services.

Contact

Dr. Creighton Litton
Phone: 808-956-6004
Fax: 808-956-6539
Email: litton@hawaii.edu

Funding

has been provided to CTAHR for this research from the USDA Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service Project HAW00132-H. For more information see the USDA Current Research Information System (CRIS) Website Report.

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Exploration, Genetic Characterization, and Host Range Testing of Parasitoids for Biocontrol of the Erythrina Gall Wasp, Quadrastichus erythrinae Kim

Mark Wright, Department of Plant and Environmental Protection Sciences, UH-CTAHR

D. Rubinoff, Department of Plant and Environmental Protection Sciences, UH-CTAHR

R. Messing, Department of Plant and Environmental Protection Sciences, UH-CTAHR

Erythrina galls

The newly invasive Erythrina gall wasp (Quadrastichus erythrinae) has swept over and devastated both endemic and ornamental Erythrina (coral trees, wiliwili) trees throughout the islands of Hawaii. The wasp populations reach such high densities that virtually every leaf and shoot on the trees is deformed and seed production is reduced. Such intense infestations are likely to eliminate the trees, causing severe disruption to native Hawaiian ecosystems and costing millions of dollars in ornamental tree and windbreak replacement throughout the State. Furthermore, Coral trees (Erythirina spp.) are extensively planted on the US mainland, especially in southern California and the gall wasp is likely to arrive there shortly. Therefore, this is an emergency situation; Erythrina trees have not been able to sustain leaves for several months and may not survive another year of such infestation. We propose to actively evaluate as many potential biological control agents for the gall wasp as possible, working in close cooperation with the State Department of Agriculture. We will simultaneously use DNA sequence to identify the source population of the Hawaiian infestation and direct our search for biological control agents accordingly. Further, DNA sequence will be very helpful in assuring conspecific identity in these minute gall wasps, and any parasitoids we are evaluating. Theoretically, this work will allow us to evaluate possible new associations between parasitoids and the gall wasps and to monitor long-term trends and effectiveness. We will therefore determine the origin of the invasive wasps; conduct exploration for potential natural enemies of Q. erythrinae; introduce potential natural enemies into quarantine; assess their effectiveness and non-target potential (in collaboration with the Hawai'i Department of Agriculture); and make releases of appropriate natural enemies for the control of the gall wasps. Effectiveness of the wasp will be monitored following release. The quantification of the effect of the introduced biological control agent on the Erythrina gall wasp has the potential to contribute a landmark study of the effects of a biological control agent on a severely invasive species.

Contact

Dr. Mark Wright
Phone: 808-956-7670
Email: markwrig@hawaii.edu

Funding

has been provided to CTAHR for this research from the USDA Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service Project HAW01908-08G. For more information see the USDA Current Research Information System (CRIS) Report.

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Molecular Identification and Characterization of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. koae, the Causal Agent for Koa Wilt in Hawaii

Janice Uchida, Department of Plant and Environmental Protection Sciences, UH-CTAHR

Shaobin Zhong, Department of Plant and Environmental Protection Sciences, UH-CTAHR

Koa with signs of wilt

Koa (Acacia koa) is endemic to Hawaii and is the second most abundant overstory tree at mid and upper elevations. The forest industry is currently based largely on Koa and worth over 30 million. Unfortunately, koa has been plagued by a wilt of small to large trees and growers attempting to replant available land have been discouraged by the rapid loss of plants within 5 years of planting. Fusarium oxysporum has been isolated and tentatively identified as one of the pathogens associated with dying trees. At low elevations, this pathogen is believed to cause 30 to 90% mortality. This makes establishment of new koa stands nearly impossible. This project will survey the koa stands in the State to determine distribution F. oxysporum and identify areas that are free of this pathogen. This will allow growers to plant these disease free areas. Molecular methods will be developed to aid in the rapid detection of pathogenic F. oxysporum strains and to provide a method to screen soil for healthy fields.

Contact

Dr. Janice Uchida
Phone: 808-956-2827
Fax: 808-956-2832
Email: juchida@hawaii.edu
Koa Wilt Webpage

Funding

has been provided to CTAHR for this research from the USDA Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service Project HAW01910-08G. For more information see the USDA Current Research Information System (CRIS) Report.

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A DNA Barcode Database for Invasive and Native Plant Species Identification in Hawaii

Gernot Presting, Department of Molecular Biosciences & BioEngineering, UH-CTAHR

A DNA barcode framework will be constructed that will help in the rapid identification and differentiation of native and invasive plants.

Contact

Dr. Gernot Presting
Phone: 808-956-8861
Fax: 808-956-3542
Email: gernot@hawaii.edu

Funding

has been provided to CTAHR for this research from the USDA Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service Project HAW00582-08G. For more information see the USDA Current Research Information System (CRIS) Report.

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An Integrated Strategy to Restore Degraded Dry Forests in Hawaii

Travis Idol, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, UH-CTAHR

James Leary, Department of Plant and Environmental Protection Sciences, UH-CTAHR

Mamane

A vast majority of Hawaii's dry forest ecosystems have become degraded by a history of ungulate grazing and subsequent occupation of the highly invasive fountain grass (Pennisetum setaceum), especially on the island of Hawaii. Fountain grass continues to maintain dominance within our dry forest ecosystems by promoting a fire regime that other native species cannot withstand. Current research in CTAHR has identified a new, highly-effective herbicide strategy to suppress fountain grass that creates realistic opportunities for large-scale native tree restoration. Native plant establishment is still very difficult due to low precipitation and thin, rocky soils. Thus, new research in nursery management is needed for developing seedlings that can successfully adapt to these extreme site conditions.  Early success for improving survival and growth with nursery techniques has recently been demonstrated with koa (Acacia koa), including techniques in optimal fertilization and inoculation with rhizobial and mycorrhizal symbionts. Our objective is to research and develop nursery management techniques for the native tree legume mamane (Sophora chrysophylla) for outplanting in dry forest ecosystems. Mamane is one of the most important dry forest species because of its role as critical habitat for the endangered bird species palila (Loxioides bailleui). This research will be conducted within the Puu Waawaa dry forest unit of the new Hawaii Experimental Tropical Forest System established in 2007 by the USDA Forest Service. Once successful nursery management and outplanting techniques have been established, we will host a workshop and field day to demonstrate for nursery growers and restoration managers the benefits of these new options.

Contact

Dr. Travis Idol (idol@hawaii.edu)
Phone: 808-956-7508
Fax: 808-956-6539

Funding

has been provided to CTAHR for this research from the USDA Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service Project HAW00190-M. For more information see the USDA Current Research Information System (CRIS) Report.

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Independant and Interactive Impacts of Land Use Change and Temperature on Belowground Carbon Cycling

Carbon cycling research

Creighton Litton, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, UH-CTAHR

Christina P. Giardina, Institute of Pacific Islands Forestry, USDA Forest Service

Susan Crow, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa

Carbon (C) storage in the terrestrial biosphere exceeds that in the atmosphere by a factor of four, and represents a dynamic balance among C input, allocation, and loss.  This balance is being altered by climate change and land-use, with important impacts on terrestrial C storage and atmospheric CO2 levels.  However, the response of terrestrial C cycling to warming and interactions with land-use remain poorly quantified.  This study is designed to examine the impacts of rising temperature and land-use change on C input, allocation, and loss in a model study system of intact native forest and degraded pasture, where substrate type and age, precipitation, and overstory species composition are constant across an elevational gradient that corresponds to a 6°C change in mean annual temperature in the Laupahoehoe unit of the Hawai‘i Experimental Tropical Forest.  Specifically, this study is designed to examine belowground carbon cycling (flux and storage of carbon in soils) in degraded pasture vs. canopy-intact native forests across the temperature gradient.

Contact

Dr. Creighton Litton
Phone: 808-956-6004
Fax: 808-956-6539
Email: litton@hawaii.edu
URL: http://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/LittonC/research.html
National Science Foundation: http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward.do?AwardNumber=0816486

Funding

has been provided to CTAHR for this research from the USDA Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service Project HAW00188-M. For more information see the USDA Current Research Information System (CRIS) Report.

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Effects of Feral Pigs (Sus scrufa) on Water Quality and Pathogen Transport in Forested Hawaiian Watersheds

Greg Bruland, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, UH-CTAHR

Runoff plot for studying erosion from feral pigs

This McIntire-Stennis (MS) Forestry Research project involves an assessment of the role of feral pigs play in the generation and transport of the fecal indicator bacteria, Enterococci sp. Specifically, the objectives of this project are to: (1) continue to monitor sediment and nutrient loads in runoff from the paired fenced/unfenced runoff plots in the forested areas of Mānoa watershed; (2) quantify spatial and temporal variation in Enterococci in soil, runoff, and stream water; (3) determine if feral pigs increase Enterococci levels in soils and runoff; and (4) investigate correlations among slope, vegetation, soil, water quality, and Enterococci. This research involves two main hypotheses: (A) that Enterococci levels in runoff are increased by the presence of feral pigs; and (B) that Enterococci enter streams via runoff after periods of high rainfall. The project builds on previous research and will provide much needed quantitative information on the effects of feral pigs on runoff, water quality, and pathogen transport in forested Hawaiian watersheds. This research relates to MS Priority Research Area 1, to "protect, sustain, and restore Hawai'i's native forest ecosystems," Objective 1b, "forested watershed management," and the subobjective "impacts on water quality."

Contact

Dr. Greg Bruland (bruland@hawaii.edu)
Phone: 808-956-8901
Fax: 808-956-6539

FUNDING

has been provided to CTAHR for this research from the USDA Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service Project HAW00108-M. For more information see the USDA Current Research Information System (CRIS) Report.

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Development of a satellite-based Monitoring System of Tropical Forest Ecosystem Dynamics in Hawaii

Tomoaki Miura, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, UH-CTAHR

Determining seasonal and inter-annual variability of tropical forest ecosystems as well as their response to seasonal and longer-term climate variations is of great importance. In this study, we propose to investigate the utility of high temporal resolution satellite data records from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor for tropical forest ecosystem monitoring in order to develop a satellite-based, regional-scale monitoring system of tropical forest ecosystem dynamics. MODIS is a currently-operational satellite sensor that provides daily global coverage of the Earth's surface at 250 - 500 m spatial resolutions. The following are the specific objectives we wish to accomplish in this project: 1) to quantify spatial and temporal patterns in cloud cover occurrences at the moderate spatial resolution of 1 km for the whole state of Hawaii, and then to recommend and develop a temporal compositing scheme for the generation of "cloud-free" MODIS time series data over the main Hawaiian islands; 2) to develop a quantitative methodology to extract seasonality in vegetation photosynthetic activities, or "phenological metrics", from the MODIS time series data for tropical forest ecosystems; 3) to conduct seasonal field campaigns at the Hawaii Experimental Tropical Forest and use the field data to validate the MODIS-derived phenological metrics, and lastly, 4) to evaluate the effectiveness of the MODIS-derived phenological metrics by applying the metrics to drought monitoring (i.e., streamflow). Results obtained through this proposed study will provide a significant step toward the establishment of a regional-scale monitoring and analysis program of tropical vegetation with moderate resolution remote sensing.

Contact

Dr. Tomoaki Miura (tomoakim@hawaii.edu)
Phone: 808-956-7333
Fax: 808-956-6539
Email: tomoakim@hawaii.edu
URL: http://www.ctahr.hawaii.edu/miuralab/projects.html

Funding

has been provided to CTAHR for this research from the USDA Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service Project HAW00143-M. For more information see the USDA Current Research Information System (CRIS) Report.

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Protection of Wood Products from Attack by the Formosan and Asian Subterrancean Termites

Kenneth Grace, Department of Plant and Environmental Protection Sciences, UH-CTAHR

J.R. Yates, Department of Plant and Environmental Protection Sciences, UH-CTAHR

Soldier termites

The Formosan subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus, and the Asian subterranean termite, Coptotermes gestroi (formerly considered to be C. vastator), are severe pests of wood products, and at times of living plants, in the Pacific region, and are increasing in distribution globally in the tropics and subtropics. Coptotermes formosanus occurs throughout the Hawaiian Islands, and is most economically important insect pest in the state. Coptotermes gestroi was discovered in western Oahu during the past decade, and has been identified as the most significant new invasive termite in the United States. We propose novel research to determine the distribution of C. gestroi on Oahu, its wood preferences and foraging patterns, and the appropriate conditions for evaluation of wood products against this invasive pest species. We will also evaluate and assist in the development of new termite resistant preservative treatments and engineered wood products (containing both durable wood species and preservative treatments) for use and for manufacture in Hawaii. Thus, this project addresses both a serious ongoing need for wood protection in Hawaii, and a novel and increasing threat to both Hawaii (and the Pacific region) and the southern portion of the continental United States.

Contact

Dr. Kenneth Grace (kennethg@hawaii.edu)
Phone: 808-956-6737
Fax: 808-956-2428
URL: http://www2.hawaii.edu/~entomol

Funding

has been provided to CTAHR for this research from the USDA Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service Project HAW00946-M. For more information see the USDA Current Research Information System (CRIS) Report.

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Identification of Koa Wilt Resistance through Disease Screening and Chitinase Gene Expression

Dulal Borthakur, Department of Molecular Biosciences & BioEngineering, UH-CTAHR

Ohia rust

The overall goal of this project is to increase survival and productivity of koa (Acacia koa), the most important leguminous tree in Hawaiian forests. In addition to providing high value timber, koa plays a vital role in Hawaii's watershed ecosystem, serving as habitat for endangered birds and epiphytic plants. One major reason for the rapid decline of koa in recent years has been tree infection by Fusarium oxysporum sp. f. koae, the fungal pathogen that causes koa wilt disease. Our recent survey covering 14,000 acres identified Fusarium infection in 48% of koa samples. Continued decline in forest health due to this disease will have severe environmental and economic impacts, such as losses in bird and plant habitat and a decrease in high value hardwood production. Chitinases produced by trees can inhibit fungal infection by degrading chitin in the fungal cell wall, and high levels of chitinase in leguminous trees have been shown to inhibit fungal growth. Expression levels of chitinase genes can be used as a biochemical or genetic marker for screening koa families for resistance to Fusarium infection. The specific objectives of this project are: 1) identification of different fungal types that cause koa wilt disease; 2) development of a greenhouse-based screening method for resistant koa families; and 3) determining expression levels of chitinase genes in resistant and susceptible koa families using quantitative real-time PCR (polymerase chain reaction) method. Koa families that are resistant to virulent fungal strains are expected to show high chitinase gene expression. High levels of chitinase expression used as a molecular method of identifying resistant families of koa will lead to decreased losses from koa wilt disease, and selection of superior koa genotypes for use in plantation forestry, preservation of critical habitats, and future breeding programs.

Contact

Dr. Dulal Borthakur (dulal@hawaii.edu)
Phone: 808-956-6600
Fax: 808-956-3542

Funding

has been provided to CTAHR for this research from the USDA Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service Project HAW00590-M. For more information see the USDA Current Research Information System (CRIS) Report.

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Identification of Genetic Markets to Improve Disease Tolerance in Acacia Koa

Susan C. Miyasaka, Department of Tropical Plant and Soil Sciences, UH-CTAHR

James L. Brewbaker, Department of Tropical Plant and Soil Sciences, UH-CTAHR

Janice Uchida, Department of Plant and Environmental Protection Sciences, UH-CTAHR

Koa selection Ayami Wang

In 2001, the total value of the Hawai`i forest industry was $30.7 million, with sales of koa (Acacia koa) having a value of 75% of all Hawai`i-grown wood products (Friday, 2006). A koa wilt disease was first observed in young seedlings at Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park (HVNP) in 1980 and the causal pathogen was identified to be Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. koae. Since that time, the severity of the disease has increased and mature stands along the Mauna Loa Strip area of HVNP are experiencing die-back, apparently due to F. oxysporum f. sp. koae. Significant differences were observed in tolerance to koa wilt among 200 families (half-sibling seeds from single mother trees) of koa were planted at the Hamakua station (650 m elevation) on the Island of Hawai`i. The overall objective of this project is to identify genetic markers in koa associated with improved koa wilt tolerance. Specifically, we propose to select koa families that differed most in tolerance to koa wilt based on earlier studies, germinate seeds, and challenge young seedlings with F. oxysporum f. sp. koae. Then, we will select those koa families that are confirmed to differ most in tolerance to koa wilt and utilize bulked-segregant analysis to target the genomic regions of koa associated with F. oxysporum-tolerant quantitative trait loci (QTLs). We will develop sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers, and these markers will be validated by analyzing the segregating population of koa families. The practical applications of this research are that foresters will be able to select seeds from families demonstrated to be more tolerant to koa wilt, and/ or to test young seedlings for tolerance to koa wilt prior to planting.

Contact

Dr. Susan Miyasaka (miyasaka@hawaii.edu)
Phone: 808-981-8264
Fax: 808-981-4518

Funding

has been provided to CTAHR for this research from the USDA Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service Project HAW00803-M. For more information see the USDA Current Research Information System (CRIS) Report.

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Conjoint Choice Analysis of Stakeholders' Management Preferences for In-stream Flow Attributes in Watersheds of Hawaii

Catherine Chan-Halbrendt, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, UH-CTAHR

As a basic human need and right, clean fresh water resources are paramount in societal development and wellbeing. Burgeoning urbanization and water demand in Hawaii are increasing competition for freshwater resources in developing urban, open space, agricultural and forestry areas. Much of the water comes from perennial streams. Forest areas and watersheds buffer the flashy nature of Hawaii hydrology including nutrient uptake and erosion. Potential changing of instream flow patterns from competing users will likely have significant impacts on the health and integrity of the stream and watershed. The three dimensions often cited in contemporary policy of sustainable resources - ecologic viability, economic integrity and social acceptance - should be considered in any valuation of fresh water resources to account for various stakeholder needs and to meet the challenges of sustainability. This study will attempt to identify stakeholder preferences for instream flow at various water levels of three different watersheds: a developed (urban), developing (agricultural and rural), and undeveloped (forested stream). Watershed possibilities include Waipio watershed on Hawaii, Manoa watershed on Oahu and Iao watershed on Maui. Stakeholder preference of resource management is a key component in the success of any project. Many watersheds in Hawaii are under the jurisdiction of the Water Commission who upholds the important Public Trust mandate for water in Hawaii. Conjoint Choice Experiment (CCE) methodology will be used to determine public preference for instream flow levels. Choice experiments have important advantages over other environmental valuation methods. Including, that they are able to describe the instream flow management programs in terms of the individual environmental and cost attributes (e.g. stream flow, remediation, invasive species, forest health) and their attribute levels (e.g. stream level, remediation cost, percent invasive species spread, etc.). Through face-to-face interviews we ask the respondents on their choices of preferred hypothetical instream flow programs with varying attribute levels. With the collected data, latent class analysis will be used to find the preferred instream flow program profiles, the relative importance of the attributes and willingness to pay various stream levels and their associated benefits. Results will allow scientists, policy decision-makers, and watershed managers to design appropriate instream flow standards and management plans. This project supports CTAHR Strategic Goal #3: Protect and Enhance the Environment and Hawaii Resources.

Contact

Dr. Catherine Chan-Halbrendt (chanhalb@hawaii.edu)
Phone: 808-956-2626
Fax: 808-956-6539
Email: chanhalb@hawaii.edu

Funding

has been provided to CTAHR for this research from the USDA Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service Project HAW00116-M. For more information see the USDA Current Research Information System (CRIS) Report.

PAST Forestry Research Information

Bibilography: CTAHR forestry and agroforestry research publications since 1990

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