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2014


April



No Pain (Blockers), No Gain

4/16/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Chris SugaiMBBE MS student Chris Sugai has accepted an 8-month, all-expenses-paid internship in analytical development at Merck KGaA in Germany, where he will be purifying new chemical entities to eliminate variables as part of the testing process for new drugs in development. Afterward, he hopes to find a job there or elsewhere in Germany or another European country—after growing up on the Big Island, he says, he is ready to see more of the world. Chris comes from an old coffee-growing family—his grandfather and great-grandfather were growers in Kona—and the family is now having its run-ins with the coffee berry borer. His father broke with tradition to attend medical school in Hawai‘i and become a pediatrician, however, and Chris wants to follow in his father’s footsteps and help others, though he prefers the lab to the doctor’s office. He plans to return to school for his PhD in neuroscience after gaining some practical experience; after all, as he points out, the work he is doing in JP Bingham’s lab for his MS is itself neuroscience, studying the effects of pain blockers on the nervous system. Chris was also awarded a 2013 GSO research award, and is using the information gained from that research for his Master’s thesis. We can’t wait to see what he’ll do in his additional scholarly pursuits!

How to Build a Toxin

4/16/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Chino CabaltejaChino Cabalteja (MBBE master’s student) was awarded the 2014 UHM Student Excellence in Research Award for his work in JP Bingham’s lab with conotoxins, poisons produced by cone snails that it is now possible to recreate in the lab. Chino explains that conotoxins are small peptides that can be formulated, amino acid by amino acid, but that an interesting discovery arising from his research is that human-made conotoxins have different configurations than those that are created naturally by the snails. It was this discovery that led to his award. Chino will be recognized at a UH Manoa awards ceremony on April 30 at 2:30 p.m. at the Orvis Auditorium and, with the rest of the CTAHR award winners, at the Awards Banquet on May 9. This wasn’t the only award for Chino, who’s known amongst his student colleagues as the lab superstar; he also won an award at last year’s CTAHR Research Symposium for best poster by a master’s student, also on the subject of peptides, and was awarded a travel stipend to attend several conferences. Chino will be attending the University of Pittsburgh’s prestigious PhD program in the fall, but when he’s earned his doctorate, he wants to come back to Hawai‘i. Originally from the Philippines, he grew up on Kaua‘i, where he says there wasn’t much in the way of science enrichment education. That situation is now changing thanks to such programs as the Kaua‘i Gene-ius Day program, which a cousin of his attended and loved, and he wants to be part of that change. Kaua‘i’s science community will be fortunate to have him!

April Showers? Let’s Garden!

4/16/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


A lovely home gardenJulia Zee (HNFAS) recently posted her article “April showers—and a little gardening—bring May flowers” at the healthy lifestyle blog being808. Julia’s upbeat article celebrates April as National Gardening Month, and encourages the involvement of youngsters in the garden with creative containers like empty milk jugs and fun games that show how many parts of plants we eat. She also has great tips for beginning gardeners.

A Duo of Fun Events in Pictures

4/16/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Image from the Maui Agricultural Festival and Urban Garden CenterCheck out images from two great CTAHR events. Agriculture enthusiasts enjoyed the fun, fabulous, Maui Agricultural Festival and Centennial Extension Service celebration. And schoolchildren and rose lovers celebrated peace and heroes at the lovely dedication ceremony for the Urban Garden Center’s new rose gardens.

Convocation Invocation

4/16/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Convocation imageFriendly reminder! There’s still time to RSVP for the CTAHR Spring 2014 Graduation Convocation—the deadline is Friday, April 18. Please use the online form. Some questions will not apply to you, but just fill in the first four questions and hit submit! Your attendance on May 7, 5:30 to 7:00 p.m. at the Campus Center Ballroom, will help our graduating students celebrate their academic achievements. The evening will include an intimate graduation ceremony, presentation of our graduates, refreshments, lots of pride and goodwill, and maybe a few sentimental tears. Visit the website for more information and the online RSVP form.

Peep-orama!

4/16/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Peeps ArtGet out your shoeboxes and marshmallowy treats! PEPS—or is that PE(e)PS?—is hosting a Peeps Diorama Competition, Friday, May 2. Diorama submission is 1 to 4 p.m. in Gilmore 611; pau hana and judging are at 4:00 p.m. in the Gilmore courtyard. Presentations (original ideas only, please!) can be submitted as a single or group entry, and everyone is invited to participate. All entries will be judged, and prizes will be awarded to the winners, but the food and drinks at the pau hana are for everyone! Participants will need to procure their own Peeps and Peeps world building supplies. If you are interested in flexing your Peep creativity, please email the Ka Mea Kolo club at kameakolo@gmail.com. Check out more examples of Peeps dioramas here. Go forth, and get your Peeps on!

A Whole Range of Talents

4/16/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Marla Fergerstrom with a calfCongratulations to Mealani Research Station’s Marla Fergerstrom, recipient of the 2014 UH Manoa Chancellor’s Award for Outstanding Service! Marla is invaluable to the ranching community, as well as to CTAHR, for her dedication to improving the herd and for keeping everything on track at the Mealani Research Station, from the livestock to the blueberry and tea plantations to the always fabulous Mealani’s Taste of the Hawaiian Range. The Manoa Chancellor’s Award for Outstanding Service honors staff members who demonstrate outstanding work performance, service, and leadership. Marla will be honored with the other Chancellor’s Award winners Wednesday, April 30, 2:30 p.m. in Orvis Auditorium, as well as at the Awards Banquet on May 9 along with all of the other illustrious members of the CTAHR ‘ohana. Marla was also honored in 2012 with CTAHR’s award for Outstanding Civil Service. And it’s clear her little friend thinks she’s pretty special, too!

Eat Your Biotech

4/16/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


PapayasHNFAS presents the workshop “Communicating the Science of Food & Agricultural Biotechnology” on Friday, May 2, from 5 to 7 p.m. in Ag Sci 219. The workshop includes an introduction to food biotechnology; what the science says about its safety and benefits; environmental, food safety, and nutritional impacts of food production; consumer perceptions of food biotechnology; improving the sustainability of our food supply; ensuring continued access to food as the world population grows; overview of the IFIC Foundation communicator’s guide on food biotechnology; and an interactive discussion with science and nutrition experts. Space is limited, so please RSVP early! For more information, contact Jinan Banna (HNFAS) at jcbanna@hawaii.edu or 956-7857.

Nalo Hale

4/16/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Ted Radovich with schoolchildren at the Waimanalo Research StationTops are important. Just think: an umbrella without a top is just a stick. A bikini without a top is a wardrobe malfunction! A jug of milk without a top is a big mess. And the Waimanalo On-Farm Learning Pavilion without a roof can’t provide needed shelter to the many community members, CTAHR students, schoolchildren, and workshop participants who visit the Waimanalo Research Station. That’s the situation right now, and that’s why the Station has put up a campaign on the crowdfunding site Indiegogo to raise money so they can raise the roof! And now they need supporters in CTAHR to raise some buzz about the campaign. Know anyone who wants to donate (even a few dollars) to a worthy cause? Point them in the direction of Waimanalo! There’s a little more than a month left on the campaign, plenty of time to get some shelter on the pavilion.

The App Heard ’Round the World

4/16/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Map of Plant Doctor usersCheck out the user locations for The Plant Doctor smartphone app—Indonesia to Iceland, South Africa to Sweden! Since January 2013, the free plant pest diagnostic app has been used by growers around the globe. The Plant Doctor provides interactive diagnosis and advice about plant diseases in gardens, landscapes, nurseries, and farms. Download The Plant Doctor in English and Spanish, and get with the worldwide phenomenon!

Congratulations, Awesome Awardees!

4/10/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Awards Banquet logoCTAHR proudly announces the 2014 recipients of awards for exceptional performance and service. Faculty, staff, and student awardees (drumroll, please):
  • Excellence in Teaching, Christopher Lepczyk, associate professor, NREM
  • Excellence in Research, Gernot Presting, associate professor, MBBE
  • Excellence in Extension, Michael DuPonte, county extension agent, Komohana
  • Outstanding Service by an APT Employee, Lisa Kitagawa-Akagi, student services specialist, OASA
  • Outstanding Civil Service, Deborah Wong, secretary, NREM
  • Alvin T. and Charlotte C. Nakamura “Hoku” Award for demonstrated commitment and leadership potential, Ashley Stokes, associate professor, HNFAS
  • Ka Pouhana “Mentor” Award, Mark Segobiano, instructor, HNFAS
  • Ka Hana Po‘okela Award for undergraduate contributions to a student organization and/or the community, Jay Gibson, FSHN major.
  • 2014 UH Manoa Chancellor’s Citation for Meritorious Teaching Award, Loriena Yancura, associate professor, FCS
  • Recipients will be honored at CTAHR’s 26th Annual Awards Banquet, Friday, May 9 at the Ala Moana Hotel, along with student scholarship recipients and top Student Research Symposium winners, Outstanding Alumnus Thomas Lumpkin, and Ka Lei Hano awardee Derek Kurisu. Deadline to RSVP is April 24. More information and online registration are available at the Awards Banquet website, or use this form for group seating or mixed faculty and student reservations.

    He Talks to the Animals

    4/10/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Eric Ako talks to CTAHR studentsIt’s always heartening to hear about alumni doing well. Dr. Eric Ako (BS AnSc 1978), who spoke to CTAHR students at a career workshop in March, has certainly been doing a lot since his graduation! Here’s a peek into his many activities and honors, and the mentors who helped him to get where he’s at. First of all, he’d like to acknowledge Professor Emeritus Allen Y Miyahara and Professor Bob Nakamura, whom he identifies as the main mentors for many veterinary students in the ’70s and ’80s. Prof. Miyahara sent him to Purdue, where he was a member of the veterinary honor society Phi Zeta, was awarded the AAHA Clinical Proficiency in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery Award, and was the first Hawai‘i grad to earn his DVM. Since then he’s given back to the community through his association with numerous veterinary and animal-oriented organizations, including being past president of the Honolulu Veterinary Society, the Hawaii Veterinary Medical Association, and the Honolulu Zoological Society; past chair of the Board of Veterinary Examiners of the state of Hawai‘i and past chair of UH IBC; a board member of the Hawaiian Humane Society; the co-founder and advisor for the WCC VT Program; and the Hawai‘i liaison of the Association of Avian Veterinarians. And he’s still executive vice president of the Hawaii Veterinary Medical Association! But just to show that his interests aren’t simply one-sided (or four-footed), he’s also the recipient of the Distinguished Rifleman Badge of the Civilian Marksmanship Program. Way to take aim on a career from CTAHR!

    Just as Good as Activated Sludge!

    4/10/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Lutgarde Raskin presenting a lectureLutgarde Raskin will present the seminar "Energy Recovery from Domestic Wastewater Using Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactor" on Thursday, April 10, 10:30 in Ag Sci 219. Dr. Raskin is an internationally recognized researcher in the field of environmental biotechnology, especially in the use of advanced molecular techniques for microbial community analysis. Anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) technology has emerged as a potentially eco-efficient domestic wastewater treatment strategy, and her experimental research has demonstrated that AnMBR can produce an effluent quality comparable to activated sludge processes even at relatively low temperatures (15°C).

    Support for Farmers

    4/10/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    FarmlandCome up to Kunia for the O‘ahu Farmers Resource Workshop, Friday, April 11, 5:00–9:00 p.m. at the Hawai‘i Agriculture Research Center on Kunia Road. CTAHR and state and federal programs will present the services they offer to local commercial farmers. Topics include pesticide resistance, food safety coaching, pesticide calculations, insurance programs, HDOH produce testing, loan programs and disaster assistance, clean water permits, conservation programs, and HDOA marketing and commodity programs. You’ll also get a chance to scope out the fabulous new pesticide education poster that’s the brainchild of Jim Hollyer and his crew of on-farm food safetyists. Come and learn about the many new and exciting updates on the road to building Hawai‘i’s diversified agriculture industry together. Last year’s workshop was so successful, the line was out the door! For more information or to RSVP, contact Steve Russo at (808) 973-9409 or Steve.Russo@Hawaii.Gov.

    Get Your Research On!

    4/10/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Student Research Symposium imagesStudents will be struttin' their research stuff on Friday and Saturday, April 11 and 12, at the Student Research Symposium in the Agriculture Sciences building. This annual event brings together graduate and undergraduate students to share the research they are pursuing under the supervision of faculty in CTAHR and the College of Engineering. The students are able to present their findings, exchange information, and incorporate what they’ve learned from their peers into their own scholarly work, and the top winners will be recognized at the CTAHR Awards Banquet. This year's SRS will feature around 130 oral and poster presentations, spanning fundamental investigations to novel applications and encompassing engineering, production agriculture, environmental technologies, health and food sciences, family and consumer sciences, and natural sciences. Poster sessions run 3:00 to 5:30 p.m. on Friday, with oral presentations 8:15 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Saturday. For more information and this year’s program, visit the Student Research Symposium website. Come support CTAHR students and their awesome research!

    Helping the Hungry

    4/10/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Food Bank logoGet ready to give! This year marks the 25th Anniversary of the Hawai‘i Foodbank Annual Food Drive, and once again we ask for your help. Over the years, CTAHR has formed a proud tradition of contributing generously to the food drive. Please help us surpass last year's exceptional showing. Marietta Escobar-Solis (OCS) is the contact for CTAHR Administrative Offices and the CTAHR unit/dept. coordinators. Please contact your department coordinator for information about where to bring monetary donations and canned goods for your department. Checks are preferred, payable to Hawai‘i Foodbank, but you can also give by Electronic Fund Transfer (EFT). Food and monetary donations will be accepted until April 25. And don’t forget to get a 25th Anniversary T-shirt! T-shirts must be individually ordered and paid for online and will be shipped by the Foodbank directly to the purchaser. When ordering, please select "State of Hawai‘i Coalition" from the drop-down menu. Then in the comments section, please type in your department/unit name. This way, your T-shirt orders will be credited to your department or unit. Print a copy of the confirmation for Marietta. Thanks for doing your part to combat hunger and maintain our tradition of service. For more information, contact Marietta at 956-7036 or ocs@ctahr.hawaii.edu.

    Get Healthy!

    4/10/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Alan Titchenal and Joannie DobbsHealth starts with a healthy mindset, so check out three new Health Options articles by Alan Titchenal and Joannie Dobbs (both HNFAS). Their March 11 article focuses on iron deficiency, the symptoms, and how to incorporate more iron into your diet. On March 25, they explored the consequences of labeling food “good” and “bad,”particularly fats and cholesterol. And their most recent article encourages consumers to enjoy locally-grown vegetables. Go get these articles and other healthy tips on the Health Options website!

    Plants of Yesteryear, Seeds of Tomorrow

    4/10/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Students learning about seedsWith funding support from CTAHR, students in TPSS 421 Tropical Seed Science had the opportunity to visit the USDA National Resource Conservation Service station on Moloka‘i to learn about the production of native plant seeds for conservation and roadside planting and restoration of vegetation on Kaho‘olawe. Accompanied by their instructor, Richard Criley (TPSS), the students learned about the challenges of producing quantities of seeds of native species for which there was no previous experience. They saw field plantings of ‘a‘ali‘i, ‘ilima, ‘uhaloa, and pili grass, which are among target species for roadside planting to reduce erosion and maintenance in programs such as those initiated by Joe DeFrank (TPSS) and his students. Hosts Glenn Sakamoto and Kawika Duvachelle demonstrated seed-cleaning equipment such as threshers, shakers, and screens, as well as aspirators to extract seed from previously collected seedheads. Additional research at the station is concerned with the use of native plants as resources for pollinators such as bees, flies, and other insects. CTAHR is privileged to have emeritus faculty like Richard who continue to contribute to the college in retirement!

    What Lies Beneath...the Soil

    4/10/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Ray Uchida on KHONCES Agriculture Diagnostic Service Center Manager Ray Uchida recently appeared on KHON to offer his expertise on the soil contaminants found at Radford High School. Work on an all-weather track around the football field was halted in December when toxic chemicals were found buried under the campus, and testing revealed lead, arsenic, cadmium, and mercury in the soil. Because the chemicals were found two to three feet below the surface, the high levels are considered safe, but Ray still recommends caution, particularly about the lead. “I would be concerned with it because you don’t know what might happen if you scrape it off, but it won’t move upward,” he said. Watch the video at the KHON website.

    Maui Ag-Tastic!

    4/10/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    CTAHR people enjoying the Maui Agricultural FestivalMaui residents and visitors alike learned about the array of CTAHR programs at the 2014 Maui Agricultural Festival at Maui Tropical Plantation. Highlights included the events celebrating the Centennial of Cooperative Extension. The Green Valley Clovers 4-H Club brought the Centennial Passport Scavenger Hunt to life, encouraging participants to learn more about CTAHR programs for agricultural businesses, home gardeners, and families. Cooperative Extension exhibits included Pest of the Hour, Master Gardeners, fruit fly management, the Weed Doctor, Aging with Dignity, the Maui Educational Apiary Project, 4-H, the Sustainable and Organic Agricultural Program (SOAP), Nutrition Education for Wellness (NEW), and the Maui Cooperative Extension Centennial timeline. In addition to the CTAHR CES bonanza, Maui Agricultural Research Center (MARC) showcased their breeding work with taro and Protea family plants, offering plant material and expert advice on how to cultivate these plants in gardens and farms as well as cooked samples of selected taro varieties (and yes, they had the required temporary food permit). Then, for people interested in our academic programs, who better to ask than Charly Kinoshita, who offered his encouragement and expertise? A big mahalo to everyone who helped make this an Ag Fesitval success!

    Everyone Loves a (Science) Fair

    4/10/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Lily Jenkins and Brent Sipes at the 2014 Science FairThis year 11 generous CTAHR faculty and graduate students volunteered as judges in the 57th Hawaii State Science and Engineering Fair, April 1 and 2, at the Hawaii Convention Center. Jinan Banna (HNFAS), Rajesh Jha (HNFAS), Soojin Jun (HNFAS), Hye-Ji Kim (TPSS), Associate Dean Charles Kinoshita, Kent Kobayashi (TPSS), Robert Paull (TPSS), Nora Robertson (MBBE), Brent Sipes (PEPS), Brian Turano (TPSS), and Russell Yost (TPSS) all got to marvel at the accomplishments of hundreds of Hawai‘i’s best and brightest middle- and high-school students. With funding from USDA-NIFA, CTAHR presented a $500 award on behalf of all campuses in the UH system to Lily Jenkins (pictured with Brent Sipes), a 9th-grader at Molokai High and Intermediate School, who presented findings from her research project, “Ecological Effects of Non-Native Vegetation at Man-Made Canal at Pukuo‘o, Molokai.” Concerned about the sediment accumulating in the pond across the street from her home, Lily embarked on a 12-month effort of observation, sampling, and data analysis of the water, plants, and sediment in the pond. Based on her research, she concluded that the invasive vegetation found in Puko‘o Canal is a contributing factor to stream-flow blockage and sedimentation. Lily presently is working with the landowner to develop a plan to remove the invasive species and restore the pond. The CTAHR Alumni Association also presented $100 awards to two high school students at the Fair. Mahalo to the many CTAHR faculty, staff, and students who generously mentored the next generation of scientists and engineers participating in this year’s Fair!

    Business Model for AquaFarmers

    4/10/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Donna “Sweetie” Kuehu and Avery LauAvery Lau and Donna “Sweetie” Kuehu (NREM) are competing in the Howard G. Buffett Foundation and the University of Wisconsin-Madison 2014 Agricultural Innovation Prize, where teams vie for the chance to win $215,000 in prize money, with a grand prize of $100,000. Their ag innovation plan entry is for Hawaii AquaSeed & Distribution Company LLC (HADCO), a company conceived in ANSC 490 then established by Donna specifically for the competition. HADCO’s mission is to grow AquaFarmers by implementing its agriculture/aquaculture food system business model, which removes barriers and obstacles for small to medium-size operations, resulting in sustainable production of a fresh and nutritious food supply. The competition has narrowed down to the top 30 teams, including the HADCO team, which have been invited to participate in the semi-final and final rounds at the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Wisconsin Institute of Discovery on April 25 and 26. Please read HADCO’s business abstract and support the team by “liking” it on Facebook. The team with the most “like” votes will be eligible for an Audience Choice Prize. Your vote makes a difference, so please vote. Voting runs until April 24th. Go for it, Donna and Avery!

    Bees, Gardeners, and More

    4/2/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Haku lei image from the Grow Hawaiian FestivalCome join the UH Honeybee Project and the O‘ahu Master Gardeners at the Grow Hawaiian Festival, Saturday, April 5, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the Bishop Museum. The free event, a celebration of Hawai‘i’s culture, native plants, and sustainability, offers the whole family a day filled with activities, crafts, games, music, and food. Learn how to promote bee health in Hawai‘i with Ethel Villalobos (PEPS) of the UH Honeybee Project, and learn to grow native plants with the O‘ahu Master Gardeners. Watch the KITV video of Ethel’s tips for residents that can help the bee population. Check out all the events at the Grow Hawaiian Festival website and bring the whole family down for a good time!

    Testing the Waters

    4/2/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Water quality testing suppliesClyde Tamaru and RuthEllen Klinger-Bowen (both MBBE) will present the Aquaponic Water Quality Workshop on Saturday, April 12, 9:00 a.m. to 12 noon at the Hale Tuahine CTAHR Aquaponic Laboratory as part of the centennial celebration of Cooperative Extension. This course, for beginner aquaculturists and those maintaining aquaponics systems, is a three-hour combination lecture and hands-on training course, utilizing commercially available water test kits and actual water from operating aquaponics systems. At the conclusion of this workshop participants will be able to measure and determine basic water-quality parameters of pH, temperature, total ammonia nitorgen (TAN), nitrite, nitrate, and dissolved oxygen (DO) in an aquaponic system; use data obtained to assess the operating condition of an aquaponic system; make adjustments and optimize system water quality and performance; demonstrate mastery of basic water-quality parameters by using testing kits to accurately obtain data; identify and explain the nitrification cycle and water quality tests associated with maintaining a healthy aquaponics system environment for fish and plants. The registration fee is $39.95, with a discounted fee of $26.00 for Hawaii Aquaculture and Aquaponics Association members. There are only five seats left, so register now!

    Millions of Moth Years

    4/2/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Hyposmocoma caterpillar casingsWill Haines and Dan Rubinoff (both PEPS) and Patrick Schmitz, formerly of PEPS as well, are taking a look back into the past with the moth genus Hyposmocoma, otherwise known as the Hawaiian fancy case caterpillar for the elaborate silk cases the larvae construct and carry on their backs. In their new study “Ancient diversification of Hyposmocoma moths in Hawai‘i” published in Nature Communications, the team shows that Hyposmocoma have been in Hawai‘i for about 15 million years, contrary to previous studies that suggested that the majority of organisms colonized the islands 5 million years ago. They show that Hyposmocoma has dispersed from the remote Northwestern Hawaiian Islands to the current high islands more than 20 times, something that has never been shown in another Hawaiian animal or plant group. Read the news release or peruse the article at the Nature Communications website.

    Bountiful Banquet

    4/2/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Awards Banquet logoThe 26th Annual Awards Banquet will honor exceptional CTAHR ‘ohana, May 9, at the Ala Moana Hotel Hibiscus Ballroom. Cocktails start at 5:30 p.m. and dinner is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. International agronomist Dr. Thomas Lumpkin will be honored as an Outstanding Alumnus and Hawai‘i food industry executive Derek Kurisu as the Ka Lei Hano Award winner, along with CTAHR scholarship recipients and student and faculty award winners. The event also provides an opportunity to honor college benefactor and veteran plant breeder James Brewbaker and recognize the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Cooperative Extension Service. For more information, visit the Awards Banquet website. The RSVP deadline is April 24, so register online, by mail or in person today! Can’t wait to see you there!

    Ce-le-brate Good (Extension) Times!

    4/2/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Cooperative Extension Centennial logoTake a look at the great outreach work done by the CTAHR ‘ohana at the new CTAHR CES Centennial website! In 1914, the Smith Lever Act was passed, and this year marks 100 years of Cooperative Extension in the U.S. Although outreach work had been going on in Hawai‘i for years, the University of Hawai‘i officially established the Cooperative Extension Service in 1928, and it’s been going strong ever since. You can also keep up with Centennial updates with the CTAHR CES twitter feed. Here's to the first 100 years, and many more in the future of Cooperative Extension!

    Open House Success!

    4/2/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Visitors learn about CTAHR projects at Poamoho Research StationThe Poamoho Research Station held a successful Plant Propagation and Crop Nutrition Open House on March 29. Participants got to check out the great variety of crops at the station including lettuce, papaya, bananas, tea, and more. They also got to learn about organic, sustainable growing, and fertilizer, as well as hydroculture and other CTAHR projects. As the “price” of admission, they also were videotaped wishing Cooperative Extension a Happy 100th Birthday! See more pictures of the awesome event as well as the beautiful produce at the station, and watch the video of Jensen Uyeda (TPSS) talking about the event on Hawai‘i News Now. An extra mahalo to retirees Dot Higashi (CES) and Ken Takeda and Steve Fukuda (both TPSS) who came out to help!

    Oh, Happy (Ag) Day!

    4/2/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Visitors at an Agriculture Awareness Day displayAs part of the 100-year Anniversary of Cooperative Extension, CTAHR celebrated Ag Day at the Capitol on March 28. Dean Maria Gallo and CTAHR alumni Dennis Gonsalves and Chris Robb participated in the Agricultural Coexistence panel discussion that focused on how organic farming and biotechnology fit in the modern agricultural landscape in Hawai‘i. CTAHR programs—Sustainable and Organic Agriculture (SOAP), Local and Immigrant Farmer Education (LIFE), Nutrition Education for Wellness (NEW), and the UH Honeybee Project—contributed displays and demonstrations for the public to view and experience. Check out more images of Agriculture Awareness Day. Great job, everyone!

    Basic, Strange, and Landmark

    4/2/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Dr. B smiling in a corn fieldSometimes breakthroughs in research come from unexpected places, and the American Journal of Botany has recognized Dr. B's non-traditional work. “When I was a kid in the 60’s, CTAHR’s Department of Horticulture not only allowed my lab to ‘play with pollen’ but let me nurture several grads through without obvious application to problems of Hawai‘i farmers,” Dr. B remembers. Fast-forward 50+ years, and the 100th anniversary volume of the American Journal of Botany reviewed the landmark contributions to pollen evolution research that came from Dr. B’s “basic, but strange” work, including the evolutionary law named after him, the Brewbaker-Schurhoff law. Read more at the American Journal of Botany website.

    March



    Nalo Kala

    3/31/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    The Waimanalo Research Station has just launched a crowdsourcing campaign to raise funds to build a roof to complete the construction of an On-Farm Learning Pavilion, and everyone is asked to spread the word about this great initiative! Since their original classroom collapsed in a 2011 storm, the station has been using temporary tents to provide a venue for their increasing number of classes and workshops and shelter for visitors. Partial funding has been granted by the Castle Foundation, O‘ahu County, and a CTAHR capacity-building grant, but $30,000 more is needed. And the campaign, hosted on the Indiegogo website, is already garnering support for its goal. Go, Waimanalo!

    Coffee Outlaw

    3/31/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Emaravirus lesions on coffeeThere’s a new pest in town, but sheriffs Scot Nelson and Mike Melzer (PEPS) and Andrea Kawabata (TPSS) are donning their badges and rounding up the posse to make sure it doesn’t get too comfortable. The latest crop bad guy, which has not been reported anywhere else in the world as yet, was discovered on the Big Island in January 2014 through Scot’s Plant Doctor app. It creates lesions on the leaves and petioles of coffee and reportedly renders the cherries unmarketable, though much still needs to be learned about it. Check out more pictures of the intruder at the website Scot has created to monitor it, and report any sightings there or to Scot at snelson@hawaii.edu. Also see Scot’s interview on the pest on KITV.

    Research in the News

    3/31/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Kamehameha butterfluPEPS’s Dan Rubinoff and William Haines’s citizen science-powered Pulelehua Project has captured the imagination of many as it seeks to capture images and locations of the elusive, iconic Kamehameha butterfly. The latest shout-out to the project comes from Kaunana Magazine, a compilation of UH-Manoa research news, which posted a video and description of the project. Nor is this CTAHR’s only recent mention in the magazine, which also features MBBE’s Dan Jenkins and the half-million-dollar grant he received to create and refine hand-held technology to detect Salmonella and other harmful bacteria quickly in crops growing in the field. CTAHR research—it has roots and wings!

    Ag-Aware Out There

    3/31/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Students at CTAHR Ag and Environmental Awareness DayAbout 600 fifth-grade students and teachers attended the 2014 Agriculture and Environmental Awareness Day on March 7 out at the Pearl City Urban Garden Center. The purpose of this yearly outdoor event is to create a greater awareness and understanding of agriculture and the environment among today’s youth, teachers, and general public, as well as to introduce young students to potential Hawai‘i-based career opportunities in these fields. University faculty, staff, and students; government agencies; private industry; and community members volunteered their time to educate the students with 16 presentations and 12 interactive exhibits. Several exhibitors returned the next day for the Second Saturday at the Garden event open to the general public. CTAHR’s O‘ahu Cooperative Extension Office and Academic and Student Affairs partnered again to organize this annual event, while funding support was provided by USDA through CTAHR’s Agribusiness Education, Training, and Incubation Program. The City and County of Honolulu also provided generous funding for this event and gave the crowd of 600 a warming welcome in the middle of the morning. Thanks go to the Pearl City Urban Garden Center staff and volunteers, ASAO staff, and Waimanalo Research Station staff for planning and setting up the event, along with a big mahalo to the CTAHR faculty and staff, government agencies, community members, and company representatives who volunteered their time and knowledge for the presentations and exhibits at the Friday and Saturday events. Dr. Po-Yung Lai of the City and County of Honolulu also deserves gratitude for helping to acquire funding for this year’s event. Check out pictures of the day here!

    Conserving Resources for Sustainability

    3/31/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Linda Cox interviewed on Generation AnthropoceneThe UHM Generation Anthropocene project, inspired by a similar project by graduate students at Stanford University, is a series of podcast interviews with faculty to discuss human impacts on the environment. The project’s creators, Brian LaCarter and Erin VanGorden, point out that humans are directly changing the earth, unlike at any other point in time, and invite various experts to focus on particular ways this is happening. The project’s video interviews have been selected for presentation at this year’s Sustainability Summit. An interview about community economics with Linda J. Cox (NREM) is now posted at the site, discussing the importance of controlling feral cats in order to keep them from killing native birds. Linda also stresses the necessity of thinking in the long term, pointing out that a time frame of one hundred years is appropriate for assessing the health of a community and that society’s tendency to consume all resources as quickly as possible is counter to the very notion of sustainability.

    A Milestone in the Journey

    3/31/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    CTAHR student convocation 2013Everyone is invited to attend the CTAHR Spring 2014 Graduation Convocation on Wednesday, May 7, to help graduating students celebrate their academic achievements (pictured, last year’s event). Check out this website for more information. Please RSVP by Friday, April 18, for seating and refreshment purposes by completing the online form on the website (some questions will not pertain to you, so just fill in the first four questions and click the submit button). Check-in begins at 5:15 p.m. in the Campus Center Ballroom, followed by the program from 5:30 to 7:00 p.m. If you have any questions, feel free to contact Sylvia Trinh at strinh@hawaii.edu.

    The Peaceful, Heroic Rose

    3/31/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Peace rose bushThere’s a lot going on at the Urban Garden Center! Two new rose gardens, the Heroes Rose Garden and the Peace Rose Garden, have been established there. Tended by the Honolulu Rose Society, they are planted with roses whose names relate to heroes or to peace (pictured is the Peace rose) and were the impetus for a recent writing contest in which schoolchildren were encouraged to write about what peace or heroes meant to them. The winners will be honored at a ceremony on April 12 that will also feature a Hawaiian blessing for the gardens and the newly built Rose Pavilion. On the same day, the OUG will offer its traditional Second Saturday programs, which this month will include a free seed- and plant-sharing workshop and event. Experts will speak on seed saving and selection, and then members of the community are encouraged to bring their own saved seeds, huli, cuttings, and rhizomes to share and barter with others. Add in the usual plant sales, docent tour, garden demos, and plant question booth staffed by Master Gardeners, and it’s a full and fun—and peaceful and heroic—day! Pre-register to secure your seat by calling 453-6050, but walk-ins are welcome as space allows.

    Life After CTAHR?

    3/31/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    CTAHR students at career eventYes! About 50 students and 9 employers gathered in Gilmore Hall on last week for the “Careers After CTAHR” workshop, which focused on careers related to the fields of study of Family Resources (FAMR), Animal Sciences (ANSC), and Food Science and Human Nutrition (FSHN). Local professionals, many of whom are CTAHR alums, came from a wide array of companies and organizations, including the Susannah Wesley Community Center, University Lab School, UH-Manoa Office of Admissions, WIC Services, HPC Foods, Kokua Hawaii Foundation, UH-Manoa Office of Research and Compliance, Hawaii Medical Veterinary Association, and WCC Veterinary Technology Program. Students learned about potential internship/career opportunities and the personal career pathways and experiences of those working in jobs related to their fields of study, and they received tips on how to prepare themselves for the workforce. Both students and employers benefited from the experience. Many thanks go to all the professionals who volunteered their time to share their valuable knowledge and experiences with the students, ASAO for organizing this event, CTAHR student volunteers, and the students who attended.

    Controlling Organic Pests?

    3/31/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Ladybug and aphidsWell, the Organic Pest Control class at LCC may not teach precisely that, but it will tell you how to get rid of unwanted insect interlopers without synthetic chemicals. The class will be held in room CE-303 on Friday, April 4, from 1:00 to 3:30 p.m. It’s intended to assist organic farmers in defining what “organic” means in regard to USDA certification, determining whether a pesticide is organic or not, and clarifying what role the Hawaii Department of Agriculture has in regulating organic operations. Other hot topics of interest for organic farmers will be discussed, such as “Integrated Pest Management” and “How to Protect Pollinators.” Regulatory requirements such as the Worker Protection Standard will be reviewed to assure compliance by organic operations. The class, conducted by HDOA, will cost $25, and you can register here. This class is also good towards 2 recertification credits for private applicators of restricted-use pesticides! Its course number is AGR5040.

    Oyster Mushrooms

    3/31/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Shelby ChingPEPS Tropical Plant Pathology graduate student Shelby Ching received a Western Region Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (WSARE) Graduate Student Grant Award to work on “Spent oyster mushroom compost for nematode management” under the guidance of Koon-Hui Wang (PEPS). Beside many uses of oyster mushroom in the kitchen, Shelby and Koon-HuiuiHui are looking at fine-tuning the use of oyster mushroom compost for pre- and post-plant management of root-knot nematodes on fresh basil in Hawai‘i. Congratulations, Shelby and Koon-Hui!

    Researching Their Futures

    3/31/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Jinan Banna, Samantha Erin De Leon, Maili HuckJinan Banna (HNFAS) (left) and FSHN undergraduate students Maili Huck (right) and Samantha Erin De Leon (center) received a travel grant from the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology/Maximizing Access to Research Careers Program, which will provide funding for their attendance at the Experimental Biology annual meeting. Experimental Biology is a multidisciplinary scientific meeting open to those with interest in research and life sciences. Among the participating societies is the American Society for Nutrition, which will offer sessions hosted by various research interest sections. At the meeting, the students will have ample opportunity to network and identify career opportunities. Both students have an interest in incorporating research into their future careers; Maili plans to pursue a master’s degree in nutrition and obtain a credential as a registered dietitian, while Samantha wishes to practice medicine as a physician. Attending Experimental Biology will assist them in further clarifying their research interests as they move to the next steps in their career paths.

    Lori Yancura’s Awesome Teaching Skills

    3/31/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Lori YancuraA big congratulations to Lori Yancura (FCS) for her wonderful and well-deserved honor as a recipient of the 2014 UH Manoa Chancellor’s Citation for Meritorious Teaching Award. Lori will be recognized at the UH-Manoa Award ceremony on April 30. Lori provides excellence in teaching research methods to the department's more than 300 majors. Students create research projects and improve their science literacy for the investigation of factors underlying the resiliency of both individuals and fashion businesses. Congratulations, Lori!

    Fun With Alumni

    3/31/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Touring the Kapiolani CC gardensThe CTAHR Alumni Association banquet on March 21 was enlivened by a tour of Kapi‘olani Community College's Culinary Arts program's aquaponics system, garden, and food-composting facility, led by pastry chef and KCC instructor Dave Brown. A yummy dinner prepared by the Culinary Arts students included poi bread pudding with haupia sauce and Bananas Foster cheesecake made with fruit provided by CTAHR student Gabe Sachter-Smith. Gabe, who is a member of the CTAHRAA board, also shared both bounty from his garden in Manoa and, in speech to the gathering, his bountiful information on growing food in the tropics. If you're new to gardening, skip the exotic bell peppers and beefsteak tomatoes in favor of plants such as cassava and pigeon peas, that like to grow in the tropics, he advised. Among the seeds and plant starts he shared was luffa, whose gourds can be eaten when young or harvested later for loofah sponges. The evening concluded with a raffle drawing for coveted prizes from golf balls to a queen-size quilt. Proceeds go toward CTAHR student scholarships.

    Persidangan Rayap!

    3/31/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Ken Grace at termite conferenceKen Grace (Interim Associate Dean of Research) was keynote speaker in February at TRG10, the 10th conference (persidangan) of the Pacific Rim Termite (rayap) Research Group in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Ken discussed CTAHR research on two of the most destructive termites worldwide, the Formosan and the Asian subterranean termites. In addition to two days of discussion on wood chewers, the group also took time to chew some delicious Malaysian food in a closing banquet in the Kuala Lumpur Tower, and visited Forest Research Institute Malaysia (FRIM), the government center for wood and forestry research.

    Spreading Mindfulness

    3/31/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Thao Le on KGMBThao Le (FAMR) is everywhere! She was featured on Hawai‘i News Now March 18 and 19 for her mindfulness program to provide skills for stress reduction, self-regulation, and resiliency to incarcerated youth at the Hawai‘i Youth Correctional Facility. Thao also chaired the first panel at the Numata Conference sponsored by UH Department of Religion and the Numata Foundation, and presented her paper “Preventing Violence: Implementation and Outcome of a Mindfulness-Based Intervention in Hawai‘i and Vietnam.” In addition, her poster on this mindfulness program was also selected through a competitive selection process to participate in the special poster session “Adolescence in Diverse Contexts” at the Society for Research in Adolescence conference in Austin, Texas. Great work, Thao!

    Studying Abroad and Beyond

    3/31/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Kacie HoKacie Ho, a FSHN alumna, was featured in the UHM Study Abroad Newsletter. She studied in Seville, Spain in the fall of 2011 with her academic advisor Wayne Iwaoka (HNFAS) and credits Wayne with encouraging her to gain a broader cultural understanding outside of Hawai‘i. After her experiences and work in Spain, Kacie presented the seminar "Spanish Olives: Growing, Harvesting, and Processing." Currently, Kacie is a graduate student in the Food Sciences Department at Purdue University, where she was featured in a Graduate Ag Research Spotlight. Her research focuses on lycopene, the compound that gives tomatoes their red-orange color. She is studying the use of microwaves to enhance the efficiency of extracting lycopene from tomato peels, a major and often discarded by-product of processing. Encapsulating the lycopene in nanoemulsions might allow it to be added to food products as a natural color or nutritional enhancement. Go for it, Kacie!

    Fashionable Honolulu Streets

    3/31/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Image from Honolulu Street StyleAndrew Reilly’s new book Honolulu Street Style (last seen in the January 22 edition of CTAHR Notes) was featured in the Star Advertiser. "One thing I hope this book will accomplish is to show people that Hawai‘i does have a style and aesthetic beyond what they think it is, and understand there is a fashion industry here that I think is on an upswing now,” Andy says. “Hawai‘i had an impact on fashion from the 1930s through '60s, and I think it will make an impact again." Honolulu Street Style is available from Amazon. Read the whole Star Advertiser article here!

    Likeable Bug Science

    3/31/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Dan Rubinoff on Likeable ScienceHawai‘i insects are very special! Dan Rubinoff (PEPS) discussed the diversity of Hawai‘i’s bugs, the Insect Museum, and the science of bugs on Likeable Science, an offshoot of ThinkTech Hawai‘i on ‘Olelo Community Media. He shared facts about some of the unique insects in Hawai‘i, including carnivorous caterpillars (complete with video of caterpillar carnage), amphibious caterpillars, and the Pulelehua Project’s Kamehameha butterfly. And speaking of pulelehua, according to the Project’s Facebook page the project has received many photo submissions from the public thanks to last week’s media exposure, with 10 new confirmed sightings of the Kamehameha butterfly on four islands, Moloka‘i, O‘ahu, Kaua‘i, and Hawai‘i! Check out What Bugs Hawai‘i on Youtube, as well as a funny comic strip about the hunt for the Kamehameha butterfly. Go, team insects!

    Going the Distance (Education!)

    3/31/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Faculty at the Distance Education open houseAbout 25 faculty members attended CTAHR’s first Distance Education Open House, both in person and from a distance. Distance Education Specialist Kellie Kong shared tips and resources for successful online teaching and offered a preview of instruction projects in the works from extension (GoFarm Hawai‘i and Maui Master Gardeners) to academic (FAMR 331). Helen Spafford (PEPS), who earned CTAHR’s Excellence in Teaching award and the Association for Education Communication and Technology’s Division of Distance Learning’s Crystal Award for her online course (PEPS 250 World of Insects), pointed out the value of being able to deliver Manoa coursework to students statewide. Susan Miyasaka (TPSS) shared the opposite experience, teaching courses to Manoa students from Hilo. Her Komohana colleague J.B. Friday (NREM) recommended approaching online teaching more like a science meeting than a traditional lecture. Young-Jin Bahng (FCS) said the efficiencies of teaching online allow her to include more non-majors in her course (FDM 471 International Apparel Trade Issues), which expands insights shared. Brent Sipes (PEPS) has adopted an asynchronous, unit-mastery module approach. “The students seem pretty independent, even eschewing email contact but doing pretty well,” he said; “maybe I need the interaction of the traditional classroom more than they do!”

    Genes and Seed Development

    3/26/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Bob Goldberg giving a lectureCheck out the genes in those seeds! Dr. Bob Goldberg will present the seminar “Dissecting Seed Development Using Genomics: Implications for Agriculture” on Thursday, March 27, 3:00 p.m. in the Agricultural Science building 319. Dr. Goldberg’s current research goal is to identify all soybean genes required to “make a seed” using state-of-the-art genomic and epigenomic technologies in order to develop crops that produce more, larger, and more nutritious seeds, and thereby significantly enhance our food supply. He was the founding editor and editor-in-chief of The Plant Cell, has received numerous awards for his pioneering research in plant molecular biology, and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2001. His commitment to undergraduate and graduate education earned him many prestigious teaching awards, and Newsweek Magazine named him one of America’s “Top Professors” in 2009.

    CTAHR and Sustainability

    3/26/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Sustainability SummitDoug Vincent and Joannie Dobbs (both HNFAS) presented at the 2nd Annual Sustainability in Higher Education Summit recently held at Windward Community College. The annual event is for empowering higher education in Hawai‘i to lead the sustainability transformation of our communities. Faculty, staff, students, and administrators from the UH 10 campus system, plus HPU, BYU, and Chaminade convened to establish and advance sustainability goals. Joannie and Doug presented posters on ANSC/FSHN 601 The Science of Food Systems and the CTAHR Food Systems Quiz Bowl. As part of a panel of higher education leaders, Dean Maria Gallo described CTAHR’s role in building in a sustainable Hawai‘i. Associate Extension Director Carl Evensen and Ashley Stokes (HNFAS) presented on the “Cooperative Extension: Educating our Community for a Sustainable Future.” Finally, Joannie gave a presentation entitled “True Sustainability Requires Providing Adequate Essential Nutrients for Humans.” Adding to the nutritional content, TPSS master's student Gabe Sachter-Smith provided bananas to the conference.

    Biotech and Pest Control

    3/25/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Biotech In Focus issue 5The new issue of Biotech in Focus features guest writer Mark Wright (PEPS) and explores the toll pests take on farmers. The issue explains natural resistance, biological control, what we’ve learned from synthetic insecticides such as DDT, and more. Read the new issue of Biotech in Focus, and find back issues on the website.

    Pest Invaders

    3/18/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    lychees in fruit bagTroubled by pests on the Big Island? UH-CTAHR’s Risk Management Hawaii program will be hosting the following events to boost your knowledge and production: on Thursday, March 27, be ready for thrills and chills as you explore “Alien Invaders of the Worst Kind - A Systems Approach to Pest Management” from 6:00 to 7:00 p.m. in the Waimea Civic Center conference room. On Friday, March 28, you can find out all about Lychee Pest Management at the Fruit Bagging and Fruit Fly Control Field Day, 10:00 to 11:30 a.m. in Kawika Tropical Fruit Orchards in Hakalau. This event is limited to 25 participants, and an RSVP is required—contact Gina by phone at (808) 322-4892 or by email at ginab@hawaii.edu by Mar. 27 to reserve your spot!

    Suck ’Em Up!

    3/18/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    LeafhopperGordon M. Bennett IV, a USDA NIFA post-doc at the University of Texas, Austin, will offer a lecture on the “Evolution and Symbioses of Sap-Feeding Insects” on Thursday, March 20, from 10:45 to 11:45 a.m. in Gilmore 301. He points out that “the relationship between plants and insects is one of the most prolific evolutionary stories unfolding on earth” and that plant-insect interactions in sap-feeding insects have important implications for “ecosystem function and agricultural sustainability.” Dr. Bennett explores these interactions using molecular and genomic approaches, focusing on agriculturally important leafhoppers.

    Did You Know...

    3/11/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    CTAHR in focus...that in this time of economic belt-tightening and dwindling funding, CTAHR actually makes the State money? There's a 117-percent return on State investment in the college in terns of extramural funding generated for every State dollar allocated to CTAHR. Find out more inspiring and interesting facts about the college by checking out the recent publication CTAHR in Focus, if you haven't yet gotten the chance! With the Centennial of the national Cooperative Extension Service happening this year, there's no better time to fuel your CTAHR pride!

    Milestones of Tea

    3/11/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Sylvia Yuen and Harold Masumoto roll teaCTAHR’s Risk Management Hawaii program will be hosting its 10th monthly Tea 101 workshop on March 20 at the Mealani Research Station on the Big Island. Randy Hamasaki, county Extension agent, and Stuart Nakamoto, Extension economist, are the instructors. This has been a popular event on the Big Island and would not have been possible without the help of the Mealani Research Station crew: Marla, Lori, Roy, Les, and Sonny. Tea growers and others interested in tea production have been attending Tea 101 to learn the basics of tea growing and processing. To date, 84 people have completed this 7-hour workshop. The event features a small class size for a more personal, intimate learning experience and uses innovative training approaches such as the hands-on “Wok and Roll” method for teaching the basics of tea processing, here ably illustrated by former Interim Dean Sylvia Yuen and Harold Masumoto. In addition, participants get an intensive introduction into the growing (the tea plant, varieties, propagation, planting, shaping the plant, pruning, irrigation, fertilization, harvesting, and pest management) and market potential of Hawai‘i-grown tea. Based on evaluation surveys, workshop participants unanimously agreed or strongly agreed that the training increased their knowledge and understanding of tea growing and processing basics, and 100% also agreed or strongly agreed that the teaching methods used were appropriate. On average, participants responded that they will apply more than 9 things that they learned to their operation. Randy and Stuart plan to offer a Tea 102 workshop covering more in-depth topics such as propagation, fertilization, and other topics requested by Tea 101 participants. Due to the workshops’ popularity, there is a waiting list for future events; contact Randy at rth@hawaii.edu for more information.

    Don’t Panic! Survey Organic!

    3/11/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    SeedlingGot an extra minute? Why not spend it helping PEPS 421 students? They need your input for a survey on the public perception of organic produce, and if you’ve responded to other survey requests for this class, you know how helpful, painless, and productive of gratitude it is. Just click here! This is an educational exercise for the students, so any feedback you have on the survey questions too will be welcome. You can contact Helen Spafford, the class professor, via email and she will give the feedback to the students.

    Now You CBB, Now You Don’t

    3/11/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Coffee berry borers on coffee cherriesOn January 6, UH CTAHR’s Risk Management Hawaii (RMH) program hosted an informative and collaborative gathering at USDA-ARS-PBARC in Hilo to discuss the Coffee Berry Borer (CBB), which continues to pose major production, marketing, legal, and financial risks for coffee growers and processors in Hawai‘i. Thirty people involved with CBB research, education and outreach, funding, and administration participated in this very productive event. Attendees were research scientists, extension agents, specialists, and governmental agency personnel, as well as some growers who are collaborating on research projects. The goal of the summit was to inform participants of current research projects and to update the 2013 CBB Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and Sampling Recommendations provided by CTAHR to growers and the coffee industry. Facilitators of this event were assistant extension agent Andrea Kawabata (also credited with the photo) and extension economist Stuart Nakamoto; also assisting were junior extension agents Ryan Tsutsui and Maria “Didi” Diaz-Lyke. As a result of the summit, a 2014 CBB IPM and Sampling Recommendation document is currently being drafted and will be distributed to summit participants and the Hawai‘i coffee industry. Andrea Kawabata and growers’ groups have begun providing RMH-sponsored educational workshops and field days to guide coffee growers on the implementation of these CBB IPM recommendations. The next CBB workshops happening in March will be Thursday, March 13 – CBB and Farm Health; 9:00 to 11:00 a.m.; Monday, March 17 – Spray Equipment Calibration and Spray Calculation Workshop and Field Day; 3:00 to 5:00 p.m.; and Wednesday, March 19 – CBB IPM with Focus on Field Sanitation, Sampling, Monitoring and Early Season Spraying; 5:00 to 6:30 p.m. All workshops take place at UH CTAHR Kona Cooperative Extension Service (KCES).

    Curators of Fashion

    3/11/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Grand Affair posterCome check out “The Grand Affair, an exhibition by FDM students in connection with UHM Museum Day. The exhibition runs March 10th through the 19th (including Sunday, March 16) in Miller 101 and 112. Students choose one or more items from the Historic Costume Collection to conduct a group exhibition. Admission is free, so be sure to take this chance to look at some of the amazing costumes on display!

    Science Tech and Plants

    3/4/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Image from Biotech in Focus issue 4
    Plant breeding goes high tech in the new issue of Biotech in Focus! This issue explores the history of selective breeding of plants and how science has kicked up the process through mutagenesis breeding, propagation, tissue culture, and hybrids. Check out the latest issue of Biotech in Focus and visit the website for previous issues.

    February



    Mike DuPonte Is Everywhere!

    2/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Mike DuPonte and a pigletMaking news with pigs and cattle! Mike DuPonte’s (HNFAS) work was featured in three news articles. The ACRES USA magazine and the Hawai‘i Tribune Herald featured Mike’s Korean Natural Farming (KNF) piggery on the Big Island, an odorless, fly-free facility, and his plans for expansion. Through Mike’s work, the KNF piggery was recognized by the USDA for “Best Management Practices.” The KNF piggery incorporates indigenous microorganisms into the soil to break down the animal waste. Using a deep green waste litter system and a building design that takes the sun’s position and natural ventilation into account, the piggery is clean and sustainable and requires no waste removal. The animals are less stressed, healthier, and more marketable. On Moloka‘i, the Maui News featured Mike’s efforts to revive Moloka‘i Ranch by introducing the famous Wagyu cattle DNA into the herd. The ranch is taking the first steps by artificially inseminating 50 cows with Wagyu semen in the hopes that in future years, Wagyu beef will be on the menu for Moloka‘i. Great work, Mike!

    Producing a Winner With Winning Produce

    2/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    The Holoholo General Store logoAgribusiness Incubator Program client Holoholo General Store won the Mahiai Match-Up Agricultural Business Plan contest. The contest, sponsored by Kamehameha Schools and the Ke Alii Pauahi Foundation, looks for innovative local businesses that address an agricultural need in Hawai‘i with an eye toward financial and community sustainability. The winner receives $25,000 and an agricultural lease from Kamehameha Schools. Holoholo General Store delivers bags of local, organic, and sustainable produce for schools and businesses, and they hope to have a Holoholo General Store truck in the future to bring fresh produce to neighborhoods and communities. Read more in the Pacific Business News article. Congratulations!

    Go! Farm!

    2/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    GoFarm logo and image of plantsDo you think you’re the right fit for a farm? Windward is hosting a free AgCurious seminar on the GoFarm Hawai‘i program on March 3, 5:00 p.m. at Hale Akoakoa. Come hear successful O‘ahu farmers talk story about their start-up experiences the challenges and benefits of ag-centered lifestyles. Gain an understanding of the agriculture industry in Hawai‘i and its importance, and find out if you are ready to jump into the great world of farming. GoFarm alumni will be on hand to talk about what’s great about the program. You must attend this event to apply for GoFarm Hawai‘i @ Windward’s AgXposure and AgSchool programs. The last day to register is Friday, February 28. Email info@gofarmhawaii.org to register. Go, future farmers!

    Good Food and Good Alumni Friends!

    2/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Fresh produce and ingredientsPlease join the CTAHR Alumni Association and Friends for their annual dinner on March 21, 5:00 to 9:00 p.m. at the Tamarind Room in the Ohelo Building at Kapi‘olani Community College. The event includes a tour of the Culinary Garden and Facilities with Chef David Brown, a fabulous gourmet dinner, and a presentation on easy-to-grow vegetables for the home gardener. The cost is $40 per person, with checks payable to CTAHRAA. The proceeds will go to support the CTAHR Alumni Association. For more information, contact Susan Miller at 396-7816. Please mail in your reservation by March 1 to CTAHR Alumni Association c/o UH-Manoa, 3050 Maile Way, Gilmore 210, Honolulu, HI 96822.

    Science Fair Project Power

    2/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Soojin Jun, Ariana Kim, and Kara YamadaWhat started as just a science project could end up saving lives. Ariana Kim, a St. Andrew’s Priory School sophomore, working with HNFAS' Soojin Jun and Kara Yamada (pictured flanking Ariana) developed a microwire sensor that can accurately detect E. coli bacteria in about 30 minutes, much faster than the 12-hour method currently used. The technology has the potential to have a major impact on the food industry and public health. Ariana won the CTAHR award at the 2013 Hawai‘i Science Fair for her microwire research under the mentorship of Soojin and Kara. Since then, she has been working in microbiology and micro-bio sensors with Soojin and his graduate students. Read the Star Advertiser article here. Great work, Ariana!

    A Home Where the Wagyu Roam

    2/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Cows on Moloka‘i RanchWhere’s the beef? Moloka‘i! Hawai‘i News Now reported on work by Jinzen Yang (HNFAS) on introducing premium Wagyu genes into the stock on Moloka‘i Ranch. Of the 49 cows artificially inseminated with Wagyu breeding material, 27 were reported to be pregnant. Another 50 cows were recently inseminated with hopes for another 50% success rate. The plan for Moloka‘i Ranch is to produce Kobe-style beef not just through herd improvement but also through nutrition management. Mike DuPonte (also HNFAS) is working on the project, as CTAHR Notes reported last week. Check out the Hawai‘i News Now video here. Mmmm, beef.

    Attacking Albizia

    2/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    James Leary treating an albizia trunk with herbicideIts foliage can be beautiful, but the fast-growing Albizia tree can be deadly. James Leary (NREM) was interviewed by KITV on the destructive effects of Albizias tree and methods to curb their invasive expansion. The trees grow tall, fast, and brittle and cause problems ranging from damaging power lines and blocking roads to choking out native plants. James explained his effective method of applying herbicide to small cuts in the trees’ trunks, a method that will kill the tree where it stands over time at minimal cost. Read more about James’s herbicide application process, and watch the video at KITV.

    Butterfly Power

    2/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    The Kamehameha ButterflyThis project has wings! Television news and radio programs have been helping to boost the butterfly signal, enlisting the public’s help in tracking the Kamehameha butterfly for the Pulelehua Project. The state insect since 2009, the Kamehameha butterfly has an uncertain future, and Dan Rubinoff and Will Haines (both PEPS) created the Pulelehua Project in an effort to study and preserve this iconic winged insect. The project is asking for the public to report any sightings of the butterfly or its eggs, caterpillars, or chrysalises. Check out the KHON video and the Pulelehua Project website. A big mahalo to UH System’s Dan Meisenzahl for helping to get the word out!

    Feral Cat Population Management

    2/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Feral catsCats make wonderful pets, but feral cats have been and still are a problem in the Islands. Cheryl Lohr and Christopher Lepczyk (both NREM) published “Desires and Management Preferences of Stakeholders Regarding Feral Cats in the Hawaiian Islands” in Conservation Biology. The study surveyed people from stakeholder groups as well as randomly selected state residents, and 87% of the more than 1,500 respondents want to see a decrease in the number of feral cats in the Islands. The stakeholder groups were animal welfare activists, hunters, conservation professionals, agriculturalists, and native Hawaiians. In addition to the support of reducing the feral cat population, respondents indicated that of seven feral cat management techniques (including lethal methods), “trap, neuter, and release” was the least preferred. Read more in the American Bird Conservancy press release.

    Social Physique Anxiety in Gay Men

    2/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Andrew Reilly and Loriena YancuraAndrew Reilly and Loriena Yancura (both FCS) authored “Three Predictive Variables of Social Physique Anxiety Among Gay Men” in Psychology & Sexuality. Using a sociological framework, the study examined three variables related to gay men’s body image as possible predictors of social physique anxiety: drive for muscularity, internalized homophobia, and a new variable, sexual position identity. The study used the Internet to collect data from 542 gay men, with a mean age of 33 years. They were mostly white and college educated and lived in the United States. Findings from a regression analysis indicated that social physique anxiety was predicted by internalized homophobia, drive for muscularity, and sexual position identity, accounting for 22% of the variance. The study is available at the Psychology & Sexuality website.

    10 Fabulous Years!

    2/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Marietta Escobar-Solis
    Congratulations to Marietta Escobar-Solis for her 10 years of service to the university! Marietta came to OCS about two years ago from Kapi‘olani CC and has been keeping this bustling office on track ever since. She has also been making good use of the employee tuition waiver to pursue her AA degree. Mahalo for all the great work, Marietta!

    Honoring Dr. B, Again!

    2/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    James Brewbaker honored by the Honolulu City CouncilThe Honolulu City Council honored corn pioneer James Brewbaker (TPSS) on his selection for the 2013 Crop Science Society of America Presidential Award and for his many exceptional contributions to the community and the state of Hawai‘i. Dr. B was presented with a certificate on January 29 recognizing his more than 60 years of experience in plant breeding and his significant influence on crop science in Hawai‘i. The Crop Science Society of America Presidential Award recognizes outstanding contributions to crop science through education, national and international service, and research. Congratulations, Dr. B!

    A Full Flowering of Honors

    2/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Kelvin Sewake with Dean Maria Gallo receiving the HFNA awardKelvin Sewake (PEPS) was recently honored for his 28 years of dedicated service to Hawai‘i’s floral and nursery industries in the Cooperative Extension Service. On January 18, Kelvin was recognized at the Hawai‘i Floriculture and Nursery Association/Hawai‘i Florists and Shippers 66th Annual Shinnenkai event in Hilo. Dean Maria Gallo introduced him and stated his many accomplishments in the ornamental industry. Kelvin received certificates expressing appreciation and recognizing his achievements from Hawai‘i County’s Mayor Billy Kenoi, from Senator Gilbert Kahele on behalf of the Hawai‘i State Senate, and from Representative Clift Tsuji on behalf of the Hawai‘i State House of Representatives. He credited his CTAHR colleagues and the hard-working farmers who help to keep Hawai‘i agriculture alive and well. On January 23, Kelvin was honored by the Tropical Orchid Growers Association of Hawai‘i at their annual installation dinner in Mapunapuna, where President Bernie Cagauan presented him with a Certificate of Appreciation. Kelvin has been assisting O‘ahu’s flower and nursery growers for the past 2-1/2 years, providing farm visits, educational presentations, and working with the industry organizations. Many congratulations!

    Awesome Case Study Review!

    2/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Journal of Agricultural & Food Information and Agricultural Markets in a Transitional Economy: An Albanian Case StudyThe Journal of Agricultural & Food Information published a review of Agricultural Markets in a Transitional Economy: An Albanian Case Study edited by Catherine Chan-Halbrendt and Jean Fantle-Lepczyk (NREM). The review, by Karen Lindquist, praises the book’s emphasis on the need for agricultural extension and the impact of the university on future market growth, particularly for developing countries. Lindquist also stresses the importance of case studies to agricultural economics because of the limitations on theory in rendering the economic and political impacts on the agricultural market. Read more of the review on the Journal of Agricultural & Food Information website.

    International Food Science Collaboration

    2/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Dean Maria Gallo, Halina Zaleski, Sejong UniversityDean Maria Gallo welcomed Soo-Jong Um, dean of the College of Life Sciences at Sejong University, and colleagues to campus last week for the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding. The document opens doors for faculty and student exchanges and research collaboration, beginning with food-related sciences at CTAHR and the private Seoul, Korea institution. Observing were Sanghoon Ko of the Sejong Department of Food Science and Technology; Halina Zaleski, chair of HNFAS; and Sang-Ho Yoo, head of the Sejong Department of Bio-Integrated Science and Technology. More photos of the event are available on the CTAHR Flickr site.

    Dunking for Spring

    2/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Students from the CTAHR Spring EventWoo hoo, spring! Enjoying a break in recent rainy weather, students, faculty, and staff gathered outside Gilmore Hall for a mini-carnival complete with free hotdogs, popcorn, and games with prizes. Balloon artists created whimsical characters and agriculturally significant insects on request, and students lined up for the chance to drop their faculty members into the drink in the ever-popular dunking booth. The event was free, but more than $250 in donations were collected for CTAHR's Urban Garden Center. Check out more pictures of the event at the CTAHR Flickr website. Big thanks to Ted Radovich (TPSS), Samir Khanal (MBBE), Helen Spafford (PEPS), Tomoaki Miura (NREM), Lori Yancura (FCS), and J-P Bingham (MBBE) for volunteering to get dunked. Mahalo to Charlie Nelson for assisting with food arrangements and the carnival layout. Also, great thanks to the Friends of the Urban Garden Center and Janice Uchida (PEPS) for donating potted plants for prizes and to SAPFB for partially funding this event. Mahalo to the Spring Event student committee, scholarship recipients and student ambassador volunteers, and ASAO for their time and dedication in making this a smooth and successful event. Lastly, thank you to everyone who attended and donated to this year’s cause and making this year’s carnival another memorable CTAHR event!

    CTAHR Highlights on Every Island!

    2/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    CTAHR In Focus imageCheck out the college’s new publication, CTAHR in Focus, a snapshot of CTAHR impacts statewide. Representative rather than comprehensive, it combines county-by-county data with profiles and features that provide a sample of how our People, Place, and Promise focus plays out across our departments and islands. CTAHR is making an impact everywhere!

    Spice It Up!

    2/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    The Hawaiian chili pepperTed Radovich, Archana Pant (both TPSS), and J-P Bingham (MBBE) were featured in a Hana Hou: The Magazine of Hawaiian Airlines article, “The Tropic of Capsicum,” about the Hawaiian chili. The article highlights work on improving the unique and powerful chili, increasing the size of the chili, the yield for producers, and the size of the market. The Hawaiian chili is mostly known as the best component of chili pepper water, but this popular ingredient is hard to get, and even harder to get with reliable flavor consistency. Ted’s study looks to clarify the qualities of the Hawaiian chili for producers and consumers to help it find a niche market for chili lovers everywhere. Read the whole article on the Hana Hou website. The good stuff is on page two.

    Sustain, Renew, Produce

    2/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    On-Farm Renewable Energy and Sustainable Local Food Production: A Case StudyGo, hydro-power! Center on the Family recently published On-Farm Renewable Energy and Sustainable Local Food Production: A Case Study. The report presents baseline data from a case study of a small-scale, on-farm hydro-power facility in Hawai‘i County. The hydro-power project was intended to demonstrate how a renewable energy source can support farm profitability and increased local food production. The report discusses three major themes that emerged from interviews that were conducted with tenant farmers at the site as well as several key community informants. The themes are (1) the importance of a cooperative family of farms model to the survival of small farmers, (2) the potential for on-farm renewable energy to increase production and profits, and (3) the contributions of local agriculture to regional rural economic development. Download On-Farm Renewable Energy and Sustainable Local Food Production: A Case Study from the Center on the Family website.

    Que Enfermedad Tiene Esta Planta?

    2/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    The Plant Doctor app“Diagnóstico,” the Spanish-language version of “The Plant Doctor” app for iPhones and iOS devices, is ready for download at iTunes. To access the Spanish version, set the default language for your device to “Español” (in Settings - General - International - Language). Users will receive diagnoses and management recommendations in Spanish. During the past 12 months, more than 1,000 people from 42 states in the USA and from 35 foreign countries used the app for plant pest diagnoses. The Plant Doctor provides interactive diagnosis and advice about plant diseases in gardens, landscapes, nurseries and farms. The app provides descriptions of ten of the most common plant diseases. If users are unsure about the nature of their own problem, they can get a diagnosis totally free! For diagnosis, the app collects user-supplied text and photographs and sends it to a professional plant pathologist having more than 20 years of experience. The user receives communications from the pathologist, including the probable disease name and pathogen, disease management tactics, and contact information for local experts who may provide more information or examine samples. Get “The Plant Doctor” in English as well!

    Supporting Beef at the Top

    2/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Beef Industry students at the capitolSometimes support for beef production comes far from the ranch. Supporting the beef industry in Hawai‘i, a $46M industry (3rd in diversified agriculture, HASS 2011), means more than understanding stocking rates and reproductive efficiency. It also means meeting legislators and talking about the importance of the beef industry and Hawai‘i agriculture to policymakers. Guided by Brent Buckley (HNFAS) and in conjunction with the Hawai‘i Cattlemen’s Council, nine Animal Sciences students visited legislators and staffers on January 29 to do just that. The ANSC 431 Beef Production class learned that “beef production” is more than cows and calves and pastures and forages. Attending were Krista Ann Lee, Janelle Parkin, Carramae Madayag, Mandy Chen, Alex Porlier Langlois, Melissa Dumas, Jeanette Tyson, Melissa Roach, and Casandra Kawamura. Spread the word about Hawai‘i’s beef!

    Extend Yourself

    2/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Cooperative Extension System centennial logoThis year marks the 100-year anniversary of the signing of the Smith-Lever Act, which officially created the national Cooperative Extension System. Although extension agents didn’t come to Hawai‘i until 1929, the extension system is an important and integral part of CTAHR. The centennial is a great occasion to promote both cooperative extension and CTAHR in Hawai‘i, with information on the college’s website and via social media. There will also be several events that will be held on the Manoa campus and in the counties celebrating extension’s history and accomplishments as well as present contributions. The CES extends university-based research and knowledge to the community and is one of the pillars of our tripartite land-grant mission. Please share your stories about extension programs and events (awesome past ones and exciting new ones), or experiences that made a difference in someone’s life. If you have pictures, so much the better! Send write-ups, images, links to CES100@ctahr.hawaii.edu for possible inclusion in Twitter, Facebook, Impact Report, CTAHR Notes and Alumni & Friends, and more!

    What’s That Tree?

    2/27/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    The Be Still TreeCurious about the many lovely plants and trees on campus? Learn about Integrating Education, Maintenance and Environmental Awareness through Campus Landscape Mapping, Thursday, February 27, 12:00 noon at Kuykendall 101. In this session, Buildings and Grounds Management Director Roxanne Adams and Landscape Assistant Nathan Ortiz (TPSS student, yay!) will show how they used open-source programming to create the UHM Plant Map, which provides customers with search, sort, and navigational functions to campus trees from desktop or mobile devices. This project directly supports sustainable management decisions, while simultaneously increasing biodiversity and the education potential of the landscape. The target audience is two-fold: landscape crew and supervisors use the system for grounds management, while general public can use the maps to intelligently navigate the landscape. Check out The UHM Plant Map and put names to those familiar plants!

    Save Money, Save the Day

    2/27/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    The UH Saves logoIt’s all about money! The UH Saves Day Financial Education Expo, co-sponsored by CES, celebrates smart financial planning to encourage students, faculty, and staff to save, pay down debt, and build wealth. On Wednesday, February 26, at Campus Center, there were interactive exhibits, a scavenger hunt, a photo booth, and lots of giveaways. On February 27, 5:30 p.m. at the Hale Aloha Courtyard, teams including one from FamR will compete in the LifeSmarts Challenge. The teams will be tested on various financial concepts, with two $500 scholarships going to the winning team. Money smarts save the day!

    By the Numbers

    2/21/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    An image of Aloha StadiumCTAHR has been putting up some impressive numbers! The number of individuals who had contact with CTAHR in 2012 would fill Aloha Stadium 19 times. There are 303 CTAHR-certified Master Gardeners who assist schools and homeowners statewide. There are 1,600 acres of off-campus facilities servicing the community in 29 locations across the state. CTAHR reaches 75 people a day, every day, all year long. Find out more fabulous CTAHR numbers, facts, and highlights throughout the state in the new CTAHR in Focus publication.

    Calling All Abstracts

    2/21/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    The Student Research Symposium logo and imagesThe 26th Annual CTAHR Student Research Symposium will take place on April 11 and 12 in the Agricultural Science Building. The Symposium, which serves as a multidisciplinary forum for the discussion and exchange of information, is open to graduate and undergraduate students conducting scholarly work under the supervision of faculty in Manoa’s College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, College of Engineering, and Hilo’s College of Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resource Management. The deadline for submitting abstracts is March 11. Instructions on preparing and submitting abstracts and making presentations at the Symposium can be found on the Symposium website. If you have questions, please contact Felicia Geronimo (feliciar@hawaii.edu) or Charles Kinoshita (kinoshitac@ctahr.hawaii.edu). All students are encouraged to participate, so please set aside April 11 and 12. We look forward to seeing all of them and their awesome work at the 26th CTAHR Student Research Symposium!

    Curiosity Can Build a Farm

    2/21/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    The GoFarm Hawai‘i logoAre you curious about farming? Looking for a career or an opportunity to earn supplemental income farming sustainably? Leeward is hosting a free AgCurious seminar on the GoFarm Hawai‘i program on Tuesday, February 25, 5:30 p.m. at the GT building, room 105. Come hear successful O‘ahu farmers talk story about their start-up experiences the challenges and benefits of ag-centered lifestyles. Gain an understanding of the agriculture industry in Hawai‘i and its importance. Learn about the GoFarm Hawai‘i @ Leeward CC training program. GoFarm alumni will be on hand to talk about what’s great about the program. Call 455-0401 or email (linne@hawaii.edu) to confirm your attendance!

    Sweet, Sweet Sweet Potatoes

    2/21/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Sweet Potato Field DayThe Waimanalo Research Station rocked its Sweet Potato Field Day! More than 100 participants, including farmers from the Big Island and Kaua‘i, braved the rainy day for a chance to check out the many awesome varieties of sweet potatoes (‘uala), many of which are native Hawaiian varieties. ‘Uala is nutritious and delicious and has much to contribute to sustainability in the Islands, being a locally available source of carbohydrates in an area without the space for large fields of grain.

    Check Out These Bugs!

    2/19/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Visitors to the Insect MuseumThe University of Hawai‘i Insect Museum had a lovely celebration of Darwin’s birthday, which included specimen preparation, lots of demonstrations, a cake graced with Darwin's portrait, and some delicious chocolate-covered mealworms, crickets, and other bugs for the more adventurous gourmets. Visitors of all ages enjoyed the many beautiful specimens (both live and preserved) available for viewing, including Hawai‘i’s iconic pulelehua. Yay for insects, yay for Darwin!

    Love Blooms

    2/12/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Flowers and heartsFlowers are love! The UH Horticulture Society will hold their annual Valentine’s Day Sale, in St. John 10B, Friday, February 14, from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. or whenever all the flowers are sold out. All flowers are grown by local nurseries and include mini gerbera daisies, kalanchoe, mini roses, azaleas, and calla lilies. Come out and support local businesses and brighten up someone’s day (it could be your own!) with some lovely blossoms.

    Wow! ‘Uala!

    2/12/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Sweet PotatoesStill craving more after your Valentine’s Day candy? If you want sweet, check out sweet potatoes! The Waimanalo Experiment Station’s Organic Plots will feature the diversity of sweet potatoes (‘uala) in Hawai‘i on Saturday, February 15, 9:00 a.m.–12:00 noon. Visitors can see and taste nearly 70 varieties of sweet potatoes, the majority of which are native Hawaiian varieties. The field day is a chance to learn about the propagation of ‘uala, and how this crop can contribute to health and sustainability in Hawai‘i. For more information, contact the field station at 259-7201 or email Jay Bost (jbost@hawaii.edu). Mmmm, sweet potatoes.

    Name Badge Bling

    2/12/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    The CES Kahalui crew with CTAHR name badges
    Check out the Kahului CES crew rocking the new CTAHR name badges! Almost 350 badges were made for members of the CTAHR ‘ohana, and this swanky fashion accessory has been spotted at events all over the many campuses. CTAHR pride never goes out of style!

    Nutrition Online Excellence

    2/12/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Marie Fialkowski and her studentCongratulations to HNFAS’ Marie Fialkowski (right), whose online FSHN 185 course “The Science of Human Nutrition” was nominated for the UHM Excellence in Online Teaching Award. Nominated by students, Marie is among faculty teaching online courses considered to be demonstrating best practices. Marie is Assistant Program Director of the Children Healthy Living Program. Her students, who take the course via the Outreach College, are from across the Pacific, and may have limited science backgrounds. Working with Maria Stewart (HNFAS, left), Marie made changes to the online subject matter to reflect the unique content of diets and nutrition across the Pacific. This effort to meet the needs of these underserved students will, they hope, reduce the impacts of obesity and other chronic diseases in the Pacific region. Great job, Marie!

    Bugs Can Be Farm Friendly, Too

    2/5/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Robert Olivier and GrubbieBugs can contribute to sustainability! Robert Olivier will present the seminar “Why Farm Insects?” Thursday, February 6, 9:30–10:30 a.m. in AgSci 219. Robert Olivier is the founder and CEO of Prota Culture, LLC, a science-based small bio-tech business that is pioneering the design, development, and manufacturing of a sustainable insect-based production system to make local animal feed ingredients and biodiesel from organic wastes. Olivier’s goal is to reduce the amount of food waste disposed in landfills. Given enough food waste, one commercial BioPod™ produces as much protein from insects as an entire acre of land in California planted with soy. With these portable units, urban insect farmers could disrupt a $50 million food-waste disposal market on O'ahu while providing cheap, locally produced animal feed for poultry, fish, and pigs, thus making Hawai'i more self-reliant. Come hear more of his exciting ideas!

    DNA Is Everywhere

    2/5/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Image from Biotech in FocusThe new issue of Biotech in Focus is available! This issue, “Biotechnology Basics: DNA Goes to Work,” explores the meaning of “biotechnology” and discusses the many fields that benefit from DNA research. Subjects include medicine, industry, the environment, public safety, and agriculture. Download this issue of Biotech in Focus. Previous issues can be found on the Biotech in Focus webpage.

    Lovely, Lovely Lettuce

    2/5/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Red and green lettuceBe original this Valentine’s Day and give the gift of red lettuce instead of roses! The Poamoho Research Station will host a Green and Red Leaf Lettuce Field Day, a Pop-Up Tent Vegetable Science Education Event, on February 13, 9:00-10:30 a.m. At the request of aquaponic and hydroponic growers, Poamoho started evaluating lettuce varieties that could tolerate the heat on O‘ahu, though findings also have implications for farmers growing in the soil. The field day gives farmers the opportunity to “pop in” to see and evaluate the horticultural characteristics of more than 40 green and red lettuce cultivars. For more information, contact Jensen Uyeda (juyeda@hawaii.edu) or Jari Sugano (suganoj@ctahr.hawaii.edu) 622-4185.

    Keeping Student Bonds Strong

    2/5/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Student AmbassadorsAbout twenty Student Ambassadors met up on Saturday, January 25, for the CTAHR Student Ambassador Spring Retreat. They bonded and developed their leadership and communication skills through teambuilding activities headed by the Student Life and Development Office. Fun and useful exercises included the Ski Trolley, the Balance Beam, and Animal Sounds, each emphasizing creative thinking, trust, and team spirit. The retreat ended with a Mexican lunch. A big thanks to James Frizzell and Alycia Kiyabu from Student Life and Development for facilitating the morning teambuilding exercises. Also, mahalo to the Student Ambassadors for a productive, fun-filled retreat. Lastly, thank you to the Academic and Student Affairs Office for sponsoring this event. Great job, ambassadors!

    January



    Iron Does a Mommy Good

    1/29/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Alan Titchenal and Joannie DobbsLife with a new baby can be a challenge, but increased iron in the diet can really help. In a column in the Star Advertiser, Alan Titchenal and Joannie Dobbs (both HNFAS) explain the common problem of iron deficiency during and after pregnancy. Low iron, due to blood loss during birth, can cause both physical and mental postpartum issues including fatigue, anxiety, sleeping problems, decreased short-term memory, ADHD types of symptoms, and compromised immune function. The column discusses the issues of adequate iron consumption during and after pregnancy.

    Fashion Melding

    1/29/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    A Fighting Eel Matt Bruening fashion combinationIn a meeting of the unique, FDM alumni Lan Chung of Fighting Eel and Matt Bruening have joined their distinct styles for a fabulous new-year collection. Fighting Eel caters to career women and young mothers who want a modern look with comfort and quality, while Matt Bruening designs for the edgy, urban tomboy. Together their collection features Fighting Eel’s ease and day-to-night versatility and Matt Bruening’s sporty tops, seam-line details, raglan sleeves, and asymmetrical vented backs. The result is a stylish, comfortable collection that works for all hours. Read more at the Star Advertiser. And check out the styles at Fighting Eel and Matt Bruening!

    Eek! Ants!

    1/29/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Little Fire AntsKeep an eye out for new pests in town. The winter issue of the sustainable agriculture newsletter Hanai‘Ai features pest bulletins for the Little Fire Ant (LFA) and the Coconut Rhinoceros Beetle (featured in the January 17 CTAHR Notes). Over the holidays, a public report of a suspicious ant at a garden shop on Maui led to the confirmation that LFA colonies were present in hapu‘u logs imported from Hawai‘i island. These logs were for sale in multiple garden shops and nurseries on O‘ahu and Maui. Fire ants are a danger to the health of families, pets, the agriculture industry, and the local economy. Read more about LFA, how to detect them, and what to do if you spot any.

    Income and the Reading Gap

    1/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Children reading in schoolIn Hawai‘i and the rest of the U.S. young readers face a pretty hefty challenge: income. COF, the designated Hawai‘i KIDS COUNT grantee, collaborated with the Annie E. Casey Foundation on Early Reading Proficiency in the United States, a KIDS COUNT data snapshot. The publication finds that while there have been overall improvements in reading scores over the past decade, the gap between students from higher- and lower-income families is growing wider, and a large majority of children in the U.S. are not reading proficiently by the time they reach fourth grade. According to Hawai‘i KIDS COUNT project director Ivette Rodriguez Stern (COF), Hawai‘i’s trend is similar to the nation’s. While the share of students not proficient in reading remains slightly higher in Hawai‘i than nationally, the state has seen an overall improvement in proficiency levels, with 70% of fourth graders reading below proficiency in 2013 compared to 79% in 2003. Despite these overall improvements, disparities between income groups persist. Read more about it in the KIDS COUNT report.

    Cover Crops Up High

    1/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Cover CropsCome visit some cover crops in the sky! Or at least up high. The Lalamilo Research Station will hold a field day on Cover Crops for High Elevation in Hawai‘i on Wednesday, February 5, at 12 noon. Field day visitors will have an opportunity to learn about the benefits of cover crops and their “cocktail mix” and to view the growth of different cover crop mixtures at high elevation. The cover crop field trial was established in early December 2013, and its objectives are to collect data to develop a Cover Crop Calculator for Hawai‘i, and to evaluate the soil health improvement potential of cold climate cover crops. Guest speakers for the day are Archana Pant (TPSS) and Koon-Hui Wang (PEPS). For more information, contact Didi at 887-6183 or email (mddiaz@hawaii.edu).

    Woo Hoo! ‘Ulu!

    1/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    An ulu plant ready to be plantedInterested in growing breadfruit (‘ulu)? Learn all about it at the ‘Ulu Production and Agronomy Field Day, Wednesday, February 7, 1 p.m. at the Mililani Ag Park. Mark Nickum (TPSS) and other speakers will discuss propagation techniques, nutrient needs, irrigation requirements, field prep and spacing, sources for nursery stock, and pruning ‘ulu. A take-home planting guide and refreshments will be provided. RSVP by February 6 at 343-8196.

    Beyond Aloha Shirts

    1/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    The covers of Honolulu Street StyleAndrew Reilly (FDM) was recently interviewed on KITV and ThinkTech regarding his upcoming book Honolulu Street Style. Situated at the crossroads of different cultures, Honolulu has a style all of its own, he explains. Honolulu Street Style captures this unique approach as it demonstrates how global trends are transformed by stylish Honolulu denizens to create a unique, local look. Divided into chapters on hair, hats, accessories, and beachwear, the book features the styles of people encountered on the street and in many different neighborhoods, with an essay on the history and clothing of Hawai’i as a whole. Check out the book on Amazon, too!

    Muscles, Bones, and Milestones

    1/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Halina Zaleski, HNFAS Department Chair; Yong soo Kim, Researcher, and Jinzeng Yang, Associate Professor.Congratulations to HNFAS’ Yong-Soo Kim for 20 years of service and Jinzeng Yang for 10 years of service at the university! Both scientists study muscle development and molecular mechanisms and their applications to improving animal production efficiency. As animal scientists, they study efficient muscle growth critical to meat production, reduced feed efficiency, and environmental impacts. Jinzeng (right) and Yong-Soo (middle, pictured with department chair Halina Zaleski) work on the regulation of myostatin, a growth-differentiation factor that controls muscle mass. Whether it’s shrimp, fish, swine, or beef cattle, muscle growth appears to be controlled by different forms of myostatin. Mutations in myostatin genes can lead to significant muscle growth and thus increased meat production. With the understanding of myostatin, growth of muscle can be studied and made more efficient. Yong-Soo and Jinzeng also use animal models with depressed myostatin function and increased muscle mass to understand impacts of skeletal muscle on obesity and diabetes prevention. Enhanced skeletal muscle mass can be very effective in maintaining glucose homeostasis in both type I and type II diabetes. They are always looking for interested graduate students and scientists to work with them in this exciting subject of myostatin and skeletal muscle.

    Empowering Environmental Youth

    1/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Rebecca BeralasAlumna Rebecca Beralas (NREM) has been sharing the ideas of conservation and environmental education through her work as the program outreach coordinator for Kupu. The mission of Kupu is to empower youth to serve their communities through character-building, service learning, and environmental stewardship opportunities. Some of the highlights of Rebecca’s journey include internship programs, planning and leading large-scale environmental community service events, and having the opportunity to educate and mentor hundreds of environmentally minded young adults each year. She credits her professors Christopher Lepczyk and Creighton Litton (both NREM) for inspiring her through their thoroughness, knowledge, and ability to push students to do their best while sharing opportunities with them. And in her free time, Rebecca will be releasing her debut reggae album later this year. Go for it, Rebecca!

    Go, Go, Gardeners!

    1/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Kim PerryWhat better place for a garden than the Garden Isle? An article about the Kaua‘i Master Gardener Program appeared in Midweek Kauai, explaining the program and the classroom training as well as the volunteer responsibilities. Kaua‘i Master Gardener volunteers assist the university in its mission to deliver relevant, research-based, environmentally sound horticulture information to the public. Through community outreach and education, the university strives to promote sustainable gardening practices and environmental stewardship on Kaua‘i. Kim Perry, extension agent and Kaua‘i Master Gardener coordinator, will teach the introductory class, which covers gardening in Hawai‘i. Other teachers include Hector Valenzuela (PEPS) and Jonathan Deenik, Joe DeFrank, and Ted Radovich (all TPSS). Let's get out and plant responsibly!

    Memory Care

    1/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Allyson FujiiFinding a job in one’s field of interest can be tough, so FAMR graduate Allyson Fujii is delighted to be working in gerontology as the activities assistant at Belmont Village Assisted Living in San Jose, California. At the village, she cares for elderly residents with mild cognitive impairment in the memory care program called the Circle of Friends. Although her job comes with its challenges, she enjoys spending time and reminiscing with the residents. Allyson credits Michael Cheang and Lori Yancura (both FCS) with sharing the knowledge and advice that inspired her to live a goal-oriented life and take an interest in the aging population. Congratulations, Allyson!

    Breadfruit Work Honored

    1/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Diane Ragone with a breadfruit plantCTAHR collaborator and TPSS alumna Diane Ragone was selected as a Star of Oceania by the Pacific Business Center for her work as the director of the National Tropical Botanical Garden’s Breadfruit Institute. This honor comes on the heels of the November 15 announcement by the USDA that compounds in the male flowers of breadfruit are significantly more effective at repelling mosquitoes than DEET. These findings are the result of collaborative research conducted using NTBG’s breadfruit collection and published in a March 2012 paper co-authored by Diane. In October, the work of the Breadfruit Institute was featured in Science magazine. Congratulations, Diane!

    The Dr. B Fellowship

    1/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Dr. BAfter decades of teaching, mentoring, and research, plant breeder and corn guru James Brewbaker (TPSS) has given another gift to the college. He has established an endowed fellowship with outright and estate gifts totaling $1 million, the largest gift ever received by the University of Hawai‘i. The James L. Brewbaker endowed fellowship will assist full-time TPSS graduate students studying plant breeding. “The two billion people this world held when I was born in ’26 have sadly grown to more than seven billion, of whom one billion go to bed hungry,” said Dr. B. “My gift simply underscores my faith that plant breeding can, and indeed will have to contribute even more than it has in the past. No better place than University of Hawai‘i.” Learn more about Dr. B’s gift and watch him present it at KITV. Then check out photos of the event here and here. Mahalo nui loa, Dr. B!

    White Flower, Blue Ribbon

    1/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Hokuloa'Hokuloa', an anthurium developed by TPSS and PEPS, won a Blue Ribbon in the Society of American Florists' 2013 Outstanding Varieties Competition. The anthurium was entered by Hilo-based Green Point Nurseries, one of the state's largest cut flower producers and a longtime CTAHR collaborator. The bright white, heart-shaped 'Hokuloa' was named for the planet Venus, the morning and the evening star. A star is born!

    Cool Food Research

    1/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Meat with thermometerHNFAS’s Soojin Jun’s food storage and preservation research was recently featured on the front page of Ka Leo. Soojin and co-PI Peter Berkelman in the School of Engineering are working on new technology to minimize freezing damage to food due to water crystallization by manipulating the water’s electric and magnetic fields. The proposed technology will not require sequential freezing-thawing processes for long-term food storage, so food quality can be maintained as fresh without structural damage, such as drip loss, softening, and loss of valuable nutrients. The project received a three-year, $500,000 Improving Food Quality and Value grant through the National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

    Highway Gardens

    1/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Joe DeFrank and Paula AkanaThere are big plans for those empty patches of land along the highway. Turf specialist Joe DeFrank, postdoctoral researcher Orville Baldos and doctoral candidate Scott Lukas (all TPSS) were featured on KITV for their work introducing native plants to unused land along the highways. The project, coordinated with the Department of Transportation, aims to reduce soil erosion and battle invasive species by planting native species along the H1, as well as use the land along the highway to create seed farms for future plants.

    Kaka‘ako Kalo

    1/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Andrew Dedrick, center, with Nate Ortiz, left, and Mitchell Loo among taro plantsAny place can be a farm, even a strip of dirt in a parking lot. Urban Farm Hawai‘i, founded by TPSS student Andrew Dedrick, is transforming land along the Kaka‘ako thoroughfare into an urban taro patch. Mitchell Loo and Nate Ortiz (also TPSS students) and volunteers spent a weekend planting more than 500 donated dryland taro plants in a patch of land fronting the former CompUSA building. The project is short term since the entire area is slated for redevelopment, but Urban Farm Hawai‘i expects the crop to yield lu‘au leaves and at least one harvest of taro. Read the Star Advertiser article here.

    International Aquaponics Connections

    1/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Dean Gallo, Chancellor Apple, members of the Horimasa delegationDean Maria Gallo celebrated an international collaboration between MBBE’s aquaponics initiative, local farmers, local and State agencies, and the Japanese Horimasa Corporation at an event held at Mari’s Garden last November 18. The collaboration is looking to develop and refine aquaponics technology that will reduce water use and create a “two for one” harvest of both fish and food crops. Led by MBBE’s Clyde Tamaru and Bradley “Kai” Fox, the researchers have been working on a project to design a mobile, controlled-environment production facility to produce local, sustainable, and organic food. MBBE alumni Scott Shibata and Ryo Kubota of Diagenetix are also working with Horimasa on future food security-related projects. The event was attended by Chancellor Tom Apple, Governor Abercrombie, and members of the Horimasa Corp. Check out more photos of the evening. A big mahalo to Clyde’s student Domenick Barbo for his assistance in publicizing the event!

    Oh, No! More Invasive Pests!

    1/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    A coconut rhinoceros beetleThe coconut rhinoceros beetle was detected on O'ahu during routine surveys conducted under a cooperative agreement between CTAHR and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Plant Protection & Quarantine. The beetle was discovered at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam on Dec. 23. Since the discovery, the Hawai‘i Department of Agriculture (HDOA) and the USDA-PPQ have been working jointly with the military and CTAHR to survey and conduct trapping activities to determine the extent of the infestation. So far, nine adult beetles have been trapped. HDOA has more information on the identification of the coconut rhinoceros beetle and what to do if you see one.

    Golden Years, CTAHR Style

    1/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Image of cover of 4th quarter Impact ReportThe previous quarter’s Impact Report looked at the ways CTAHR reaches out to the youth of the state, so it’s only right that the 4th Quarter Impact Statement, now available online and in print, focuses on the college’s work on behalf of Hawai‘i’s seniors. Get inspired by stories of extension projects helping grandparents caring for grandchildren, eating and lifestyle tips for healthy aging, and the Center on the Family’s database of publications and statistics on Hawai‘i’s elderly!

    Biotech Fun

    1/28/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    The Biotech in Focus publicationThe new Biotech in Focus series, begun this month by the Biotechnology Outreach Program under Ania Wieczorek, offers a general overview of biotechnology news and issues. The subjects covered in this series range from basic biological aspects to complex societal issues, including safety of biotech products, environmental compatibility, needs of modern agriculture, opinion pieces, and much, much more. Biotech in Focus will be published twice a month, with each bulletin presented in accessible form and providing pertinent science-based information in a non-technical and fun format. Read the first issue of Biotech in Focus, featuring DNA, what it is, and how it works, at the website.

    Keep Calm and Learn about Tea

    1/22/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Tea Field DayYay Team Tea! CTAHR’s Tea Project, Risk Management Hawai‘i, and the LIFE program are presenting the popular Tea 101: Production and Processing Basics on Wednesday, February 12, 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the Mealani Research Station. Led by Randy Hamasaki (PEPS) and Stuart Nakamoto (HNFAS), the workshop will give participants the chance to explore the possibilities of tea as a new crop in the Islands, including market feasibility, tea varieties, crop management, harvesting techniques, and evaluation of the final product. Randy and Stuart will also share current tea research conducted at the Mealani Station. Space is limited to 12 participants, so call 877-6183 or email mddiaz@hawaii.edu to reserve your spot.

    Welcome Back

    1/22/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Participants at NREM Welcome Back BreakfastThe CTAHR ‘ohana celebrated the new year and a fresh semester with NREM’s Welcome Back Breakfast on January 17 in the Sherman Courtyard. NREM served approximately 50 participants a continental breakfast of bagels, muffins, fruits, coffee, tea, and orange juice. One of the most common themes that was raised at every CTAHR strategic planning activity last year was the need for more socializing at the college level. This theme really resonated with the staff and faculty in the NREM Department, and they decided to host what they hope will be the first of many departmental social events this year. A big mahalo is due to organizers (left to right) Chi Ming (Lawrence) Chan, Donna Ching (FCS), Catherine Chan-Halbrendt, and Debbie Wong! What a great way to start the new year!

    Let Us Consider Lettuce

    1/22/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Romaine LettuceThe Poamoho Research Station held a Romaine Lettuce Observational Field Day on January 21, just ahead of the harvest scheduled for later in the week. The demonstration showcased more than 20 varieties of Romaine lettuce as part of a replicated field trial, and visitors were able to see the horticultural characteristics of the lettuce samples. Identification of promising new Romaine lettuce varieties for commercial production can minimize Hawai‘i’s dependence on mainland imports, and implications from previous replicated field studies suggest Romaine can be grown successfully on O‘ahu. Go, Team Romaine!

    Sustainability and Tradition

    1/22/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Tetzuzan "Benny" RonJoannie Dobbs and Alan Titchnal interviewed Tetsuzan “Benny” Ron (all are HNFAS) about food production and environmental sustainability in their Star Advertiser column. Benny stresses the need to learn from traditional Hawaiian agricultural practices and to incorporate native Hawaiian ideas into new technologies. He identifies core concepts as the conservation and preservation of our water supply, food production, and a respect for the Hawaiian culture, and explains his use of environmentally friendly aquaponics technologies and how the combination of aquaculture and hydroponics can be sustainable as well as economical.

    The Perfect Time to Plant and Prune

    1/17/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Lorraine BrooksWhile other parts of the country are freezing, it’s the right time in Hawai‘i to attend to those urban gardens. In an article in the Star Advertiser, Lorraine Brooks (TPSS) has advice for pruning ornamental shrubs and trees, as well as which vegetables can be planted in the Hawai‘i winter. She also offers tips on how to identify and control garden pests. Get those gardens revved up!

    Where and What Did You Spray When?

    1/17/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Image of pesticide use and record keepingCTAHR’s Risk Management Hawai‘i presents the workshop Recordkeeping Requirements for the Worker Protection Standard and Restricted Use Pesticides Regulation, Thursday, January 23, 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm at the Waimea Civic Center conference room. Proper recordkeeping concerning pesticide use helps agricultural owners, employers, and managers better manage their production, labor, marketing, legal, and financial risks. Good recordkeeping is also a prerequisite for crop insurance and disaster assistance. Workers, pesticide applicators, agricultural growers, owners, employers, and managers will learn how to be compliant and how to implement the WPS requirements, thereby minimizing their risk of noncompliance and citations. Please bring your pesticide card to get 1.0 credit toward pesticide recertification (upon approval with HDOA). To RSVP, please call Didi or Perci at 887-6183 or email mddiaz@hawaii.edu by January 22.

    Helping Farms, Helping Hawai‘i

    1/6/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Dean Maria GalloDean Maria Gallo’s op-ed “Helping local farms more important than ever” was recently published in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser. In it, Dean Gallo stresses the importance of local agriculture for the state’s food security and explains how government investment in prime agricultural lands and infrastructure will reduce Hawai‘i’s dependence on outside food sources. She recommends investing in research, communication, outreach, and innovative collaboration. Read the entire piece here.

    Go, Go, Costume Funding!

    1/6/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Costume collection imageThe crowdfunding campaign for FDM’s Historic Costume Collection has broken $1,600! Spread the word about the awesome assemblage of historically and culturally irreplaceable (not to mention gorgeous!) items and the campaign to keep it going! There’s just under a month left to make the goal of $10,000, which will allow the Collection’s curators to conserve and display these fabulous pieces.

    Intergenerational Relationships

    1/6/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    Faculty Candidate imageJenjira Yahirun, candidate for the position of COF assistant researcher in social demography, will present the seminar “Intergenerational Relationships Across the Lifespan” on Tuesday, January 14, 10:30 a.m. in Miller 101. The seminar is open to interested members of the CTAHR community and is eminently relevant to Hawai‘i’s high rate of multi-generational households.

    CTAHR's Great, So Nominate!

    1/6/2014  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


    CTAHR Banquet logoReady to start a new year and to nominate some candidates for the CTAHR Awards Banquet? The official start date for nomination submission is Tuesday, January 21, and information on the nomination process is available on the Awards Banquet website. The nomination deadline for the Outstanding Alumnus/Alumna award is January 31, and the deadline for nominations for the six faculty/staff awards is February 20. The awards are Excellence in Teaching, in Research, and in Extension; Outstanding Civil Service and Service by an APT Employee; and the Alvin T. and Charlotte C. Nakamura Hoku Award for an Individual with Administrative Potential.