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2016


February



Extending a Helping Hand With Funding

2/3/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Kelvin Sewake and donorsInterim Associate Dean for Extension Kelvin Sewake addressed his vision for agriculture as the invited keynote speaker at the 68th HFNA/HFSA Shinnenkai on January 9 at the Hilo Hawaiian Hotel. It was announced at the meeting that he had established a UH Foundation Discretionary Account for Extension, to provide the Associate Dean of Extension with funds for Extension-related activities such as workshops, conferences, supplies, training, fees, equipment, travel, awards, honorarium, etc. This account will be especially useful for expenditures that are not covered by grants and will allow for Extension professional improvement, to conduct educational programs for our industry and communities, and to recognize Extension faculty for their accomplishments. A total of $5,000 was donated by (left to right) Hawaii Tropical Flower Council, represented by Thong Teng Neo; Hawaii Floriculture and Nursery Association and Greenpoint Nurseries, represented by Eric Tanouye; Kelvin Sewake; Big Island Plant & Foliage, represented by Dalen Kawakami; and Kohala Nursery, represented by Dawn Kitagawa. Kelvin established the account using $1,000 of his personal funds and expressed appreciation to the other donors for the generous help that will go towards enhancing CTAHR’s Extension programs. Anyone interested in donating to the fund can contact Kelvin.

How Much Does Sending Money Home Cost?

2/3/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Person at Western UnionJenjira Yahirun (COF) and her colleague Eliva Ambugo have a new publication in Demographic Research: “Remittances and Risk of Major Depressive Episode and Sadness Among New Legal Immigrants to the United States.” Their research found that new immigrants to the US were at higher risk of a major depressive episode if they sent money back home (“remittances”), versus those who didn’t, perhaps because of the associated financial stress this caused. This was particularly true of those who were refugees/asylum seekers, as opposed to employment-seeking migrants. This analysis of a large national dataset illuminates the intersection of mental health, economic stability, and family ties.

Give Your Honey a Honeycreeper!

2/3/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Akohekohe honeycreeper plush toyAn ‘akohekohe (Maui crested honeycreeper) plush toy, that is. Make some beautiful music this Valentine’s Day with these beautiful and charming limited-edition plush birds, which play a recording of the ‘akohekohe’s song. Their sale helps benefit the NREM GSO and the Maui Forest Bird Recovery Project. They’re only $15 (cash only)—just go to the NREM GSO webpage to get one.

January



Who Judges the Livestock?

1/26/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


4-H livestock judging teamOne of the top honors a Hawai‘i 4-H livestock member can achieve is to earn a spot on the Hawaii State 4-H Livestock Judging team. This year’s team members were (left to right) Jacob Cabiles, Cullen Andrade, Kanani Kaaekuahiwi, and Terri Connors, who braved the freezing weather in Denver, Colorado, for a chance to learn, show their skills, and have fun. Jacob’s from O‘ahu; the rest are from the Big Island. After competing at the State 4-H livestock judging contest on O‘ahu, these four top contestants won bragging rights to represent Hawai‘i at the National Western Stockshow’s junior livestock judging contest. The contest is a part of the 96th Annual Western National Roundup, the second-longest-running National 4-H event, drawing nearly 1,000 delegates from 31 state and Alberta, Canada. The delegates engaged in educational programs, opportunities in leadership and citizenship skill development, and youth exchange activities and were exposed to a multitude of national contests. In addition to the Roundup event, the team members got to hone their judging skills prior to the contest at the University of Wyoming Laramie Research and Extension Center and at Colorado State University’s B.W. Pickett Equine Center. They also participated in one of the nation’s top quality youth livestock judging contests and enjoyed the livestock

Spreading Like…Wildfire

1/26/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Wildland fire in HawaiiThe work Clay Trauernicht and Creighton Litton (both NREM) have been doing to quantify the effects of wildfire in Hawai‘i has received some good coverage in Hawaii News Now, Hawaii Public Radio, and the Star-Advertiser. Clay and Creighton show not only that wildfires are a serious problem in the Islands, burning approximately the same percentage of land area every year as in the western United States, but that unlike on the Mainland, here wildland fires are overwhelmingly caused by human activities. The good news? That means we’ve got more power to reduce their number and severity. The old saying from Smokey the Bear is even more true in Hawai‘i—so get out and prevent some forest (and grassland) fires!

Step Right Up—to Fun

1/26/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Spring Event 2016Life’s a carnival…so act like it at CTAHR’s Spring Event, which will be held on Friday, February 5, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. in the grassy area next to Gilmore Hall. There will be great refreshments, carnival games with prizes, a caricature artist, and more…all just for the price of your smiling face! Come by and grab some popcorn, and remember—all is Fair!




Bioenergy in Germany

1/21/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Surendra KC in labSurendra KC (MBBE), a PhD student under Samir Khanal, has been awarded a highly competitive and prestigious German Academic Exchange (DAAD) Research fellowship to conduct research at the University of Hohenheim, Stuttgart, Germany, for a period of five months starting January 2016. Surendra will conduct anaerobic digestion studies of energy crops for bioenergy and bio-based products generation. This study aims to add new knowledge to the fundamental understanding of the digestion of energy crops. In addition, this research visit will also strengthen the research collaborations between UHM and the University of Hohenheim, to help UH establish a Tropical Anaerobic Digestion Research Program (TADRP). Surendra was also a recipient of UK Energy Research Centre (UKERC), London, UK fellowship in 2013 to attend the UKERC Summer School at University of Warwick, Coventry, UK. Go, Surendra!

Be the Boss of Your Money

1/21/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


TCYM money tree logoNeed to gain some financial savvy? Tune in to Take Charge of Your Money4, a special series of financial literacy videos broadcast on local television and embedded at the TCYM website to assist ordinary consumers improve their understanding and develop skills at effectively managing the family resources of their households. The Cooperative Extension Service, FCS, and UH’s Information Technology Services, Academic Technologies have collaborated with many local professionals to organize this sixteen-part series as a community service program. Each particular topic, such as investing or money-management tips for young adults, is covered by 4–6 shows created in one-hour slots for television viewing. You can watch all the shows on local television each semester on channels 354 or 355, watch all the shows on the website 24/7, view the PowerPoint presentations of all the speakers, view additional resources for each topic via website links, and test your knowledge of the content presented by participating on the Self-Test Quiz section of this website. Isn’t it time you took charge?

A Look Into the Future

1/21/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Mark BittmanFormer New York Times food writer Mark Bittman, author of the How to Cook Everything Cookbook series and Vegan before 6, will be speaking on “The Future of Food” at UH Manoa’s Architecture Auditorium on Thursday, February 18, at 6:00 p.m. The event is free. Mr. Bittman recently left the New York Times to establish his own organization, The Purple Carrot, which sells ready-to-cook vegan meals delivered directly to the home. His talk is co-sponsored by CTAHR and should be very enlightening.

Glad to Have Them: January 2016

1/13/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Skip Bittenbender with cacao treesA number of members of the CTAHR ‘ohana are celebrating important milestones in service: Skip Bittenbender (TPSS, pictured), king of kava and cacao, has been working his magic with fruit and beverage crops for 30 years. Four others have reached the all-important decade mark: Soojin Jun (HNFAS), most recently lauded for his supercooling technology that keeps food fresh without freezing; Mark Kubo, an agricultural research technician at the Maui Agricultural Research Station in Kula; Priscilla Roque, office manager of the Kamuela Extension Office on the Big Island, who keeps everything running smoothly; and Sarah Yuan (COF), whose work focusing on Hawai‘i’s homeless and aging populations has brought her acclaim. CTAHR’s all the better for their smarts, talents, and hard work!

Fun at the Farm Fair

1/13/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


4-H kids at 2015 Farm FairThis year’s Farm Fair at Kualoa Ranch was the subject of a laudatory article in the December issue of the Hana Hou, the magazine of Hawaiian Airlines. Much of the article, and its pictures, is devoted the 4-H livestock events. The UH Honeybee Project, and its bee-costumed student representatives, is also mentioned. Of these, and the many other agricultural educational events, the author comments, “Kids are definitely learning plenty all over today’s fair.” And that’s what the fun is all about!

Three Plus Two Equals Success

1/13/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Yong Li and Food Science MS studentsAfter two years of hard work, the first 3+2 Masters Program in CTAHR has enrolled international students. Two new students from China’s Hunan Agricultural University (HAU), Junhuang (Peter) Liu and Zhijun Zhan (middle and right), have arrived on campus and are eager to embark on a new academic journey at UH Manoa. These students, selected for their educational background and English proficiency, have completed three years of coursework in Food Science and Engineering at HAU and will spend their fourth and fifth years pursing master’s degrees in the Food Science MS program. Under the 3+2 program, during the next two years, the students will earn bachelor’s degrees from their home institution in China and master’s degrees from UH Manoa upon completion of their degree requirements. Many individuals at HAU and in CTAHR were instrumental in this significant milestone, including Yong Li (left), graduate chair of the Food Science MS program, HNFAS’s Ching Yuan Hu, the Food Science graduate faculty, and HNFAS chair Halina Zaleski, as well as Xiaoxin (Ivy) Mu of UHM’s Office of Graduate Education. This represents a major milestone in CTAHR’s goal to grow its graduate programs and become truly global. Also furthering those ends, the college is recruiting students for 3+2 programs that have been recently established with other international partner institutions.

What They Eat When They’re on Their Own

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Jinan BannaIn collaboration with a multi-state team of researchers, Jinan Banna (HNFAS) has published a paper entitled “Influence of parenting practices on eating behaviors of early adolescents during independent eating occasions: implications for obesity prevention” in the journal Nutrients. Early adolescents consume foods and beverages during eating occasions that occur with and without parental supervision, it explains. Parents may influence eating behaviors of early adolescents during eating occasions when they are present or during independent eating occasions by engaging in practices that affect availability of foods and beverages, and through perceived normative beliefs and expectations for intake. The article describes the influence of parenting practices on eating behaviors in general and when specifically applied to independent eating occasions of early adolescents. This information may be used to inform parenting interventions targeting obesity prevention among early adolescents focusing on independent eating occasions.

What to Eat and How to Eat It

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Maria StewartMaria Stewart (HNFAS) has been making some important nutrition pronouncements lately. She is quoted in a recent KHON news story on the World Health Organization’s pronouncement that processed meats cause colon cancer. She provides a note of moderation, emphasizing that meat still does offer many health benefits, including vitamins and minerals like zinc, and that it’s fine to cut down on meat without giving it up entirely. Her other recent pronouncement is much weightier: she was invited to co-author the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Position Paper on the Health Implications of Dietary Fiber. This evidence-based position paper represents the view of the Academy and will be a resource for health professionals and researchers. It’s a big honor to be asked to speak for this august body of nutrition scholars...and Maria is just the right person to do it.

Ears Over the Years

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Corn at Waimanalo StationAn extensive review of 50 years of corn breeding at CTAHR has been published recently. Entitled “Breeding Tropical Vegetable Corns,” it was written by James Brewbaker and Aussie colleague Ian Martin for the journal Plant Breeding Reviews 39:125-198. Dr B writes with admiration of the contributions of many of his 52 PhD and MS graduates working on the genetics and improvement of corn. Best known locally for supersweet “Kahuku-corns,” CTAHR research has focused on creating high tolerance to pests, diseases, and stresses unique to the tropics. A set of 1200 different varieties bred here is stored in CTAHR’s Hawaii Foundation Seeds center and runs the gamut from supersweet to mochi to popcorn to silage. The authors remind readers that the most common vegetable corn in the tropics is still “field corn,” with number 2 being the mochi (waxy) corn common in Asia. But “Hawaiian Supersweets” are rapidly gaining ground, notably in Southeast Asia, where ice cream and supersweet-corn milk are favored products.

Secrets of Pineapple Unlocked!

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Bob Paull and Nancy ChenNancy Chen and Robert Paull (both TPSS) were part of the international team that has sequenced the genes in the pineapple genome. Their role was in the characterization of the genes involved in sugar and cell-wall metabolism, and they were previously involved in the international sequencing efforts for papaya, Asian pear, and sacred lotus. The pineapple team was led by a graduate of TPSS, Dr. Ray Ming, now a professor at the University of Illinois, whose major advisor in TPSS was James Brewbaker. The paper reporting the results of this international sequencing effort appeared in the latest on-line issue of Nature Genetics. Pineapple has unique traits that have made it a subject of much research: it has an alternate photosynthetic pathway that concentrates carbon dioxide during the night when water loss is less, leading to high water-use efficiency. The plant also has a unique flower induction method, which means that plants can be made to flower throughout the year. The species is also of scientific interest as a reference for the evolution of genes in grasses.

To Label or Not to Label?

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Broccoli labeled GMO FreeThe latest Biotech in Focus newsletter discusses the controversy surrounding mandatory and voluntary labeling of foods and other products containing GMOs. It points out that the majority of Americans surveyed are in favor of labeling, but it also argues that such labeling may keep consumers from buying GM foods if they consider them to be less safe, and that for places like Hawai‘i such laws might keep certain manufacturers from shipping to the state. "Questions of whether and how GM foods might be labeled in the United States," concludes the author, "are far from being resolved." Check out this and previous newsletters at the Biotech in Focus website.

UH Mag-nificent

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Dean Gallo in UH MagazineThe latest UH Magazine has CTAHR written all over it. Dean Gallo and Sarah Yuan (COF) are two of the experts consulted for the issue’s “Hawai‘i Wants to Know” article, offering their insights into the possibility of the Islands’ food sustainability and the demographics of the state’s homeless population, respectively. The GoFarm program is represented by an item on one of its alumni, Rob Barreca. And there’s also a CTAHR ad featuring six students or recent alumni!

A Lush Book for Dry Climes

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Rangoon CreeperFormer CTAHR horticulture professor Fred Rauch is co-author, along with Paul Weissich, of a new book on xeriscape landscaping in the tropics from UH Press. The book, Plants for the Tropical Xeriscape: A Gardener’s Guide, is reviewed by fellow former professor and alumna Heidi Bornhorst in the Star-Advertiser. Her enthusiastic review especially commends the wealth of helpful and beautiful pictures in the book and its discussion of rare or under-used plants, like the Rangoon creeper (pictured). The book has also checked all the plants listed for weediness or invasive characteristics. It sounds like a book that belongs on the local gardener’s bookshelf!

Diet for an Island Community

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


2015 class of UH CTAHR dietetic internsCTAHR welcomes its third class of dietetic interns! The UH CTAHR Dietetic Internship provides graduates of a didactic program in Dietetics with an opportunity to increase their knowledge of food and nutrition science and to acquire competencies needed to practice dietetics in a variety of settings including clinical, food service, and community. It is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics of the National Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, requires 1200 hours of experience, and qualifies graduates to take the Registered Dietitian's Exam. The internship, which focuses on Hawai’i’s unique community, promotes education of students in the multicultural environment, service in a variety of community settings, and participation in various professional organizations. Pictured are lecturer Amy Tousman (left), internship director Ann Ditzler (right), and the 2015 Dietetic Intern Class: Leah Tamura, Isaiah Mar, Kasey Kawamoto, Sandi Kim, and Maile Ishikawa (left to right).

Passion for Fashion in Santa Fe

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Gabrielle Sanehira with two awardsThree garments and a research project produced by four FDM alumnae were presented at the 2015 International Textile and Apparel Association (ITAA) Conference in Santa Fe. ITAA is the biggest international textile and apparel professional association. This year, 123 undergraduate designs from international and national fashion universities were submitted, and just over a quarter were accepted and presented. Gabrielle Sanehira (pictured) had two garments in the ITAA Design Exhibition. She won the ATEXINC Award for Excellence in Marketable Textile Design for her “Collected, Cut and Recreated Dress,” an eco-friendly dress made out of recycled American Spirit cigarette boxes. She also won second place for the Cotton Incorporated Innovations in Cotton Design Award for her “Ortho-Litho Film” garment, which employed traditional analog photography and chemistry technology with ortho-litho film. Ayaka Hosomi’s garment “Legacy: The Past to the Present and Men to Women” was also presented in the ITAA Design Exhibit, and Su Lun Guth and Caitlen Schmidt’s research project entitled “Omni-Channel Purchase Journey With Multi-Device Paths” was presented in the ITAA Research Presentation session. Congratulations to all for their great achievements, including their professor, Ju-Young Kang! Professor Andrew Reilly also served as the ITAA’s vice president of scholarship.

A Ringing Endorsement of Moringa

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


MoringaCTAHR represented Hawai‘i at the symposium “Moringa oleifera: A Decade of Advances in Research and Development” held in Manila, Philippines, from November 15 to18. This first international symposium on the important multipurpose tree brought together 300 scientists from the international community. Ted Radovich (TPSS), Russell Nagata (O‘ahu county), John McHugh (DuPonte Pioneer), Glenn Teves (TPSS), Amjad Ahmad (TPSS), and Robert Paull (TPSS) gave an invited talk, “Germplasm evaluation and selection of Moringa oleifera in Hawai‘i,” one of over 100 presentations focusing on the horticulture, processing, and use of the tree. And if you don’t have any moringa, or kalamungay, in your own yard, consider planting one of these graceful trees—they’re lovely and very useful!

Much-Deserved Recognition

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Richard Criley with plumeriaIn a recent newsletter, the American Society for Horticultural Science recognized TPSS faculty members who have been dedicated and valued members of ASHS for 25 years or more: Richard Criley (pictured, with plumeria), Robert Paull, Kent Kobayashi, Joe DeFrank, “Skip” Bittenbender, Ken Leonhardt, and Susan Miyasaka. All these faculty members deserve a big mahalo for setting a standard for aspiring horticulturists in TPSS. In the same newsletter, TPSS master’s student Tiare Silvasy was honorably welcomed as a new ASHS member. Way to go, CTAHR and TPSS!

Down With Downy Mildew!

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


CTAHR basil field dayKeeping basil healthy is a continuing problem for growers, but CTAHR’s on the job. O‘ahu CES has been working with Janice Uchida, Mike Kawate, Miaoying Tian, Chris Kadooka, Julie Coughlin, and James Kam (all PEPS), as well as Hawai‘i’s IR-4 Program and agricultural chemical companies on O‘ahu, to develop solutions to manage basil downy mildew (BDM) and a new pathogen that’s believed to be Stemphylium vesicarium. CTAHR conducted replicated field trials that show that a rotation of crop-protection chemicals such as Quadris, Fosphite, Trilogy (O), and Regalia (O) can minimize BDM. Other CTAHR research trials, as well as a review of literature and growers’ testimonials, suggest that control of Stemphylium pre-harvest is extremely difficult with the current list of products registered for use on basil in Hawai‘i and that using irradiation as a post-harvest tool has potential. See the recent Impact story on CTAHR and basil as well!

Illustrious Alums

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


CTAHR alumniCTAHR was recently highlighted at the Inaugural Chancellor’s Alumni Thought Leaders Spotlight hosted at College Hill by the UH Foundation. Manoa Chancellor Robert Bley-Vroman began the festivities by proclaiming, “Tonight we celebrate the achievements and knowledge of our invited alumni in the food and farming sectors. UH Manoa has a long and proud history of food and farming innovations, partnering with our staff, students and alumni. For over 100 years, the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources (CTAHR), has been at the forefront of agriculture.” CTAHR alumni pictured here with Chancellor Bley-Vroman and Dean Gallo include Interim Associate Dean for Extension Kelvin Sewake, Fred Lau of Mari’s Garden, landscaping consultant Heidi Bornhorst, former Associate Dean for Extension Barry Brennan, and Diane Ragone, director of the Breadfruit Institute and 2015 CTAHR Outstanding Alumna.

The Navy vs. the Mosquito

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Liza GerardoPEPS alumna Liza Gerardo, now an officer in the Navy, was recently featured on KHON2 news to discuss the Navy’s role in helping to combat the spread of dengue fever in the Islands. Liza completed an MS in Entomology with Helen Spafford and is using her degree in her position in the Navy Environmental and Preventive Medicine Unit, surveying the mosquito species that are in Hawai‘i by means of light and odor traps. She offers these tips to keep mosquitoes away: drain any standing water from pet bowls or plant pots, throw away trash and other containers that may catch water, make sure screens are present and undamaged, keep grass short and hedges trimmed, and use DEET or other insect repellents when outside.

Celebrating a Milestone

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


CTAHR winter 2015 ConvocationApproximately 200 CTAHR students and their families and friends, along with CTAHR faculty and staff, attended CTAHR’s Fall 2015 Convocation. This celebration, co-emceed by Lisa Kitagawa-Akagi and Irene Morrow, began with congratulatory remarks from Dean Maria Gallo and CTAHR Alumni Association and Friends President Kauahi Perez. The Fall 2015 student marshals, Marie-Guillen Guillermo and Lena Phomsouvanh (both FAMR), selected for their academic achievements, leadership, and service to CTAHR and the university, were then recognized. Afterwards, graduating students active in CTAHR-affiliated student organizations were acknowledged for their participation. The ceremony concluded with the individual recognition of 25 graduates, followed by refreshments and mingling. Congratulations to the graduating students for achieving such a milestone! Good luck in your future endeavors! A big mahalo goes to all who supported the students: to SAPFB for partially funding the event, CTAHR Alumni Association and Friends and UH Alumni Association for support and promotional items given to graduating students, Steven and Karen Sato for donating lei, CTAHR scholarship recipients and student ambassadors for volunteering at the event, and ASAO for providing CTAHR memorabilia for the graduates and organizing this event.

What to Do With Wild Horses

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Wild horsesDan Rubinoff (PEPS) and Christopher Lepczyk (formerly of NREM, now at Auburn University) have published an op-ed in Slate on wild horses that was the third most shared piece. The authors argue that despite the public perception of the “wild”—actually feral—horses of the west as symbols of the beauty of untamed nature, these horses are actually introduced and invasive species that are degrading and destroying the true native species of their habitats and should be controlled. The article is certainly getting readers thinking and talking!

How to Be a Tree

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Person with tree rootsRetired Extension agent Norm Bezona suggests in his most recent column for the Hawaii Tribune-Herald that in order to appreciate our deep kinship and interdependence with trees, readers should attempt to “be a tree”: to think like one of these tall growing creatures and thus, hopefully, treat them better. For instance, when preparing to prune a tree, Norm reminds us to think about the last time we got a haircut: “The barber was not supposed to cut off your head, just trim your hair” (!). In other words, don’t prune too drastically. Find out more ways to be a tree here! It’s a great exercise.

Nalo Mele

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Ted Radovich and Ken LeonhardtTed Radovich and Ken Leonhardt, specialists at the Waimanalo Research Station, represented CTAHR’s holiday spirit in fine style at the Waimanalo Christmas Parade, driving in a “certified-organic” tractor loaded with gifts and an antique Ford that reminded onlookers how long CTAHR’s been making life better for the community.

Got a Problem? Engineer a Solution!

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


BE students at presentationDan Jenkins’s (MBBE) class BE 420, Sensors and Instrumentation for Biological Systems, presented some novel solutions to agricultural issues at their end-of-semester showcase. Projects included a water-based self-servicing mosquito trap, an automated coffee cherry sorter, a field-friendly cartridge for concentrating bacteria in samples, and wireless systems for controlling and acquiring data using BE lab equipment. For each project, students researched the problem, assembled prototypes, discussed manufacturing costs, created the instrument, and then finally presented it to an admiring audience. Now we’re just waiting for these handy devices to go into production!

Up in Gilmore

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Andy Hashimoto with Rochelle Hashimoto and Dean Gallo at portrait unveilingFormer Dean Andy Hashimoto was honored at his recent portrait unveiling. His portrait is now hanging proudly on the wall amongst other past deans on the second floor of Gilmore Hall. Andy served as dean from 2000 to 2010 before returning to his position as professor in MBBE and director for the Western Insular Pacific Sun Grant Subcenter, tasked with researching feedstocks for biofuels to reduce the Islands’ dependency on imported fossil fuels.