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2016


August



Get Extended!

8/29/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Ag ExtensionCTAHR is advertising four permanent, tenure-track junior or assistant Extension agent positions. They were funded from the Hawaii State Legislature via passage of the UH Manoa Budget request this past session, so a big mahalo goes to our UH officials and our legislators for their support! There is a position on Kaua‘i in invasive species with emphasis on insects and diseases in support of edible crop and ornamental industries; on O‘ahu in farm food safety and sustainable agriculture in support of edible crop industries; on Maui in farm food safety and sustainable agriculture in support of edible crop industries; and on the Big Island in sustainable agriculture in support of edible crop industries; this individual will also coordinate the East Hawaii Master Gardener program.

Tropical Students Unite!

8/29/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Tropical Plant Pathology grad students and Florida visitorsGrad students in Tropical Plant Pathology recently hosted four visiting graduate students from the University of Florida, Gainesville, for a mutual sharing of their research projects. The visiting students enjoyed their visit to the Manoa campus as well as lunch with the CTAHR students and several faculty. There’s a distinct Florida-CTAHR connection: besides former Dean Gallo’s employment there, several of CTAHR’s Tropical Plant Pathology graduates are now faculty at the Universit of Florida, including David Norman and Mathews Paret, and another, Kishore Day, works in Gainesville at the Florida Department of Plant Industries.

Dealing With the Pigs

8/29/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Feral pigMelissa Price (NREM assistant professor) and Jeremy Ringma (NREM postdoctoral fellow) recently received funding from the DLNR’s Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW) to identify optimal management strategies for feral pigs for conservation and recreational hunting purposes on O’ahu. Feral pigs are managed by DOFAW both as game animals for hunters and as invasive species that cause damage to watersheds and promote the spread of invasive plants and disease. Melissa and Jeremy will use a structured decision-making process to minimize conflict between competing hunter and conservation goals. They are currently deploying motion-activated cameras at more than 40 sites throughout O’ahu to map pig abundance and quantify disturbance in different habitat types.

Positively Negi

8/29/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Negi for trialA field day focusing on “Preliminary Observations of ‘Negi’ Green Onion Varieties for Long White Stems’ will be held on Friday, September 9, from 10:00 a.m. to noon at the Poamoho Research Station in Waialua. Green onion (Allium fistulosum) is typically grown in Hawaii for its long dark green leaves and used as a garnish for many dishes. In Japan, green onion instead is grown for its long white stems and is called “negi.” The white stems are used as a garnish as well but are also used to make soup bases and can be pickled. The average stem length for this type of onion can range from 12 to 24 inches. This trial looks to evaluate 20 commercially available green onion varieties for their potential commercial production as “negi”-type green onions. This field day will provide growers with on-farm observation of each variety’s growth characteristics and allow them to learn about management practices. For more information, or to request an auxiliary aid or service (e.g., sign language interpreter, designated parking, or material in alternative format), contact Jensen Uyeda at 622-4185 or via email at juyeda@hawaii.edu by September 2.

Horticulturists Unite!

8/29/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Hawaii delegates to ASHS in AtlantaTPSS was well represented at the 113th Annual Conference of the American Society for Horticultural Science in Atlanta, Georgia earlier this month. Faculty presenters Tessie Amore, Kent Kobayashi, Ken Leonhardt (l.), and Susan Miyasaka (3rd r.) made eleven oral and poster presentations, including four invited presentations in two orchid workshops. Grad students Russell Galanti (r.), Kauahi Perez (2nd l.), and Tia Silvasy (2nd r.) also made four oral and poster presentations, while Aleca Borsuk, a NASA Hawaii Space Grant Consortium Fellow working with Kent, presented a poster. Tia presented her Master’s research in a single slide for the Scholars Ignite competition for graduate students. Also attending the conference were Professor Emeritus Richard Criley (3rd l.) and Dr. Nguyen, a visiting Borlaug Scholar from Vietnam working with Jonathan Deenik. Hawai‘i attendees participated in the ASHS Career and Graduate School Fair, answering questions, passing out TPSS and CTAHR flyers, and sharing Hawai‘i goodies provided by various agencies.

The Science of Aloha (Shirts)

8/29/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Aloha shirt
A few years ago, Andy Reilly (FDM) and Marcia Morgado (FDM, retired) published an article on the cultural significance of the aloha shirt, “Funny kine clothes: The Hawaiian shirt as popular culture” in Paideusis, a journal of cross-cultural studies. We recently discovered that an account of their study made it to Popular Science magazine, with the reviewer on the one hand categorizing the article amongst “Improbable Research” but on the other hand mandating that the reader “read every word of [it] ASAP.” Clearly the author’s a convert!

Bringing Back the Butterflies

8/29/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Pulelehua butterflyWill Haines (PEPS) is now managing a new insectary for the DLNR, along with PEPS MS alumna Cynthia King. KHON posted a video describing the agency’s plan to rear the rapidly dwindling native Kamehameha butterfly, or pulelehua, and attempt to reintroduce it into the wild. Once the facility is running, Will and Cynthia will be working with the community and landowners to plant the pulelehua’s preferred plant, mamaki, and then reintroduce the butterfly to restored sites, with the goal of bringing it back to some of the residential areas that were identified as suitable habitat in Will and Dan Rubinoff’s (PEPS) pulelehua mapping project. The initiative is also discussed on Hawaii News Now’s Geek Beat. Will explains that his work on the butterfly also encompasses studying the factors contributing to its decline in the field, including mentoring MS student Colby Maeda in his research on the impact of predators and parasitoids on the eggs and caterpillars.

Geek Beat Loves Landscape MD

8/29/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Geek Beat discussing Landscape MDThe new landscape and garden pest app for iPhone developed by Scot Nelson (TPSS), Arnold Hara (PEPS Emeritus), and Ruth Niino-Duponte (PEPS) is featured in Hawaii News Now’s Geek Beat, where it’s already proven to be very helpful—it allowed Burt Lum to diagnose sooty mold caused by aphids’ honeydew on his gardenias, and explained how to solve the problem. Got a garden problem? Get Landscape MD today—it’s useful, and it’s free!

You Gotta Try a Yukata

8/24/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Yukata workshop posterThe Sharing Kinomo Culture Project (SKCP) will be holding a special kimono event in Miller 112 on Friday August 23 from noon to 1:30 p.m. There will be a presentation about the history and cultural significance of the yukata, or summer kimono, followed by the chance to try on a yukata. There will be 50 different yukata available. Please wear comfortable clothing so you can change easily. SKCP has been holding workshops at schools and universities throughout the world since 2009. This event is jointly sponsored by Shu Hwa Lin and FDM and UHM. It is free and open to all faculty, staff, and students.

Get Your Hands in Some Flowers

8/24/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Haku lei being madeWant to learn how to make gorgeous flower arrangements, container gardens, and other examples of the art of floristry, or floral design? Doesn’t everyone? You have the chance to learn by taking Floricultural Arts: Principles and Techniques, which will acquaint students with the different aspects of floral design, provide hands-on experience in making different floriculture products, and provide opportunities to design and develop new floricultural products. It ends with a semester “challenge” to come up with a floriculture product utilizing native Hawaiian plants. The class will be held on Thursdays from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 to 4:20 p.m. The instructors are Teresita Amore (amore@hawaii.edu) and Orville Baldos (obaldos@hawaii.edu). It’s cross listed as TPSS 491 (CRN 79073) and TPSS 711 (CRN 79074), so take your pick—but pick fast!

Everything’s Coming Up Poinsettias...

8/12/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Emily TengTPSS graduate student Emily Teng is the proud recipient of the John Carew Memorial Scholarship, a scholarship open to graduate students in horticulture with an interest in greenhouse crops. Emily’s research project is aimed at analyzing how anthocyanin qualities in poinsettia bracts respond to changes in temperature, light intensity, and plant growth regulator use. After receiving her doctorate, Emily would like to work in floriculture production and variety improvement research. She hopes to work in a university as an educator, but no matter what position she has, she wants her work to connect scientific research with practical industry applications. Great job, Emily!

Food Security Grows on Trees

8/12/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Diane RagoneDiane Ragone, 2015 Outstanding Alumna and the director of the National Breadfruit Institute on Kaua’i, is lauded in a recent article in the high-end food magazine Saveur, which describes her as “the closest thing the world has to a breadfruit celebrity.” The article explains that in an effort to combat world hunger, Diane has teamed with a horticultural company to send 60,000 breadfruit trees to more than 30 countries and distributed thousands of breadfruit plants throughout Hawai‘i.

Nematodes Rock!...

8/12/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


PEPS nematologists at SON conferenceSo proclaimed the T-shirt grad student Philip Waisen (second from right) wore to the joint conference between the Society of Nematologists (SON) and Organization of Nematologists of Tropical America (ONTA), which was held in Montreal, Canada, from July 18 to 22. Other nematologists from and affiliated with PEPS also attended the event, presenting nine papers or posters related to plant-parasitic nematodes or entomopathogenic nematodes in Hawai‘i. Other graduate students participating were Kevin Chan, Shova Mishra, Josiah Marques, Justin Bisel, and Teri Lau, along with their advisors Zhiqiang Cheng, Roxana Myers, Brent Sipes, and Koon-Hui Wang. Philip was awarded Bayer Student Travel Award from SON and the Mary Olmsted Endowed Fellowship from UH Foundation, while Shova was awarded Graduate Student Travel award from the UH GSO to attend the meeting. PEPS nematologists will also be greeting three graduate students visiting from the University of Florida on Aug 9 for academic information exchange—and more rocking nematodes!

Growing Minds

8/12/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Kalani MatsumuraThe Star-Advertiser carried a great article by junior Extension agent Kalani Matsumura enumerating the many benefits that come to students who work and learn in school gardens. These include a greater awareness of sustainability and the importance of healthy eating, information about botany and biology, inspiration for works of art and literature, and the feeling of energy and focus that comes from being outdoors instead of always stuck in a classroom. The article also quotes CTAHR alumnus Alberto Ricordi, now a landscape architect, who volunteers in a school garden in Waimanalo and says that he loves to see children’s sense of accomplishment and excitement when they help things to grow. Kalani’s focus at CTAHR is on urban horticulture. He will assist the O‘ahu Master Gardener Program and help to expand training and outreach opportunities.

Read It and Eat

8/12/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Cover of Q2 2016 Impact ReportThis quarter’s Impact Report has now been posted on the CTAHR website. In keeping with the start of Rachel Novotny’s tenure as interim dean, this issue looks at food, food systems, and nutrition, her own research interests. Stories discuss ways to solve the problems of food waste, trials for a sustainable new crop in the Islands, making sure that farmers and producers keep the food we eat safe with Good Agricultural Practices, and the Hawai’i Foods website’s uniquely local slant on nutrition information. Gobble up the issue today!

Honor in Horticulture

8/12/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Kent Kobayashi receiving awardKent Kobayashi (TPSS) was honored along with other newly elected Fellows at the Awards Ceremony at the 113th Annual Conference of the American Society for Horticultural Science (ASHS) in Atlanta, Georgia. Kent was selected as a fellow for his research on the use of microcomputers in horticulture, lights and plant growth, and Extension information systems, and for his significant role in ASHS committees. Six previous CTAHR faculty have also been selected as fellows, the highest honor that ASHS can bestow on its members. Congratulations!

In the Warm Heart of Africa

8/12/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Ngolowindo Coop with certificatesCTAHR alumna Linda Burnham Larish, who received her MS in Horticulture from the college in 1990 and who has worked as a researcher with faculty in the college, traveled to Malawi in June as a volunteer of the USAID-supported Farmer-to-Farmer program with Cultivating New Frontiers in Agriculture (CNFA). Linda spent three weeks in Malawi teaching forty-one members of the Ngolowindo Cooperative how to improve their technical knowledge of growing tomatoes. The cooperative works in the Salima area growing crops with furrow irrigation at this time of year, which is the dry season. This was Linda’s sixth assignment with the FtF Program. She has worked as a volunteer with both Winrock and CNFA in Southern Africa and Bangladesh. Her first visit to Malawi as a FtF volunteer was in 2010, when she taught Integrated Pest Management to the Lobi Horticultural Association. During her most recent two-week tenure, Linda focused on tomato cultivation and pest and disease management in tomato. It’s expected that as a result of her work, the quality and production of the Cooperative’s tomato crop will improve. Here Linda is pictured with Ngolowindo Cooperative members, who are holding up their certificates of course completion outside of the Cooperative’s meeting and storage building. Find out more information about the Farmer-to-Farmer program or volunteer opportunities here!

Tropical Connections

8/12/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Rebecca ColeRebecca Cole (NREM), currently a junior researcher working at Komohana in Creighton Litton’s lab, has been selected for a prestigious position with the Organization of Tropical Studies (OTS). Starting in October, she will be the director of the Las Cruces Research Station and Wilson Botanical Garden in Costa Rica, close to where she grew up. Dr. Elizabeth Losos, the president and CEO of OTS, called Rebecca “an outstanding scientist and educator.” Rebecca earned her Ph.D. at UC Santa Cruz, and at CTAHR she has established a long-term project to monitor recovery of threatened ecosystems and test ways to restore native plant communities in Hawai‘i. She also co-founded a non-profit organization, the American Climber Science Program (ACSP), to conduct volunteer research and conservation in remote and mountainous regions throughout the world. Rebecca intends to continue her research on restoration ecology, ecosystem ecology, and global change biology in the tropics, both in Costa Rica and in Hawai‘i; she will retain a 20% appointment with UH and will facilitate research and educational collaborations between UHM and OTS.

Affordable Excellence

8/12/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


CTAHR students outside Hamilton LibraryThanks to UH Manoa, Hawai'i came in at 5th place among all the states in providing affordable access to a public research university education. The affordability report was released by the Institute for Research on Higher Education at the University of Pennsylvania. The community colleges ranked even higher, being found to be the most affordable two-year public institutions of higher education in the US. The upshot: UH? A great deal. Any institution that CTAHR is a part of? Priceless!

This Little Piggy’s Going To Market…

8/12/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Swine producers at pork coop meetingExtension agent Michael DuPonte has been instrumental in helping local swine producers sustainably continue pork production in the Islands. He helped to introduce and educate producers about the Inoculated Deep Litter System, an EPA-approved waste management practice using locally collected micro-organisms, deep litter made of green waste, and a housing design using natural ventilation and solar drying. Recently he moderated a very successful Agricultural Cooperative workshop for swine producers put on by the CES and collaborators. The Kohala Center’s Teresa Young discussed the opportunities and structure of a co-op, and Hanna Bree introduced a low-interest loan program for local producers, while Mike Amado, the president of the Hawaii Island Meat Co-op, highlighted the services that a mobile slaughterhouse could provide for hogs. Sixty producers gathered to discuss bottlenecks in market, feed prices, available equipment, regulations, and harvesting. Results of the discussion identified these group objectives: 1) meet market demands by farmers’ consolidation of animals 2) merge feed orders for volume pricing and shipping discounts, and 3) incorporate use of the mobile slaughter service to meet current and initiate new pork markets. The producers unanimously voted to organize and pursue the formation of the Big Island Swine Cooperative. We can hope all this means more delicious local pork in the markets!

Help for Hepatitis A

8/12/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Hepatitis A virus under microscopeHepatitis A has been in the news lately, and the number of cases in Hawai‘i is rising. That’s why the new publication Hepatitis A by Aurora Saulo (TPSS) is so timely and important to read. It gives useful information about the disease, including the pathways of infection and common-sense ways to avoid getting it—most important, get vaccinated, and practice good personal hygiene, like washing your hands carefully. Check out the rest of the paper here!

Ending Waste

8/11/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


PingSun Leung and Matt LokeShortly after Matt Loke (NREM, HDOA) and PingSun Leung (NREM) published their troubling and timely report on the amount of food wasted in the Hawaiian Islands, Sen. Brian Schatz co-sponsored a bill, the Food Recovery Act, that outlines multiple pathways to be taken to reduce food waste nationally, such as clarifying expiration labels, using less-than-perfect-looking fruits and vegetables, and funding composting initiatives. Sen. Schatz is quoted as promising, “Our bill takes commonsense steps to help end food waste, feed families, and ensure our environment and food supply remain sustainable.” Coincidence? We don’t think so…

The Doctor Is in the Yard

8/11/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Landscape MD screen shotScot Nelson (TPSS), Arnold Hara (PEPS Emeritus), and Ruth Niino-Duponte (PEPS) have created a new app for iPhone that allows users to diagnose common diseases and insect pests affecting Hawai‘i landscape plants. Landscape MD, which includes symptoms, IPM recommendations, pictures, and links to more information, is now available from the App Store. It’s free, easy to use, and useful to have, so download it today!

July



Master Gardeners, Masterful Impact

7/28/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Bill Miller and Marisol Quintanilla-TornelThe East Hawai‘i Master Gardeners have posted a great promotional video that shows the group’s impact in the community and explains how to join, as well as giving guidelines on when and how to use the helpline service they provide. As president Bill Miller (left, with Extension agent Marisol Quintanilla-Tornel) explains, the group is over 100 strong. They educate home gardeners on how to grow food and ornamentals. They have served over 500 gardeners through the helpline, and given out more than 750 food plants. They are planning to expand their ethnobotanical garden, adding additional medicinal and cultural plants, and to create an edible orchard. Check out the video on YouTube and at the East Hawai‘i Master Gardener website! In other exciting EHIMGA news, at the most recent board meeting the group voted unanimously to become an official non-profit entity. This will allow them to apply for grants and to earn more money each year without penalty from the IRS. They are the first Master Gardener group in the state to seek non-profit status. Go, EHIMGA!

Go, Go, GoFarm!

7/28/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


GoFarm class at Windward locationThe beginning-farmer program GoFarm Hawai‘i is flourishing! A branch is opening on the Big Island, in partnership with the Kohala Center, and another branch has been established on Maui. These two new programs join those in Windward O‘ahu, in Leeward O‘ahu on Pioneer Hi-Bred land in Waialua, and on Kaua‘i. The program has received funding from Kamehameha Schools, the Ulupono Initiative, and many other community partners who realize what important work its organizers, teachers, and students are doing in the state.

Avatar of Avos

7/28/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Marisol at Honokaa avocado workshopMarisol Quintanilla-Tornel’s Sustainable Agriculture and Soil Health Extension Program recently came to the rescue of farmers from the Hamakua Agricultural Cooperative. One of them planted 5 acres of avocado, of which more than 80% died due to root rot caused by poor soil drainage, among other problems. In order to prevent other farmers from making similar mistakes, a hands-on workshop was conducted on Sunday, July 17, at which farmers learned best practices for planting fruit trees and were shown how to take soil samples and use nutrient amendments. They were also encouraged to use sunn hemp as a cover crop to improve soil quality, reduce nematode problems, and increase soil health. Finally, multiple questions regarding pest control issues were answered, some of the most prominent being the management of fruit flies and Chinese rose beetles. Avo farming now has a much brighter future on the Hamakua coast!

Incubating an Ag Superstar

7/28/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Steven ChiangSteven Chiang, head of the Ag Incubator and director of the GoFarm Hawai‘i program, has been appointed to the USDA Advisory Committee on Beginning Farmers and Ranchers, which advises the secretary of Agriculture on programs for providing financial assistance to beginning farmers and ranchers, methods of maximizing the number of new farming and ranching opportunities created annually, methods of encouraging state partnerships that enhance opportunities for new and beginning farmers and ranchers, and methods of creating new farming or ranching opportunities. They’ll be lucky to have him! Steven also recently gave presentations in Japan on the Ag Incubator and GoFarm program. Maybe there will be a GoFarm Japan program in the future!

A Future in Fashion

7/28/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Kaycee YoshiokaCongratulations to FDM student Kaycee Yoshioka (pictured), who won the scholarship prize of $1200 in the adult designer category at the Goodwill Goes GLAM! Fashion Show. The award was given by fashion show producer Kini Zamora to the most promising youth and adult designers, in whom he identified the greatest industry potential. The show’s theme this year was “Doll Me Up,” and designers were allowed $200 per look to buy clothing donated to the Goodwill and fashion it into haute-couture doll-inspired designs. All three CTAHR students, including Von Kaanaana and Krystal Ann Cabo, did a fabulous job, as did co-producers of the show and FDM alumnae Julianna Bautista and Christen Chin. Check out the show here!

Having a Ball Learning About Ag!

7/28/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Taiwanese students play bocce ball at MagoonCTAHR organized a one-week long “farming internship” program in June for students from National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan. During this internship, students worked from about 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. daily and visited the Waimanalo and Magoon Research Stations, Lyon Arboretum, Aquaponics Iliili Farms in Nanakuli, and Sumida Farm in Pearl City. Students were fortunate to learn from Jim Brewbaker (TPSS, Emeritus), director of Lyon Arboretum Carl Evensen (NREM), and CTAHR collaborator Cheng-Sheng Lee of the Oceanic Institute about corn, natural resources management, and aquaculture. Teresita Amore and Orville Baldos (both TPSS) and Mary Martini (FCS) added their own expertise to the program, as well. And field specialist Jensen Uyeda gave the students applied experience and knowledge about tropical farming systems, organic farming, and tropical fruits and crops such as taro, corn, sugarcane, papaya, bananas, avocados, cacao, hydroponic lettuce, and green onions. Another highlight of the internship program was learning a new game, “Hawaiian Rules Bocce,” designed and developed by Joseph DeFrank (TPSS)!

Kailua-Kona Coffee

7/28/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Andrea Kawabata giving coffee reportAbout 135 coffee growers, industry professionals, and stakeholders from across the state attended the Hawaii Coffee Association Conference held July 13–15 in Kailua-Kona. On Friday, Andrea Kawabata, assistant Extension agent for coffee and orchard crops, presented the Hawaii’s Coffee Growers Report, an overview of the 2015–2016 season’s production, weather, and pest and disease implications, as well as exciting news from the state’s coffee-growing regions. Many were surprised to learn about a new coffee farm on Lana‘i. Additionally, Andrea provided a report on Georgia- and California-grown coffee and discussed protecting the industry from other devastating pests and diseases such as coffee leaf rust. Her full presentation is on Big Island Video News, with a short article about the event. Also, HC “Skip” Bittenbender (TPSS) presented an overview of coffee research and outreach conducted by CTAHR faculty and staff. Both presentations will be available at the HCA website shortly. During the conference, Jen Burt (TPSS) and Heather Forester of the Hawaii Ant Lab manned an educational booth. They met and talked with farmers and processors about coffee berry borer, invasive species prevention and control, and other CTAHR and HDOA projects.

Roots of STEM

7/28/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Sree Kutty Star-Advertiser articleIncoming Biological Engineering student Sree Kutty is featured in the Star-Advertiser’s “Incidental Lives” column, which describes how this two-time international science fair awardee came to excel in the sciences from an early age. Sree began working with Samir Khanal (MBBE) in his lab when she was in eighth grade, beginning by studying anaerobic digestion (AD) of food wastes. Then she and her partner, Ariana Kim, started looking at invasive macro-algae and other high-value products, fermenting them to produce fertilizer, ethanol, and carbon nanotubes. This project won Sree and Ariana third prize at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair in 2015 and second prize in 2016. Welcome to CTAHR, Sree!

Better Living Through (Natural) Chemistry!

7/28/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Pratibha NerurkarFor the second year in a row, the Multistate Hatch Research Project “Beneficial and Adverse Effects of Natural, Bioactive Dietary Chemicals on Human Health and Food Safety,” of which Pratibha Nerurkar (MBBE) is a team member, was selected this month for the Award of Excellence by the Western Association of Agricultural Experiment Station Directors (WAAESD). Since 1971, this multidisciplinary group of scientists from 15 universities and the USDA has worked to improve our understanding of the relationship between chemicals in our diet and human health, with the goals of improving health and food safety, and developing effective herbal products and food supplements.

Nuts for Chickens

7/28/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


SudhirRajesh Jha’s graduate student Sudhir Yadav (both HNFAS) has won a national award, the Certificate of Excellence for the best project and presentation in the Metabolism and Nutrition section of the Poultry Science Association’s Annual meeting in New Orleans. MS student Suhir’s presentation was on “Nitrogen-corrected apparent metabolizable energy value of macadamia nut cake for broiler chickens.” Macadamia nut cake is a by-product of macadamia production that would otherwise be thrown away, so researching how to turn it instead into a locally producible feed is a sustainable way to grow the local livestock industry—win-win!

Big Sky Country Ag

7/28/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


John Morgan in MontanaAssociate Dean Ken Grace and CTAHR supporter John Morgan, president of Kualoa Ranch, participated in the Western Region Joint Summer Meeting in Bozeman, Montana, this month. This annual conference of the deans and associate deans of the 17 western and Pacific agricultural colleges rotates each year; it was hosted by CTAHR in 2011. John serves as CTAHR’s industry representative on the Committee on Agricultural Research, Extension and Teaching (CARET). This stakeholder group enthusiastically voices support for the nation’s land-grant ag colleges in visits to Congress and other planned activities. Mahalo nui loa to John, who is pictured center foreground wearing a blue shirt and sunglasses in the attached photo.

Summer Learning...

7/28/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Field Day at WaimanaloWaimanalo Research Station hosted a summer field day promoting CTAHR’s research with cover crops and soil health, including fieldwork conducted by grad students Tiare Silvasy and Chandrappa Gangaiah. A presentation by Dan Sullivan of Oregon State University was also featured. Extension agents Jari Sugano and Jensen Uyeda joined with Koon Hui Wang (PEPS) and Ted Radovich (TPSS) to host the multi-agency-supported event. Participants were able to visit the active field trials on station and meet new junior Extension agents Fred Reppun, Marisol Quintanilla-Tornel, and Kalani Matsumura and junior researcher Amjad Ahmad (TPSS). They also got the chance to talk with members from ag organizations such as O‘ahu County CES, Hawaii Farm Bureau, Hawaii Mediation Program, GoFarm Hawai‘i, BEI, Ko‘olau Seed Company, USDA NRCS, HDOA, West Oahu Soil and Water Conservation, and Waimanalo Learning Center.

Cheer for the ’Char!

7/28/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Hue NguyenPI Hue Nguyen, with Amjad Ahmad and Ted Radovich (all TPSS), et al., were just awarded a grant for $259,816 for 2016–2019 from Western SARE for “Improving nitrogen synchronization of local fertilizers, soil fertility and crop quality with biochar application.” Hue explains that while progress is being made in developing recommendations for locally produced fertilizers, the use of biochar has not yet been adequately addressed. Biochar, a type of charcoal produced in the absence of oxygen, can be applied to the soil in order to improve its productivity by reducing nitrogen (N) loss, enhancing N mineralization, and otherwise improving and sustaining long- and short-term soil fertility. They hope to improve the efficiency of fertilizer use, increase the profitability of growers using local inputs, and improve the decision-making of local farmers who use biochar.

Very Distinguished

7/28/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Charly Kinoshita at NACTAMore than 400 people attended the recent conference of the North American Colleges and Teachers of Agriculture (NACTA) on the Manoa campus, hosted by CTAHR and UH. There were 300 oral and poster presentations focused on improving teaching and learning in post-secondary agriculture, food, and natural resources programs (including a number by CTAHR faculty, staff, and students); events at WCC and KCC; tours to Magoon and Waimanalo Research Stations, Lyon Arboretum, Kahuku and MA‘O Farms, Mari’s Garden, and He‘eia Fish Pond; and a workshop on teaching indigenous agriculture by CTAHR grad student Tia Silvasy. Other CTAHRites represented included Mary Martini (FCS), Orville Baldos and Ted Radovich (both TPSS), distance ed specialist Kellie Taguchi and Mandy Chen, much-honored student employee with ASAO. Best of all, Associate Dean Charles Kinoshita was awarded the NACTA Distinguished Educator Award for his meritorious service to higher education and NACTA through his illustrious years as educator, researcher, and mentor! Here he is at the closing banquet at which he was honored with, from left, NACTA’s incoming president Tracy Dougher, Western Regional Director Ingelia White, and outgoing president Tracy Hoover. Check out more photos on Flickr.

Status Report

7/28/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


EHIMGA board meetingThe East Hawai‘i Master Gardeners Association is moving up in the world! At the latest board meeting, this intrepid group of volunteers (pictured here with agent Marisol Quintanilla-Tornel) voted unanimously to become an official non-profit entity. This will allow the organization to apply for grants and to earn more money each year without penalty from the IRS. They are the first Master Gardener group in the state to seek non-profit status. The group is flourishing, with impressive community service to their credit, such as recently planting 800 vincas to beautify downtown Hilo. Go, EHIMGA!

CTAHR and the CSA

7/28/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Fred Lau at MariO‘ahu Fresh, a service delivering CSA (Community-Supported Agriculture) shares of local fruits and vegetables sourced from local farms, has multiple college connections. Rose Matthews, a 2013 TPSS alumna, now works for the organization, and other alumni are among the farmers, such as Mari’s Gardens’ Fred Lau (pictured). Best of all, Oahu Fresh has a pickup location in Sherman Lab Room 101 on Thursdays, where CSA members can pick up their weekly bounty, including mangoes, cucumbers, butternut squash, kale, and much more. They’re hoping to expand to a second pickup location on campus soon, as well. Check them out!

Showers Bring Flowers

7/28/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Richard Criley (TPSS Emeritus) recently posted a celebration of the gorgeous campus shower trees in the blog The Campus Landscape: “A riot of color greets entrants to the UHM campus when entering via Maile Way. The trees lining the road and median strip are Rainbow Showers, a seedless hybrid of two species of Cassia. Created nearly a century ago in Honolulu, at least three named varieties can be found on campus, with the pink and yellow ‘Wilhelmina Tenney’ the most prominent and colorful. In the East West Road median the white and yellow shower tree is ‘Queen’s Hospital White,’ and at the Maile Way crossing to Hamilton Library is a ‘Lunalilo Yellow’. ‘Wilhelmina Tenney’ was adopted as the official tree of the City and County of Honolulu in 1965. Over the course of its blooming season, flowers go from deep watermelon pink to a light yellow. Peak flowering season is June to August. ‘Queen’s Hospital White’ is named for the site where the original plant was established. At one time, it was also known as ‘Lemon Meringue’ for its white and yellow blossoms. ‘Lunalilo Yellow’ was named for the street along which it was originally planted.” What a great reminder to look up and enjoy the floral bounty above us!

The Road to Mandalay

7/28/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Halina Zaleski and Rajesh Jha in MandalayDuring the first half of June, Rajesh Jha and Halina Zaleski (both HNFAS) served as expert volunteers in Myanmar for the USAID Farmer-to-Farmer Program through Winrock International. Working with the Myanmar Livestock Federation, they conducted swine producer training in Mandalay and Yangon for over 120 participants, including swine producers and veterinarians. Myanmar has opened up to the world since Halina’s last visit in 2013, and both she and Rajesh were impressed with the farmers’ eagerness to adopt new approaches and techniques to improve swine production. Discussion with swine industry stakeholders and local government officials focused on policies to support the development of the swine sector. At the University of Veterinary Science, Yezin, the two taught a senior class and met with the pro-rector, department heads, and faculty to explore potential collaboration. Here they are pictured with Kyaw Htin of the Myanmar Livestock Federation in Mandalay.

Yes, CES!

7/28/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Chickpea field trialDuring the past 6 months, Oahu CES has been productive! They have conducted two field days focused on sustainable agriculture practices, at Poamoho and Waimanalo research stations; offered a dozen workshops on topics such as IPM and pesticide and food safety; secured additional grant funding to support Oahu CES endeavors; and sponsored a mini conference at Turtle Bay Resort, in collaboration with many of Hawai‘i’s agriculture-related organizations. For those who missed these various offerings, some have been put on the Internet, like the FSMA & Good Ag Practices (GAP) Workshops and the Pest Exclusion Pilot Study. Also check out the latest edition of Hanai‘Ai, with its new editor Sarah Moore, to access the formal presentations (to receive it, email suganoj@ctahr.hawaii.edu or theodore@hawaii.edu). Offering even more help to the island’s growers and producers are the three new agents now serving O‘ahu County: Jensen Uyeda, a tenure-track assistant Extension agent for edible crops; Fred Reppun, a Junior agent for food safety; and Kalani Matsumura, a junior agent for urban horticulture and the Master Gardener program. Welcome!

Samoa Food Sufficiency in Samoa

7/28/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Jensen Uyeda in SamoaExtension agent Jensen Uyeda recently went to Samoa to conduct a training program for Ag Professionals and was featured in their local news. He led a series of workshops at the Agriculture, Community and Natural Resources (ACNR) division of the American Samoa Community College (ASCC). Topics in the WSARE-funded program included irrigation management; hydroponic farming systems; integrated pest management; good agricultural practices; the Food Safety Modernization Act; and crop selection for conducting variety trials. Participants were agricultural professionals, nonprofit organizations involved in agriculture, and farmers. As Jensen pointed out, “Samoa is in the same boat as Hawai‘i in that we are both isolated and have very limited natural resources, which makes food production very challenging to do locally,” but he sees a lot of potential for Samoa to increase the quantity and quality of its food production. In particular, he suggested that growers look into producing citrus, especially limes. Jensen hopes to return to Samoa for future educational programs, and those he helped there are looking forward to seeing him again!

HHHHappy to be in 4-H

7/28/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Lamb at farm fairA laudatory article in the Star-Advertiser recently commended the 4-H livestock program for teaching its young participants patience, responsibility, and other important qualities while they care for and bond with animals ranging from chickens and rabbits to steers. There’s been an increase in projects with the smaller animals in recent years, the article notes, since they are cheaper to purchase and can be kept in smaller areas, even in urban Honolulu. The article also praises the many other programs that 4-H offers in Hawai‘i, including STEM learning, healthy living initiatives, and junior Master Gardeners. It’s no wonder some of the 4-H participants are the third generation in their families to be involved!

Kids Count on Ivette

7/28/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Image from cover of 2016 KIds Count DatabookIvette Rodriguez Stern, project manager for the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Kids Count initiative, was interviewed in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser about the recent Hawai‘i Kids Count report put out by COF and about how her own family life and upbringing influenced her interest in social issues, particularly surrounding children and families. In the interview, Ivette identifies investment in early childhood education and intervention as among the most important ways to help kids to thrive, and she points out that an initiative backed by the Center to help families pay for preschool costs was recently passed during the last legislative session. She explains that Hawai‘i has potential to be among the states with the highest levels of child well-being, as it has been in the past; it’s just a matter of educating people and making sure it’s a priority.

Glam Jam

7/21/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Christen Chin and Julianne BautistaIn its article on the Goodwill Goes GLAM! Fashion Show, the Star-Advertiser notes that two FDM alumnae, Christen Chin and Julianna Buatista (pictured), are co-producers of the show. Current FDM students Von Kaanaana, the director of the last UH Fashion Show; Krystal Ann Cabo; and Kaycee Yoshioka are among the designers for the show as well. They create one-of-a-kind high-fashion garments by repurposing, refashioning, and combining gently used clothing donated to the Goodwill. Check out their creations at the Fashion Show!

Animals for Human Health

7/13/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Vet holding lamb with stethoscopeThe National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced an interagency funding initiative calling forgrant applications pertaining to using agriculturally important domestic animal species to improve human health through the advancement of basic and translational research deemed highly relevant to both agricultural and biomedical research. The initiative aims to facilitate and encourage comparative medicine research studies by selecting and refining farm animal models that mimic human developmental, physiological, and etiological processes in order to better understand the biology of fertility and infertility, normal and abnormal metabolism, and developmental origin of diseases, and to improve prevention and treatment of infectious diseases in both human and agriculturally important domestic animals.

June



Cloud Watchers

6/23/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Images of cloud cover over Maui CountySee those puffy white things overhead? They’ve got serious research tracking them. MS grad Mallory Barnes and her advisor Tomoaki Miura (both NREM) recently co-authored a paper on clouds in the Islands with Thomas Giambelluca of the UH Geography Department, based largely on Mallory’s thesis work. “An assessment of diurnal and seasonal cloud cover changes over the Hawaiian Islands using Terra and Aqua MODIS,” published in the prestigious Journal of Climate, shows an analysis of more than 10 years’ worth of satellite data and develops an understanding of the chance of cloud cover occurrence over the Hawaiian Islands. This study produced the first high-spatial-resolution cloud-cover dataset in Hawai‘i!

On Fire

6/23/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Wildfire on WaahilaDid you know that when it comes to wildfires, what you do to help prevent them before and after they happen might just be as important as what you do while they’re occurring? Two publications by Clay Trauernicht (NREM) and his co-authors, “Pre-Fire Planning Guide for Resource Managers and Landowners in Hawai‘i and Pacific Islands” and “Post-Fire Vegetation and Soil Monitoring in Hawai‘i” explain this essential point. Forethought is essential—making a map of the property will point out any high-value areas that need special protection and will show you whether firefighters will have the access they need to put out the flames. It’s important to figure out what possible problems exist and how to solve them before fire shows up; hopefully this preparation will keep it from showing up at all. It’s just as necessary to monitor the growth that returns after a fire to make sure it’s not going to be fuel for the next. Take a look at these very timely publications while nothing’s on fire!

Food Now

6/23/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Kiwano melonWant to know about the place of food at this point in time? Check out these bulletins! Merchandisers must take the new generation of Millennials into account, Aurora Saulo (TPSS) explains in “Millennials and Food.” She gives insights culled from recent research into what they’re eating, when, and why. She shows that Millennials like to eat smaller meals throughout the day, similar to snacks, and favor bowls over plates. They form opinions about what to eat based on social media; they’re interested in diverse taste experiences and enjoy ethnic foods, including exotic fruits. Offering another perspective on food and food value at this particular time is the latest from Matthew Loke (NREM, HDOA) and PingSun Leung (NREM) on the “Value of Hawai‘i Agriculture 2013.” Continuing their important work on the value of ag in the state, the bulletin shows that ag’s overall value has risen since 1997, though its share of contribution to Hawai‘i’s economy has fallen. The good news is that ag’s contribution to employment has stayed steady over the same time period, through the closure of three plantation operations, so diversified ag is up. Now how about planting more exotic fruits?

Malama Keiki

6/23/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Image from cover of 2016 KIds Count DatabookCOF has released the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s 2016 KIDS COUNT© Data Book, which looks at child well-being and how it’s affected by the economy, parents’ education, health, and other life circumstances. This year’s report shows that Hawai‘i ranks 23rd in the nation in overall child well-being, a slight improvement from last year. Ivette Rodriguez Stern (COF) explains, “The most troubling news from this year’s report is that Hawai‘i continues to see increases in the share of children growing up in poverty and harsh economic conditions.” Research shows that growing up in financial hardship can profoundly effect children’s cognitive, social, emotional, and physical development. However, as Ivette explains, “One bright note is that, despite economic challenges, Hawai‘i teens are making progress”: the teen birth rate has decreased, and the proportion of high school students graduating on time has increased slightly. Barbara DeBaryshe (COF) points out that one of the most important things to be done to continue to help children is to expand access to high-quality preschool and early childhood services. Another recommendation in the report is increased paid family leave, which can help family economic security in the face of a health crisis or major family event.

Sprouting the Seeds of Green

6/23/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Kupu fair 2016NREM faculty and students Travis Idol, Kimberly Carlson, Yin-Phan Tsang, Paul Riley, Kelly-Rose Lariosa, and Clara Moreira helped out at the 7th Annual Environmental Fair hosted by Kupu, a nonprofit organization that aims to bring life back to the people, land, and ocean while restoring the larger community for a better tomorrow by training the next generation in green job skill sets such as natural resource management, renewable energy, and energy conservation. The celebration at the Kewalo Basin Training Facility drew more than a hundred program members, alumni, and vendors and included a luncheon with music, entertainment, and speeches by Kupu staff, interns, alumni, and program leaders. The fair provided educational activities, exhibits, and the opportunity for the next generation of environmental leaders in Hawai‘i to explore college programs, internships, and careers in conservation and sustainability throughout the state, and the CTAHRites was there to talk with youth who might be interested in joining NREM. They also provided help with Kupu’s Team Training at Camp Palehua. “Mahalo nui,” wrote Kupu representative Samuel Apuna. “Your efforts dramatically impacted the lives of the youth entering into the HYCC Summer Program, and your service has planted seeds that will bear fruit for years to come.”

Getting Nutty on the Big Island

6/23/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


CTAHR and Island Princess for mac grafting classAlyssa Cho and Andrea Kawabata, along with the Hawaii Macadamia Nut Association (HMNA) and the Island Princess (IP) macadamia company, recently held a hands-on macadamia-grafting workshop at IP’s Farm. Participants toured the farm and nursery and discussed how to select scion wood and establish rootstock. Afterwards, professional grafters instructed and guided participants through active grafting techniques. CTAHR faculty—Alyssa, Andrea, Sharon Motomura-Wages, Kiersten Akahoshi, Marisol Quintanilla-Tornell, Russell Galanti, and Jen Burt—answered grafting and mac nut questions and assisted participants in the hands-on portion of the class. The following day, HMNA had their Annual Membership Meeting in Hilo. It was an information-filled day for farmers and processors in the mac nut industry, including presentations, informational booths, and field and processing equipment demonstrations. CTAHR people assisting with this event were Alyssa, Andrea, Sharon, Russell, and Jen. Rosemary Gutierrez and Alyssa presented an update on Macadamia Felted Coccid (MFC) research, including how farmers can help reduce the spread of MFC and identify MFC damage. Alyssa, Andrea, Sharon, and Jen facilitated a strategic planning session for HMNA members to prioritize the association’s future goals and focus. CTAHR had an educational booth to talk to farmers and processors about online macadamia resources, MFC, and FSMA.

The Summer of the Gene-iuses

6/23/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Summer Gene-iuses classWhile summer vacation is in full swing for most students across the state, Ania Wieczorek (TPSS) is offering fun and interesting classes for some of Hawai‘i’s keiki. The GENE-ius Day program has developed a summer curriculum, teaching many exciting scientific concepts and techniques. Seventy-five students from three local Title I schools, Waipahu Intermediate, Dole Middle, and Kalakaua Middle, are coming to the UH campus for a week-long course that explores the importance of DNA evidence in solving crimes. Not only will these students be acquiring new knowledge, they’ll also be getting a firsthand experience of what it’s like to study at a university!

Fertile Research

6/23/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Local fertilizers study in Western SARE Simply SustainableReplacing imported fertilizers with local resources was the highest priority identified by the participants of the Western SARE Hawai’i Subregional conference in 2008, and this is what Ted Radovich and his team have been looking into with their project “Reducing Pacific Island Growers’ Reliance on Off-island Fertilizer Sources,” explains an article in Western SARE’s newsletter, Simply Sustainable (download it here). They conducted lab and greenhouse experiments to screen locally produced composts and fertilizers for N release and plant growth response. They tested commercial green-waste composts, rendered animal products (tankage), and invasive algae. Thanks to the project, the article explains, there are fewer concerns about invasive algae in the Islands, growers are able to use the algae to fertilize their sweetpotato and taro, there is increased demand for local tankage and less demand for imported fertilizers, and growers make increased use of locally made composts, all positive outcomes!

CTAHR in Pictures

6/23/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Will Haines with Kamehameha butterflyCTAHR’s well represented in the latest UH Magazine, with a CTAHR ad celebrating six students and recent alumni, including Fashion Show director Von Kaanaana (FDM), medical resident Nobuhisa Morimoto (HNFAS), and Student Employee of the Year Mandy Chen (ANSC). Just to up the college’s presence, Will Haines (PEPS, pictured) appears in the UH Foundation ad on the adjacent page, being lauded for protecting Hawai‘i’s native species through his work on the pulelehua, or Kamehameha butterfly. All these pictures just go to show that members of the CTAHR ‘ohana are dedicated, skilled, effective…and even photogenic!

Giving on the Garden Isle

6/23/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Kauai MGs nominated for Outstanding Older Americans awardKaua‘i Master Gardeners give back to their community. They give their time, their energy, their expertise…and sometimes they throw in a packet of pepper seeds, as well. At Kaua‘i CC’s 21st Annual Garden Fair, they gave all these things in preparation for a fruit and vegetable competition they’ll be holding in August. The latest class of Master Gardeners has just graduated, having learned important information about soil fertility, plant pathology, food safety, landscape design, and more—all of which they’ll share with other Kaua‘i gardeners. Not only that, but in recognition of their service above and beyond the call, three certified KMGs were nominated for Kaua‘i’s Outstanding Older Americans award, which recognizes one man and one woman, 65 years or older, who have given their time to better their local communities. Congratulations—and thanks!—to Keith Holdeman (top left), Tom Timmons (top right), and Patricia Fallbeck (bottom right) for their hard work and generosity!

EHIMGA’s Thriving

6/23/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


EHIMGA graduating class of Master Gardeners, 2016The East Hawai‘i Master Gardeners Association has lots of good news to report, including a new junior Extension agent, a very successful plant sale, and the largest graduating class of new Master Gardeners in the chapter’s history! Marisol Quintanilla-Tornel is now offering her help, expertise, and great ideas to the group, pointing out cases of banana bunchy top and planning for a pig-proof fence to protect plantings in their ethnobotanical garden. She’ll be speaking on nematodes, her specialty, at their annual meeting on June 30. At the plant sale—for which Master Gardeners prepare up to eleven months of the year—3000 plants were sold to some 500 very satisfied buyers, and members are already thinking about next year’s sale! The biggest triumph of all may be the new crop of East Hawai‘i Master Gardeners, who went through much of their training without an Extension agent available to help them but who succeeded brilliantly with the help of other Master Gardeners and CTAHR faculty and staff, graduating 32 new enthusiastic and knowledgeable volunteers!

Peas on Earth

6/23/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Chickpea plantChickpeas, that is! Amjad Ahmad (TPSS) just put on two successful field days showcasing the results of his chickpea variety trials, the first at Poamoho Research Station and the second at the Kula Ag Park on Maui. The project, funded by the Hawaii Dept. of Agriculture, aims to increase crop diversity and sustainability in Hawai‘i by encouraging producers to grow a tasty and healthy crop that’s often been overlooked in Island agriculture. The project is also in line with the UN’s declaration that 2016 is the year of pulses (legumes), since these crops grow on limited inputs of water and fertilizers. With the earth facing increased water scarcity, crops that can grow under such conditions and also add important protein, carbohydrates, and fibers to people’s diets are at a premium. Peas, man!

Sweet!

6/23/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Sharon Motomura giving presentationSharon Motomura (pictured), newly hired Extension agent for edible crops in East Hawai‘i, recently organized a successful evening workshop for commercial sweetpotato growers at the Komohana Agriculture & Extension Center. In addition to planning the event, she presented a talk on “On-Farm Plant Nurseries for Sweetpotatoes,” in which she encouraged growers to select their highest-quality storage roots to multiply cuttings for future plantings. Other CTAHR speakers featured at this workshop included Marisol Quintanilla-Tornel, the newly hired junior Extension agent for organic and sustainable agriculture in East Hawai‘i, who spoke about nematode control, and Ishakh Pulakkatu-Thodi, junior researcher in entomology, who presented recent research on pesticides tested to control rough sweetpotato weevil (check out the recent publication on this pest here). Commercial growers of sweetpotatoes who were not able to attend but are interested in getting PDFs of the talks can contact Sharon at smotomur@hawaii.edu.

After Sugar’s Gone

6/23/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Harold KeyserHarold Keyser, former Maui County administrator, has an op-ed in the Star-Advertiser arguing that there’s cause for hope that the closure of HC & S on Maui can lead to important growth in diversified agriculture on the island. He explains that certain possibilities are already under investigation, including test plots for industrial hemp, experiments in growing feedstocks for biofuels, and the expansion of the grass-fed beef industry with the use of these lands for pasture. He also cautions that a limiting factor is the amount of water that will be available for irrigation, pointing out that the available water must be equitably distributed amongst all those who have need of it. If all these issues can be addressed, he concludes, there is cause for optimism that the end of sugar on Maui may be the beginning of a bright new future for diversified ag.

I Screen, You Screen, We All Screen…

6/23/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Making a screenhouse at Waimanalo StationScreenhouses, that is: PEPS students recently joined student interns from the Brazil Scientific Mobility Program (BSMP) for a morning at the Waimanalo Experiment Station with Koon Hui Wang (PEPS) and Extension agents Jari Sugano and Steve Fukuda to construct a DIY screenhouse for the GoFarm Hawai‘i new farmer training program coached by Jay Bost. Through funding from Western SARE and CTAHR Supplemental Fund, the team has constructed several screenhouses to help collaborative farmers to cope with challenging insect pests. Check out these videos filmed by new CTAHR assistant Extension agent Jensen Uyeda, available here and here!

Woman of the Year, Potentially

6/22/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Alex Porlier LangloisANSC major Alex Porlier Langlois is one of two UH Rainbow Wahine nominated for the 2016 NCAA Woman of the Year Award. Alex finished second in both the shot put and discus throw at the Big West Track Championship last month. The NCAA Woman of the Year award honors graduating female college athletes who have distinguished themselves throughout their collegiate careers in academics, athletics, service, and leadership. Now she’ll be assessed for her fitness as a conference nominee, from among whom the Woman of the Year selection committee, made up of representatives from the NCAA membership, will choose the top 30 honorees. They will be celebrated at the annual award ceremony in October in Indianapolis, where the 2016 NCAA Woman of the Year winner will be announced. Congratulations and good luck, Alex!

Extend a Helping Hand Overseas

6/22/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


world mapNow there’s another opportunity to host a Borlaug Fellow. USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service is seeking U.S. universities to host English-speaking agricultural scientists from low- and middle-income countries under the Norman E. Borlaug International Agricultural Science and Technology Fellowship Program. These Fellows have been selected in collaboration with CG Centers based on research topics, academic and professional accomplishments, commitment to Borlaug Fellowship Program goals, and leadership qualities. USDA recommends that the program begin during Fall 2016; however, priority should be given to a time that is appropriate for the Fellow’s proposed research topic. The duration is flexible but cannot exceed 16 weeks. The Fellows’ research topics range from the quantitative analysis of gender in relation to agriculture data through how sweet potato root physiology affects root storage duration and sprouting to improving water management to increase productivity and adaptation to water supply shortage conditions to enhance food security in dry areas. Look into hosting a Fellow today! The application deadline is July 21, and the email address is BorlaugFellowships@fas.usda.gov

Food Safety Gets Qualified

6/15/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


2016 FSMA classAurora Saulo (TPSS) conducted two Hazard Analysis and Risk-Based Preventive Controls for Human Food courses to help the food industry comply with the training requirements of the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA). Those who successfully completed the courses met the FSMA training requirements for “Preventive Controls Qualified Individuals” who may develop and implement food safety plans. At the end of the Preventive Controls course, she also conducted The Principles of Food Hygiene and Food Safety, which is mandatory for all food handlers in facilities that are required to register with the FDA. Those who completed all requirements of the latter course satisfied the FSMA training requirements for “Qualified Individuals.”

What Makes the Flowers

6/3/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Cheyenne BarelaCongratulations to MBBE senior Cheyenne Barela (left), who won second place among 58 competitors in the Natural Sciences category at UH’s Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program. The program showcases the research of students who were awarded competitive fellowships (~$4500) and conducted research in their mentor’s labs. Cheyenne’s research topic and presentation were on “Characterization of the Expression of Protein Disulfide Isomerase-M Subfamily Members, PDI9 and PDI10, during Development of Arabidopsis Plants.” The work indicates the involvement of the Protein Disulfide Isomerase in the development of the anther and pollen of flowers. Cheyenne, who just graduated this May, has been mentored by David Christopher (MBBE) along with his laboratory colleagues, Kristie Matsumoto and Christen Yuen. She also won the Gamma Sigma Delta Undergraduate Oral Presentation award at the SRS!

How and Where to Fertilize

6/3/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Map of N2O emissions worldwideFertilizers greatly increase crop yields, helping to solve problems of hunger. But they also contribute to greenhouse gas emissions, leading to ecological consequences. Striking a balance between these considerations is easier now, thanks to the study conducted Kimberly Carlson (NREM) and her co-authors, published in Global Change Biology, entitled “Spatially explicit estimates of N2O emissions from croplands suggest climate mitigation opportunities from improved fertilizer management.” This paper offers the first sub-national, crop-specific global maps of N2O emissions associated with synthetic and manure N fertilizer application to crops. It shows places where significant increases in fertilizer will have relatively slight impacts on N2O emissions, and other places where relatively small decreases in application can decrease emissions significantly.

New Vet for the Islands

6/3/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Ashley Stokes with Ednee Yoshioka
Congratulations to Dr. Ednee Yoshioka, who just earned her DVM from Colorado State University! Ednee earned her BS in ANSC in May 2012. She will be coming back to O‘ahu to practice veterinary medicine. She’s pictured here with Dr. Ashley Stokes, who’s now Assistant Dean for Veterinary Admissions and Student Services at Col State.

In Bloom

6/3/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Erythrina abyssinica blossomHere is the first bloom from the commemorative non-endemic wiliwili tree (Erythrina abyssinica) planted and dedicated in 2012 to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the USDA and as a symbol of the connection and collaborations between USDA and CTAHR. This tree was deemed particularly significant because it’s related to the culturally and ecologically important wiliwili, another species of Erythrina, which was given hope for survival after being decimated by the Erythrina gall wasp when researchers from CTAHR and USDA, partnering with the Hawai‘i Department of Agriculture, identified a parasite that feeds on the wasp. Another CTAHR connection: Richard Criley (TPSS, Emeritus) grew the tree himself.

All Fashion, All the Time!

6/3/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


models on runwayIf you didn’t get a chance to see Roots, FDM’s 50th anniversary Fashion Show, or if you just want to relive the glitter and glamour, take a look at FDM’s Facebook page, as well as the page dedicated just to the Fashion Show! You’ll be able to catch up on a lot more that’s going on in the department as well as watching exciting Star-Advertiser videos of each designer’s collection. Need more couture? The Historic Costume Collection has its own Facebook page as well!

Grand Masters of Aquaponics

6/3/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Clyde Tamaru and Harry AkoClyde Tamaru and Harry Ako (both MBBE, Emeritus) were recently honored at a testimonial dinner by the Hawaii Aquaculture and Aquaponic Association and the Center for Tropical and Subtropical Aquaculture at Kapi‘olani Community College. Clyde and Harry have been involved in aquaculture and aquaponic research, teaching, and Extension for many years and have been extremely influential in the growth of aquaculture and aquaponics in Hawai‘i. They were rightfully celebrated for their expertise, dedication to public service, and support of these illustrious organizations.

Fishing With a (Social) Net

6/3/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Graphic from study of fishersMichele Barnes and PingSun Leung (NREM) are co-authors of a paper published in the prestigious Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS) on social dynamics as drivers of outcomes in environmental systems, an understanding that is critical to advancing global sustainability. The paper, “Social networks and environmental outcomes,” links comprehensive data on Hawai‘i longline fishers’ information-sharing networks and observed fishing behaviors to demonstrate that social networks are tied to actions that can directly impact ecological health, showing evidence that the propensity for individuals to share information primarily with others most similar to themselves creates segregated networks that impede the diffusion of sustainable behaviors. Their results suggest that having a better understanding of social structures and bolstering effective communication across segregated networks has the potential to contribute toward more sustainable environmental outcomes.

Diving for Environmental Funding

6/3/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Reef in GuamOne of Kirsten Oleson’s (NREM) former MS students, Shanna Grafeld, has published her thesis research in a top journal in the field, Ecological Economics. Co-authors include Kirsten, as well as Michele Barnes, Marcus Peng, and Catherine Chan, all also in NREM. The study, “Divers’ willingness to pay for improved coral reef conditions in Guam: An untapped source of funding for management and conservation?” shows that since the diving industry relies on healthy reefs and can be positively and/or negatively impacted by ecological change, SCUBA divers strongly prefer ecosystems with greater ecological health. They especially value being able to view sharks and turtles. Divers in Guam, the paper explains, were found to be willing to contribute money to experience good environmental quality in dive sites, including funding for upland restoration. Results suggest that divers are an untapped source of funds for conservation—few policies are in place worldwide collecting fees from divers for coral reef management, and none in Guam. The results suggest that understanding divers’ preferences and the drivers behind them may assist managers in designing policies that enlist divers as partners in conservation.

Game of Drones

6/3/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Roberto RodriguezWhat’s that flying overhead? Maybe it has the CTAHR spirit mark! At the UH/Hawaii Community Unmanned Aerial Systems Meeting, a recent daylong workshop on drones on the UHM campus, Roberto Rodriguez III (MBBE grad student) presented a talk on the “Application of Unmanned Aerial Systems in CTAHR.” The co-authors were James Leary (NREM) and Daniel Jenkins (MBBE), while Associate Dean Ken Grace also presented a talk "CTAHR Guidelines for Small Unmanned Aerial Systems (sUAS).

Protecting the Fields

6/3/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


CTAHR presenters at mini-conferenceSome 120 participants attended the edible crop mini-conference recently held at the Turtle Bay Resort. Pests were highlighted as the main priority issue based on O‘ahu’s needs assessment survey in 2015, and this conference provided growers with updates on some of the latest research-based work being conducted on a number of priority crop issues. Presenters and presentations included “Healthy soils and locally produced fertilizer inputs” by Amjad Ahmad and “Crop protection chemical resistance management program” by Jensen Uyeda (both TPSS), and “Overview of common pest groups and variety trial summaries” by Jari Sugano, “Organic and sustainable pest management options” by Koon-Hui Wang, “Reflective mulch for vegetables” by Leyla Kaufman, “Basil diseases—Field trial summary” by Janice Uchida and Mike Kawate, and “New pest on vegetables: Bagrada bug update,” by Ronald Mau and Robin Shimabuku (all PEPS). There was a great turnout for this educational and helpful gathering!

Help for the Homeless

6/3/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


COF Homeless Services Report 2015COF partnered with the Homeless Programs Office of the Hawai‘i State Department of Human Services to release the Homeless Service Utilization Report: Hawai‘i 2015. Authored by Sarah Yuan, Hong Vo, Kristen Gleason, and Javzandulam Azuma, the report provides the most current data on the utilization patterns of homeless services in the state during the 2015 fiscal year, based on agency-entered data in the Homeless Management and Information System (HMIS). The 2015 report discusses overall patterns of inflow, outflow, and return flow to the homeless service system and highlights factors associated with changes since last year. This is important information for legislators, policy-makers, and those who work with this vulnerable population. For instance, the report explains that the 2015 fiscal year reported the highest number of people who sought homeless services in the state’s history: 14,954 in total—an increase of 4.7% from last year!

Save the Forests

6/3/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Kimberly CarlsonCongratulations to Kimberly Carson (NREM), recipient of one of only nine 2015 Google Earth Engine Research Awards!. These one-year awards are structured as unrestricted gifts to universities to support the work of world-class permanent faculty members at top universities around the world. Kimberly’s timely and internationally focused proposal involved “Mapping High Carbon Stock (HCS) forests in Sumatra and Borneo to evaluate and support zero-deforestation supply chain commitments.” The zero-deforestation zone effort aims to create awareness of and protection for areas for which deforestation will have particularly dangerous consequences in terms of ecological impact.

Just a Sample of CTAHR’s Help

6/3/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Kiersten AkahoshiThe Kona Cooperative Extension Service Office offered a hands-on workshop, “Smart Sampling, Sweeter Results,” on Tuesday, May 24. Brian Bushe discussed proper sampling techniques and submission to ADSC and also reviewed and diagnosed samples brought in by participants. Afterwards, participants visited five different stations around the Kona Research Station where a CTAHR faculty member discussed how to properly collect soil and leaf samples for avocado, mac nut, citrus, and coffee. Other CTAHRites involved in the successful even included Sharon Motomura, Andrea Kawabata, Marisol Quintanilla-Tornel, Alyssa Cho, Kiersten Akahoshi, and Jen Burt. Here Kiersten discusses proper soil sampling in the field.

Life After the Borer

6/3/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Andrea Kawabata discussing fire ants and CBBAndrea Kawabata and Jen Burt had plenty of visitors to their booth at the Ka‘u Coffee Festival’s Hoolaulea held at the Pahala Community Center—the Festival saw its largest turnout this year! Andrea (pictured) and Jen joined with Heather Forester of the Hawaii Ant Lab and Rob Curtiss of HDOA to share information about the prevention and control of the coffee berry borer, little fire ant, and other invasive insects. The following day, Andrea and Arturo Ballar of Greenwell Farms spoke to a packed room at the Coffee College, presenting “Six Years of Farming with CBB: Reflecting and Moving Forward,” in which they reviewed the lessons learned in the six years since CBB was discovered in Hawai‘i and discussed how farmers can implement best management practices to increase efficiency on their farms.

Gettin’ Administrated

6/3/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Russell Messing and Ted FeitshansDean Gallo has recommended Russ Messing for the position of Kaua‘i County Administrator and Ted Feitshans for Hawai‘i County Administrator. When approved, Russ will begin his appointment on June 16 and Ted on September 1. As Dean Gallo says, “These are critical positions that we are pleased to have filled with such worthy professionals. Congratulations to both of them!”

May



Hot Shot

5/18/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Alex Porlier LangloisANSC major and UH track star Alex Porlier Langlois finished second in the shot put in the Big West track championships last week. Alex, who just graduated this semester, will be returning to her home in Quebec, Canada, and deciding whether to apply to graduate school or to continue her training in hopes of making the national team in Canada. Alex isn’t just known for her athletic prowess—she’s been on the Dean’s list every semester but one that she’s been a student here and also presented at the recent CTAHR/COE Student Research Symposium.

Horticulturists in the Making

5/13/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


2016 ASHS student winnersTropical Plant and Soil Sciences undergraduates Micah Grumblis (top left), James Green (top right), Amber Au (bottom left), and Marc Ouye (bottom right) were recently honored with the American Society for Horticultural Science’s Collegiate Scholars Award. This award celebrates the academic achievements of junior and senior undergraduates who are majoring in horticulture and are in the top 15% of their class based on academic standing. These four TPSS undergrads were selected based on their scholarship achievements, leadership abilities, participation in campus or club activities, and services to their department. Congratulations to them all!

In Position

5/13/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Helen SpaffordHelen Spafford (PEPS) chaired the five-person writing committee for the Entomological Society of America’s position statement on invasive species, titled “The Not-So-Hidden Dangers of Invasive Species.” The statement discusses the threat of invasive species and the potential risks they pose to U.S. national interests by undermining food security, trade agreements, forest health, ecosystem services, environmental quality, and public health and recreation. Position statements are a well-respected and versatile tool for a scientific society to publicly establish its view on issues of public policy concern. ESA position statements serve as an official way for the society to offer scientific input on many timely policy discussions. The Invasive Species position statement, along with other position statements on collections, tick-borne diseases, and pollinator health published over the past year, are useful tools in ESA’s advocacy efforts on Capitol Hill. These statements are often employed by ESA’s government relations firm in meetings and will also be hand-delivered by ESA’s Science Policy Fellows next month when they participate in Capitol Hill meetings.

On the HBT Mission

5/13/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


James LearyJames Leary and his innovative herbicide ballistic technology are featured in a Hawaii News Now video, which goes aboard the helicopter used to scout out and shoot invasive miconia in Maui’s remote watersheds with a specially adapted paintball gun. James describes the process as performing weedectomy, because it can so specifically target the species to be destroyed. He explains that over 20,000 acres of watershed have been protected, at a cost of only $10 per acre, and that complete containment of miconia should only take 30 years using this method.

Feel the Burn

5/13/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Clay TrauernichtClay Trauernicht (NREM) is featured in a Hawaii News Now video on the increased wildfire risk Hawai‘i is facing this summer. He explains that although the El Nino is subsiding, summer is traditionally drier than winter, and winter’s rainfall was substantially less than normal, leaving a lot of lands susceptible to burning. The state’s drought will likely worsen over the summer and peak by early fall. Wildfires have already been up; the Division of Forestry and Wildlife is already over its fire-response budget by some $400,000. Clay reminds viewers that there are many things we can do to reduce fire risks; a new wildfire prevention and preparedness campaign will soon be launched to help.

Bear the ROD

5/13/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


JB FridayA new video from the San Diego Zoo features Extension forester JB Friday (NREM) discussing the ways to identify Rapid ‘Ohi‘a Death (ROD)—one of them is that infected wood smells like bananas!—and the devastating impacts of the disease. He emphasizes that the most important way to help stop the spread of the disease is not to move any ‘ohi‘a materials or the soil surrounding the trees while research is being undertaken to figure out possible ways to combat the problem.

Food Wasted, Food Saved

5/13/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Heather Fucini Joy Nagahiro-Twu and Mariah Martino at SEEQSFood waste—and what to do about it—is big news, and CTAHR’s in the midst of the discussion. Research by Matthew Loke and PingSun Leung (NREM) on food waste in Hawai‘i is highlighted in Civil Beat and Hawaii News Now—the state wastes a quarter of all food, $1 billion overall! This is less in terms of quantity than in other states but more in money because of the high food costs. This is scary but necessary information—because knowing is half the battle. The other half is doing something about it, which is where the Food Recovery Network (FRN) comes in. Follow-up articles in the Star-Advertiser and the Civil Beat on the dietetics students who started a food-saving revolution when they created a certified chapter of the FRN explain that thanks to the original publicity, more students have joined the FRN, and they can now collect food two days a week, doubling their impact. Two more organizations have also requested UH’s unsold food, the Youth Outreach drop-in center and the Next Step shelter.

CTAHR at CCD

5/13/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


CTAHR was integral to the 4th annual Conservation Career Day (CCD), held on Friday, April 23 on the UH Hilo campus. CCD is part of Teaching Change, a youth education program designed to inspire and empower the next generation of natural resource managers and scientists for Hawai‘i, from Hawai‘i. Teaching Change is a collaborative effort between CTAHR-NREM, the Institute of Pacific Islands Forestry, the US Fish & Wildlife Service, and the Friends of Hakalau Forest, amongst others. It’s headed by program manager Catherine Spina, and Creighton Litton (both NREM). CCD brings local land management and research science agencies together with higher-education programs related to natural resource management in Hawai‘i to encourage local middle and high school students to become environmental stewards and to pursue careers in natural resource management. CCD is held in collaboration with the annual Earth Fair organized by UH Hilo and Hawai‘i CC. This year, the event drew about 2,000 local students! Funding for the event was provided by The Learning Coalition, Kamehameha Schools, CTAHR, and NREM. Special thanks go to Amanda Knauf (NREM grad student) and ‘Olana Chow (NREM undergrad student, pictured right) for staffing a table on educational opportunities in CTAHR related to natural resource management.

The Plume on the Plumeria Conference

5/13/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Kauahi PerezTPSS grad student Kauahi Perez (pictured) and Emeritus horticulturist Richard Criley will be speaking at the 2nd International Plumeria Conference, sponsored by the Plumeria Society of America and the Naples Botanical Garden, in Naples, Florida on May 19–22. Rich Criley is the keynote speaker; he will be giving an overview of plumeria research in Hawai‘i since the 1960s, including breeding, propagation, culture and management, and post-harvest handling. He will also provide the pictorial introduction to a workshop on sewing plumeria lei, at which conference-goers will make their own lei. Kauahi will give a presentation on her research into plumeria DNA and the ways it can be used to determine how plumeria variants are related to one other. Their research is blooming!

Kaua‘i’s Got Awareness

5/13/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Laura at Kauai Ag Awareness 2016The Kaua‘i Agricultural Research Station hosted over 500 5th-grade students from around the island at the 20th Annual Agricultural and Environmental Awareness Day. Sponsored by CTAHR and the Kauai County Farm Bureau, the event was a great opportunity for students to learn about food, agriculture, and the environment. CTAHR presenters for a series of mini-classes included Laura Kawamura (FCS, pictured), Matt Stevenson (HNFAS), and Joshua Silva (TPSS). Terri Moats and Richard Ebesu (both PEPS) had display booths. There were representatives from large and small farms; federal, state, and county agencies; gardening clubs; businesses; and non-profit organizations. The fun and informative event was also a great expression of cooperation and partnership between CTAHR and its many partners throughout the Kaua‘i community. Special thanks go to Frank Matsuno, the Research Station farm crew, the Kauai Invasive Species Committee, and many Farm Bureau volunteers for planning, setting up, and taking down the event. Mahalo is also due to all the CTAHR faculty, government and community agencies, and businesses who volunteered their time and knowledge. The event is featured in the Garden Island, but note one error: Amanda Skelton is not with the Master Gardener program.

Plants…in…Spaaaace!

5/13/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Aleca Borsuk and Kent KobayashiAleca Borsuk, a senior Mechanical Engineering student in COE, presented her research with her mentor Kent Kobayashi (TPSS) into “Spatial Optimization of Artificial Lighting for Space Grown Amaranth” at the Spring 2016 Hawai’i Space Grant Consortium Fellowship & Traineeship Symposium. Aleca, a NASA Undergraduate Space Grant Fellow, demonstrated that crop yield of densely planted beds of Amaranthus tricolor can be enhanced solely by using spatial configuration of LED lighting, with no additional energy inputs or chemical treatments. This investigation is supported by the Hawai’i NASA Space Grant Consortium and provides insight into horticultural practices suitable for long duration spaceflight. Aleca will also be presenting her research at the 113th Annual Conference of the American Society for Horticultural Science in Atlanta, Georgia, in August.

Students of the Soil

5/13/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Student at Soil DayKaua‘i agents Joshua Silva (TPSS) and Matthew Stevenson (HNFAS) partnered with the Kaua‘i Soil and Water Conservation District and Natural Resources Conservation Service to host Soil Conservation Day 2016 at the Kaua‘i Agricultural Research Center. High school students from Waimea and Kaua‘i High Schools participated in the daylong event, learning about soil science, soil conservation, and careers related to soil. In preparation for the county and state Conservation Awareness Contests held in fall, students practiced different land-judging techniques such as determining soil texture by the feel method and differentiating soil horizons in a soil profile. By participating in these contests, students learn about land-use suitability and best management practices to protect our natural resources. Since 1988, Kaua‘i has won the state contest 11 times, and in recent years, has twice placed in the top ten in the national contest! Let’s cheer on these “students of the soil” as they compete against other Island high schools and bring home the state title once again!

Project Convocation

5/13/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Photo booth shot at CTAHR 2016 graduationOver 350 CTAHR students, with their families and friends, and CTAHR faculty and staff attended CTAHR’s Spring 2016 Convocation. The celebration, co-emceed by Lisa Kitagawa-Akagi and Irene Morrow, began with congratulations from Dean Gallo and CTAHR Alumni Association and Friends (CTAHR AAF) president Kauahi Perez. The Spring 2016 student marshals, Flora Wang and Ericka Yiu ( both FSHN), selected for their academic achievements, leadership and service to CTAHR and the university, were then recognized. Graduating students in CTAHR-affiliated student organizations were acknowledged, as were five students who completed the Dietetic Internship Program. The ceremony concluded with the individual recognition of 60 graduates. Then there were refreshments and a chance to mingle and capture memories in the photo booth. Congratulations and good luck to the graduating students! A big mahalo goes to all those who supported the graduating students, including ASUH for partially funding the event, Commuter Services for providing parking passes for the graduates, the Office of Admissions for use of the photo booth backdrop, CTAHR AAF for their support, Steven and Karen Sato for funding purchase of the lei, CTAHR scholarship recipients and student ambassadors for volunteering, and ASAO for the CTAHR memorabilia presented to the graduates and organizing the event.

Vulnerability and Threat

5/13/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Kaipo DyeKaipo Dye (NREM) recently was awarded a full travel and accommodations package by the Society of Conservation Biology (SCB) to present the findings of a global species analysis, “The multi-threat context of species vulnerability to climate change,” at the 2016 SCB Oceania conference in Brisbane, Australia. Kaipo, a second-year PhD student, has worked as a research analyst with the Pacific Islands Climate Change Cooperative (PICCC), an agency collaboration between UH, Hawaii Cooperative Study Unit (HCSU), and USGS’s Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center (PIERC). The paper based on this work, done in collaboration with Dr. Lucas Fortini, was published in the SCB’s scientific journal. Kaipo is also preparing for the IUCN world conference in Hawai‘i this fall, since much of the analysis was based on the IUCN species Red List of endangered species. The co-authors anticipate that this work should pave the way for future researchers to look at extinction from multiple perspectives, especially from the rich and diverse bio-cultural context that Hawai‘i offers.

Another Honor for Outstanding Alumna

5/13/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Diane RagoneDiane Ragone, director of the National Tropical Botanical Garden’s Breadfruit Institute and CTAHR’s 2015 Outstanding Alumna, has been awarded the Medal of Honor for excellence in horticulture from the Garden Club of America (GCA). The medal, which is given for outstanding service to horticulture, will be presented in a ceremony at GCA’s annual meeting in Minneapolis on May 22. In honoring Diane, the GCA said, “Her work is in every sense the epitome of the best in horticulture: quest for knowledge, preservation, conservation, research, creative experimentation, sharing, mentoring and fulfilling a humanitarian mission.” In her more than 30 years of working with breadfruit, she has researched, collected, and curated the world’s largest and most diverse collection in existence. She has conducted field research in over 50 Pacific islands to not only seek and collect rare varieties but also document the cultural knowledge associated with them that would have otherwise been lost.

Doctor’s Orders

5/13/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Nobuhisa MorimotoMS alumnus Nobuhisa Morimoto recently checked in after passing his medical boards at the Tokyo Medical and Dental University and advancing to become a resident. Nobu plans to become an internist, specializing in nephrology and/or endocrinology. He’s also interested in conducting research in these fields. He favors a holistic approach, explaining, “Besides treating my patients, I would like to help them adopt healthful dietary and exercise habits to prevent the onset of various chronic diseases.” He’s having a hard time deciding whether he’ll practice in Hawai‘i or Japan, but we hope he comes back! Nobu keeps in touch with CTAHR professors and friends and is working on research projects with Joannie Dobbs and Alan Titchenal (both HNFAS). His advice to those interested in pursuing a medical career is that it’s important to be passionate about being a health professional and to enjoy learning about how the body functions. There’s a tremendous amount of knowledge that one needs to digest during and after med school, he points out, which is much easier if you can enjoy the subject matter. He says, “Many individuals in CTAHR made a difference in my life, and I would like become someone who can make a difference in other people’s lives. I would like to do my best at each task so that as many people as possible in the world will become healthier and happier.” What a great prescription!

Nutrition Never Gets Old

5/13/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Maria Stewart at Kupuna presentationOn Friday, April 22 Maria Stewart presented nutrition workshops at the Kupuna Health and Safety Fair in Ewa. Over 100 senior citizens from the community attended the event, at which Maria presented practical approaches to maximizing health through diet in two workshops entitled “Eat Well, Stay Healthy: Nutrition for Healthy Aging.” The third annual event was sponsored by Ewa Weed and Seed, the Office of the US Attorney, and the Honolulu Police Department. This was the first time CTAHR was represented at the event, but the nutrition workshops were extremely popular, so it probably won’t be the last!

Coffee and Cream

5/13/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Jen Burt and Andrea Kawabata at Cream of the CropThe Kona Coffee Council recently held their annual Cream of the Crop event at the Sheraton Kona Resort and Spa at Keauhou Bay. This event brings in a large group of visitors, local residents, and coffee farmers—last year there were over 800 attendees. Jen Burt and Andrea Kawabata (both TPSS), with Rob Curtiss of the HDOA (l to r), had a booth at the event to share information about coffee quality, methods of coffee berry borer control, and invasive insect prevention.

Love the Land

5/13/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Sweetie Kuehu and CTAHR students at Aloha Sweetie Kuehu (HNFAS), Lehua Wall (HNFAS), Emily Cadiz (NREM), and Jessie Kai (HNFAS) (l to r), who are members of the group KaPA‘A (Ka Po‘e Aloha ‘Aina), participated in the Aloha Aina Fair for high school students at the Halau o Haumea Center for Hawaiian Studies and Ka Papa Lo?i o Kanewai. The fair, which included speakers, informational booths, and organizations focused on land-based practices, was part of the week-long teach-in and educational event Our Theory of Change (OTC) sponsored by Native Hawaiian Student Services. OTC also featured presentations and roundtable discussions on subjects ranging from la‘au lapa‘au and the meaning of kuleana to juvenile justice and socioeconomic inequality. Find out more about the event here.

Outstanding Contributions

5/13/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Kent KobayashiKent Kobayashi (TPSS) was selected as a fellow of the American Society for Horticultural Science (ASHS). He was recognized for his research on the use of microcomputers in horticulture, lights and plant growth, and Extension information systems, and for his significant role in ASHS committees. Six previous CTAHR faculty have also been selected as fellows, including, most recently, Richard Criley in 1992 and Bob Paull in 2014. Being elected as a Fellow is the highest honor that ASHS can bestow on its members, in recognition of truly outstanding contributions to the science, profession, or industry of horticulture and to the Society. Kent and other newly elected Fellows will be honored at the Awards Ceremony at the 113th ASHS Annual Conference in August in Atlanta, Georgia.

Green Day!

5/13/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Kristen Jamieson getting Green AwardNREM student Kristen Jamieson, who is the UH System student sustainability coordinator, was one of the students recognized by Governor Ige in his chambers for their work in producing the 4th Annual Hawai‘i Sustainability in Higher Education Summit. The Summit itself was recognized at the 2016 Hawaii Green Business Program (HGBP) awards ceremony with a Hawai?i Green Business Program Award for being a zero-waste event, including compostable plates, reusable utensils, no paper handouts or plastic bottles, carpooling and room-sharing, sustainable and locally sourced vegetarian fare, a service learning project, and Hawaiian cultural learning. Not only that, but all food waste from the event was collected for composting by SOFT members. The event brought together more than 150 faculty, staff, students, and administrators from all of the UH System campuses to work on strategic energy management, sustainability curriculum development, formalizing the Statewide Student Sustainability Coalition, and campus sustainability planning.

Educator Extraordinaire

5/13/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Charly KinoshitaAssociate Dean for Academic and Student Affairs Charly Kinoshita has received the Distinguished Educator Award from the North American Colleges and Teachers of Agriculture (NACTA), the premier organization in the U.S. with a mission of advancing the scholarship of teaching and learning in agricultural, environmental, natural and life sciences. The award, including a ceremonial plaque and life membership in NACTA, recognizes meritorious service to higher education and to NACTA through teaching, educational research, and/or administration. Charly wil be honored at the 2016 NACTA conference, which will be held in Hawai‘i on June 21 through 24 at UH.

Man, Oh, Manganese!

5/13/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Teresa LeMoonJoannie Dobbs and Alan Titchenal discuss the work of their FSHN MS student Teresa LeMoon in a recent Star-Advertiser column, “Too much of a ‘healthy’ diet can lead to severe problems.” Teresa’s research, for which she got the MS Student Poster Presentation Award of Merit at the recent Student Research Symposium, showed that several modern diets may be too high in manganese, but diets considered healthy, such as the “Mediterranean” diet and vegetarianism, can be even higher than an omnivorous diet. While manganese (Mn) is an essential nutrient, it can have irreversible neurotoxic effects when chronically consumed in excess amounts! Food types providing the greatest amounts of Mn were whole grains, nuts and seeds, and fruits. That’s not to say people shouldn’t eat these, but just keep your intake of Mn no more than 11 mg/day.

Elder Statesmen of Natural Resource Economics

5/13/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Chennat GopalakrishnanChennat Gopalakrishnan has a new book out titled Classic Papers in Natural Resource Economics Revisited, the culmination of seven years of work. In the short period the book has been out, it has received much praise, including from Nobel Prize-winning economist Robert Solow of MIT. The volume brings together classic papers in natural resource economics written by distinguished economists, five of them Nobelists, coupled with analyses by highly regarded scholars of how these papers have impacted the field. The papers represent the five core areas in natural resource economics: the intertemporal problem; externalities and market failure; property rights, institutions, and public choice; the economics of exhaustible resources; and the economics of renewable resources. Check it out!

International Inspiration

5/12/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Jinan BannaJinan Banna (HNFAS, pictured) has been appointed as the UHM Faculty Resident Director for Summer 2017 in Berlin, Germany. She joins other CTAHRites who have opened the door to cultural and academic learning in other countries for undergraduates: most recently, Wayne Iwaoka (HNFAS, ret.) in Machida, Japan, in Fall 2015; Anne Shovic (HNFAS) in Seville, Spain, in Spring 2016; and Soojin Jun (HNFAS) and Loriena Yancura (FCS) who will escort students to Lille, France, and Berlin, Germany, respectively, in Summer 2016.

SEOTY Stupendous

5/4/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Mandy Chen winning SEOTYUH System and state Student Employee of the Year Mandy Chen (ANSC) was recognized with the rest of UHM’s finest faculty, staff and students who had earned teaching, research, and service awards at the recent school-wide ceremony in Kuykendal Hall. Mandy’s also mentioned in this article. She’s owed the honors—the office of Academic and Student Affairs wouldn’t be the same without her!

Power to the PEEPle

5/4/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


2016 PEPS Peeps diorama winnersPEPS held its second, highly anticipated Peeps Diorama contest, with groups and individuals vying to present departmental, historical/political (the Manhattan PEEP-ject that created the atomic bomb; Hillary, Bernie, and Trump exhorting crowds of Peeps), pop-cultural (The Re-PEEP-enant, complete with marshmallow bear attacking a prone Leonardo diPEEPrio), and historical–pop-cultural (Hamilton’s duel with Aaron Burr, as dramatized in the hit new musical Hamilton) subjects. The most creative entry, which won first prize, was a rendition of a modern-art gallery circa 1912, complete with spectators admiring a large picture by Pablo PEEPcasso…a Cubist mosaic made entirely of the body parts of Peeps fitted together to create a giant Peeps chick face! Second and third place winners were the entomological collection of specimens of the family Peepidae and the overview of PEPS PEEPS Projects, including Nema the Toad and silversword monitoring. Peep, Peep, Hurray!

3MT, Whee!

5/4/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


3MT logoCTAHR had the one of the largest representations of any of the UHM colleges for participants and judges in the recent 3MT Competition, the first of its kind at the university. Grad student participants were given three minutes to explain their thesis or dissertation, using only a single static PowerPoint slide, doing justice to the complexity of the work while using terms that a layperson could understand. It’s a skill that’s necessary but not easy! Students included Michael Honda, Kazue Ishihara, Mahrukh Khawaja, Liangqun Lu, and Rick Shimshock from MBBE and Gregory Hoover from TPSS. Judges included Daniel Jenkins and Pratibha Nerurkar from MBBE and Kent Kobayashi, Noa Lincoln, and Michael Kantar from TPPS. Thanks are owed to all for helping to make the inaugural 3MT a success!

Don’t Just Wear a Lei, Plant a Tree!

5/4/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


JacarandaIn honor of May Day, or Lei Day, when wearing flowers is emphasized, emeritus Extension agent Norman Bezona offers strong arguments for planting trees and otherwise landscaping streets and other public areas as well as individual yards and gardens. It’s good for the environment; it makes urban spaces more beautiful, cool, and pleasant; it’s good for business, including tourism; and it makes people feel more connected with the natural world. He’s right—let’s plant trees!

April



A Walk in the Trees

4/27/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Richard CrileyRichard Criley (Emeritus, TPSS) will be leading a plant walk celebrating the Manoa campus’s recent designation as an arboretum on Friday, May 6, from 5:30 to 7:00 p.m. This tour is part of the annual Jane’s Walk, an international festival of free citizen-led walking tours encouraging people to explore their cities and connect with their communities and neighbors, on foot. The UHM campus has more than 500 different species of plants, and Rich Criley can tell you all about them! Other experts will talk about the campus’s cultural landscape, including historical buildings and associated artwork, on the walk.

International Influence

4/27/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Rachel NovotnyThis week is the last chance to register for the Awards Banquet, which will be held on Friday, May 6, at the Ala Moana Hotel—you’ll need to get your form in by Friday, April 29, if you want to secure your spot. At the Banquet you’ll be able to cheer such CTAHR stars as Rachel Novotny, winner of the inaugural award for Excellence in International Programs. Rachel has devoted her career to improving the health of children and adults through nutritional training and research, focusing on underserved populations in Latin America and throughout the Pacific. She’s established research and academic relationships with international agencies and Pacific/Asian countries and collaborated with such entities as the Food and Agriculture Organization, the World Health Organization, and the World Food Program. She’s PI for CHL, an innovative community-based program aimed at reducing childhood obesity in the Pacific region. CHL has created a much-needed infrastructure for child health monitoring and surveillance and provided scholarship training to graduate and undergraduate students from across the Pacific. Come celebrate Rachel and the other illustrious awardees at the Banquet! Here’s another thought: if you can’t make the date but still want to support the Centennial Scholarship Fund and CTAHR students, consider sponsoring a student to attend!

All Things Fashion

4/27/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Von Kaanaana, Moses Gouveia, Kari BegayThe time is now to secure your spot at the upcoming 50th UHM Fashion Show, Roots! The glam extravaganza will take place on Friday, May 1 in Kennedy Theatre. Tickets will be sold at the Campus Center on Thursday, April 28, from 10:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. This is your chance to support and witness the 50 years of UHM Fashion tradition, showcasing senior designers, junior designers, and, for the first time, UHM alumni designers! If you can’t get to the Campus Center, just contact Kira Krog at kirakrog@hawaii.edu for tickets. She can also answer your questions about VIP seats or about donating to the silent auction that will accompany the event. To hear more about the Fashion Show, check out this KITV interview with show director and junior designer Von Kaanaana and senior designers Kari Begay and Moses Gouveia, along with sneak peeks of their collections. This year’s CTAHR Awards Banquet will also pay tribute to the Silver Jubilee of UHM fashion, with stage decorations consisting of costumes from the show dating back to the ’60s. Come spark the lime-green cut-out maillot with matching floral wrap and sunhat from 1967!

Island Beetles

4/21/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Eva Brill presenting posterResearch support Eva Brill participated in the 100th Annual Meeting of the Pacific Branch of the Entomological Society of America earlier this month in Honolulu, at which 345 insect enthusiasts convened. Eva authored and presented the poster “Reproduction, feeding, and ecology of predatory flat bark beetles in a scolytine-infested agricultural landscape,” which provided current research on Leptophloeus sp., square-neck grain beetles (Cathartus quadricollis), and coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei) in Hawai‘i. Co-authors were USDA-ARS research entomologist Peter Follett and assistant Extension agent Andrea Kawabata. Eva also competed in the conference’s Texting Competition, a fun but challenging test of participants’ entomological knowledge and texting skills. With her acute knowledge and smokin’ fingers, Eva earned the highest number of points and won first place! She was recognized during the awards luncheon and received a beautifully mounted butterfly for her win. The Flat Bark Beetle (FBB) Project would like to acknowledge and thank their collaborators from Hawaii's coffee community, USDA, CTAHR and especially the Hawaii Department of Agriculture, for their funding and support of FBB research and outreach.

Extensive Accomplishments

4/21/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Lynn Nakamura-TenganAnother highly valued CTAHRite who will be honored at the Awards Banquet is Lynn Nakamura-Tengan (HNFAS), who’s been awarded the Dean’s Award for Excellence in Extension. Having grown up on a family farm in Kula, Maui, Lynn has done training on topics as varied as candling eggs for small producers, rat lungworm disease, and emergency preparedness. She’s a leader and critical member of nutrition and food safety Extension education across the state and nationally whose projects include Nutrition Education for Wellness, Good Agricultural Practices, and Germ City: Clean Hands–Healthy People. She’s developed a food safety program to educate consumers and food producers that’s a model of both distance and hands-on teaching; she is a champion at using technology to enhance and distribute Extension information to audiences across the state and globally. She has been crucial to the Extension and outreach preparation required for FSMA implementation in Hawai‘i, leveraging State funding and developing a statewide contingent of educators. A member of the inaugural class of the Western Extension Leadership Development program for Cooperative Extension professionals, she’s also a faculty representative for the University of Hawai‘i Professional Assembly. Come cheer Lynn and other awardees at the Banquet on May 6!

Who’s the Best?

4/21/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Mandy Chen winning SEOTYThe best student employee, that is. That would be CTAHR student—and CTAHR employee—Mandy Chen (center)! She won the coveted Student Employee of the Year (SEOTY) award for UHM and then went on to win SEOTY for the state, as well! Mandy, who’s majoring in ANSC, coordinates a number of student activities for the Office of Academic and Student Affairs. She’s been instrumental in keeping the college’s educational and outreach events for students well organized and smoothly running—everything from the one-day Agriculture and Environmental Awareness Day held at the Waimanalo Research Station for local fifth-graders to the two-week AgDiscovery program on the UHM campus for high-schoolers from around the country. She also coordinated much of the programming for the recent CTAHR/COE Student Research Symposium. Congrats, Mandy—and thanks! What’s amazing is that two other CTAHR students were also nominated for SEOTY—Heather Kalehuawehe (left) in FAMR, who works as a Theatre and Dance box office assistant, and Justeena Veltre (right) in FSHN, who’s a student supervisor for Financial Aid Services. Who’s the best? CTAHR students!

Fruitful Science

4/21/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Maria Stewart at Expanding Your Horizons 2016Two FSHN students—Flora Wang, center, and Shalynn McKee, right) assisted Maria Stewart (HNFAS, left) with a workshop entitled “Food Detectives” at the 2016 Expand Your Horizons event, an annual event that encourage girls in grades 6–8 to get involved with science, technology, engineering, and math. Maria, Flora, and Shalynn taught 28 girls, over the course of 3 interactive workshops, how to measure sugar in fruit using the Brix scale. Then the participants enjoyed the “fruits of their labors” at the end of each workshop by making a fruit smoothie. Check out the event website.

CTAHR Blooms at the Garden Fair

4/21/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


CTAHR presenters at Kauai Garden FairKaua‘i Cooperative Extension, in partnership with the Kauai County Farm Bureau, hosted the 21st Annual Kaua‘i Garden Fair on the grounds of Kaua‘i Community College on Saturday, April 16th. Laura Kawamura (FCS), Ted Radovich (TPSS), and junior Extension agents Kathryn Fiedler and Joshua Silva presented educational talks centered on the theme of “Let Food Be Your Medicine.” Richard Ebesu (PEPS) and Matt Stevenson (HNFAS) had display booths, the 4-H club had a petting zoo, and the Master Gardeners answered questions and gave away 500 pepper seed packets (10,000 seeds!) to stimulate interest in the Vegetable Show and Contest coming up in this summer’s Kauai Farm Fair. Almost 300 youths signed in to participate in keiki activities; attendance at the educational talks was among the highest ever recorded; and fairgoers took away 150 copies of CTAHR publications and handouts. Afterwards, the Farm Bureau congratulated CTAHR on its leadership and “the kind of public-private partnership Kauai is known for.”

Pass On, No Pass Back

4/21/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Dietetics students with Food Recovery groupDietetics students Victoria Duplechain, Joy Nagahiro-Twu, Heather Fucini, and Mariah Martin (left to right) provided leadership in launching the UH Manoa Chapter of the Food Recovery Network, which offers prepared but unused food to those who are less fortunate in the community, while at the same time reducing the negative environmental effects of food waste. The students have partnered with CTAHR alumna Donna Ojiri, Sodexo’s UH Manoa general manager, to give meals every Friday to the Institute for Human Services, which then distributes the food to homeless shelters on O‘ahu. They’ve already given over half a ton of food since the program started less than six months ago! As Donna explains, food that has already been served and discarded also gets repurposed—it’s distributed to Island pig farms. Win-win! Read more in the Star-Advertiser. You can check out the UH News video story too!

Multiplying Our Impact

4/21/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Cover of Q1 2016 Impact ReportThe first quarter’s Impact Report is out, and slated to be the start of a great new tradition—celebrating the many and various contributions of CTAHR’s volunteers! Volunteer Recognition Day is April 21, and the stories in this report help to thank and honor the many volunteers who help to make the college and their communities great. In 2014, almost 5000 volunteers—nearly ten times the number of faculty and staff in the college—contributed a total of 186,922 hours to helping the college help others. Henceforth, the first quarter’s Impact Report every year will be devoted to their achievements. Read about four different individuals and groups and the many ways they give back—one story for Maui, Kaua‘i, O‘ahu, and the Big Island—and be inspired!

Fashion at Fifty

4/21/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


UHM 2016 fashion show Roots logoDid you know that this year marks the CTAHR Senior Fashion Show’s 50h anniversary? The show’s theme, Roots, is appropriate to this important anniversary, reflecting on what has come before—in the department and in the history of fashion—which provides the roots for the glorious blossoming of fashion today. The show, on May 1 in Kennedy Theatre, will feature not only junior and senior student designers but also the work of alumni now established in the industry. Tickets are on sale now—contact Kira Krog at kirakrog@hawaii.edu. They’re $25 (or $45 for VIPs)—cash or checks only, please! The show’s director (and one of the designers!), FDM student Von Kaanaana, was recently featured on ‘Olelo’s Hawaii Fashion Now, hosted by Andy Reilly (FCS) to discuss the show and his part in bringing it all together. Need more updates? Follow the Fashion Show on Facebook and Instagram!

Seeding Sustainable Gardens

4/21/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Seeds from Glenn TevesDedicated gardeners are often seed collectors and seed savers. Recently, in Honokaa, they also got to be seed sharers, thanks to a seed exchange event for which CTAHR was a sponsor. Researchers and Extension agents from the college gave presentations and brought seeds, like these pictured from Moloka‘i agent Glenn Teves, and many other growers and backyard gardeners also shared their own seeds, cuttings, and roots. As an article about the event in the Hawaii Tribune Herald explains, seed exchanges are not only a fun and free way to replenish seed stocks: they also allow gardeners to keep alive genetic diversity that may be lost when small seed companies are bought up by large conglomerates, and to share and receive seeds that are particularly well suited for the individual microclimates and soil types of specific areas.

Honoring Dr. T

4/21/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Minoru Tamashiro being honoredEmeritus professor and noted termite researcher Minoru Tamashiro and his wife Polly were the center of attention at a special symposium held at the 100th conference of the Pacific Branch of the Entomological Society of America. Organized by Associate Dean Ken Grace and CTAHR alumni Nan-Yao Su and Faith Oi, “Honoring Prof. Minoru Tamashiro’s Contributions to Entomology – His Legacy and Academic Genes” brought together CTAHR alumni, colleagues, and one academic “grandson” of Dr. T’s, from Hawai‘i, the Mainland, Korea, and Taiwan. Speakers included former CTAHR associate dean for Extension and current Agricultural Liaison for the Honolulu Mayor’s Office Po-Yung Lai, and long-time UH Hilo Dean Jack Fujii, both pioneering termite researchers in their PhD work with Dr. Tamashiro. The speakers shared the impact of the their mentor’s work, advice, and life lessons on their own lives and professional careers, including memorable pau hana brain-storming sessions and the characteristic phrase “Miller Light, bucket ice!”

Symposium Stupendous

4/21/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Student Research Symposium 2016For the sixth year, CTAHR teamed with the College of Engineering (COE) to host the 28th annual Student Research Symposium. Roughly 300 students, faculty, staff, and guests gathered for a lively scholarly exchange in the Agricultural Science building on April 8 and 9 to marvel at the outstanding and innovative research that the students have accomplished. The Symposium gives students the chance to present their work in a friendly yet academic setting, while travel grant awards enable top students to share their research at national and international conferences. A large number of poster and oral presentations, 134, were given by undergraduate and graduate students in all six departments in CTAHR and three in COE. The topics spanned all stages of the process of research and development, and all forms of student learning: discovery; advanced diagnostics and lab testing; design, validation and field testing; adoption of new methods and technologies. The caliber of the students’ work was impressive! Here are CTAHR's illustrious winners. Thanks go to the student participants and faculty advisor/mentors, the judges and moderators, staff and student volunteers, and members of the Symposium Coordinating Committee. Thanks also go to USDA-NIFA for helping to f

Milky Way

4/21/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Marissa MadeiraWhat’s in your glass? In last week’s “Health Options” column, Alan Titchenal and Joannie Dobbs (both HNFAS) mention the research of their student, Marissa Madeira, who presented her findings at the Student Research Symposium last week. As they explain, Marissa searched out fourteen general types of plant-based “milk” made from nuts, seeds, grains, and soybeans and looked at their nutritional information, comparing it to cow’s milk. She concluded that many of these “milks” lack the full nutritional benefits of dairy, though some are fortified so as to make them comparable, and many of them also contain added sugars. Bottom line: read your labels and choose what’s right for you!

A Wide Range of Talents

4/21/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Donna MeyerAnother well-beloved and much-admired CTAHRite who will be honored at this year’s Awards Banquet is alumna Donna Meyer, winner of the 2016 Dean’s Award for Outstanding Service by an APT Employee. Donna has worked in the college for 36 years, since her undergraduate days. An integral part of many projects, including On-Farm Food Safety and Sustainable Pest Management, she has a broad range of skills and talents that makes her invaluable to each, from small-scale construction to the ability to present scientific and technical information in a form easily understandable by the general public. Her commitment to each project is exemplary; she travels to other islands and works outside of normal work hours and on weekends to complete tasks. She coordinates farm site visits, assists with workshops and field days, and helped to design and make a portable hot water spray tank for arthropod pest management. She not only performs laboratory work skillfully and conscientiously; she also assists in training students and other lab workers. As one recommender writes, “The college has gained stature and respect in the community because of Ms. Meyer’s work.” Come cheer Donna and other CTAHR awardees at the Banquet on May 6!

Soft Skills for the Hard Sciences—and Beyond

4/20/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Soft Skills imageMichael Cheang and Lynn Yamashita (both FCS) will be offering a new FamR class for the summer, FamR 491 - Life Skills for Success in the Workplace. Here are the stats: it’s 3 credits, CRN 97187, held June 13–July 1, Monday through Friday, 10:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Employers are increasingly asking that students be work ready, which includes being versed in “soft skills” as well as technical knowledge. This class can help. It should be very helpful for students to take before going out into the community for internships or jobs. It will focus on skills, especially “soft” skills, deemed essential by employers and supervisors; understanding the work culture and unwritten codes of conduct; important yet intangible concepts such as likeability, emotional intelligence, honesty, and ethics; and internship preparation and the job search process. It will real-life actual case studies to illustrate some of the common oversights made by students in internship and work settings.

GMOs: Both Sides of the Debate

4/13/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Hector ValenzuelaHector Valenzuela will be one of the speakers on a panel on GMOs hosted by the William S. Richardson School of Law’s Food Law & Policy Society. “Weighing the PROs & CONs of GMOs in Hawaii: A Civic Engagement Panel” will take place on Monday, April 18, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. in the Law School Building room CR2. Other speakers will be Joni Kamiya of Kamiya Papaya Farms, Gary Hooser of the Kauai County Council, and John Purcell, the VP for Business & Technology for Monsanto Hawaii.

Get Leafy

4/13/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Plants at Lyon ArboretumLyon Arboretum will be holding its annual plant sale on Saturday, April 16, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. There will be colorful ti varieties, native ferns, fruit trees, new anthurium varieties, orchids, heliconias, gingers, cactus, succulents, tillandsias and other bromeliads, roses, vegetable plants, herbs, and many other plants. Arboretum volunteers will sell jams and jellies made from local fruits, as well as oshibana crafts, spring wreaths, hand-painted ceramic pots, and leaf angels. Hawaiian honey will also be for sale. There’s a free shuttle service that picks up and drops off at the Po'elua Street and Manoa Road intersection and the Nipo Street and Manoa Road intersection.

Stars of HNFAS

4/7/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Doug Vincent and Rebekah MoralesTwo of the illustrious awardees who will be celebrated at this year’s Awards Banquet are Doug Vincent, Ka Pouhana (Mentor) winner, and Rebekah Morales, Ka Hana Po‘okela honoree. They are both in HNFAS, but that’s not their only connection: Rebekah is president of the Pre-Veterinary Club for which Doug is faculty advisor, and they both share a strong commitment to furthering the work of the college. Doug not only has previously received the Ka Pouhana award; he also has been honored with the CTAHR Excellence in Teaching award and the UH Presidential Citation for Meritorious Teaching, all indications of his generous commitment to helping students learn and succeed. Rebekah, a junior majoring in Animal Sciences, was previously treasurer and vice-president of the Pre-Vet Club, and whatever her position has worked hard to make the club a vibrant and positive organization offering important educational, networking, and mentoring opportunities as well as positive social interaction amongst the members. Come to the Banquet on May 6 to applaud Doug and Rebekah and the rest of CTAHR’s best and brightest!

In Bangkok

4/7/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Andy ReillyAndy Reilly (FCS) recently presented his research at the Rural Development Conference in Bangkok, Thailand. Andy is part of a multi-state organizing committee, comprised of eleven people from seven institutions, that is charged with developing a proposal and seeking funding to address LGBT people living in rural communities. Andy made a presentation on an outcome of their first meeting, “Development of a theoretical model to study LGBT people living in rural areas in the United States of America.” He was sponsored in part by the Research Office and FCS.

No Horsin’ Around With This Group!

4/7/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Na Lima 4-H groupRecently the newest 4-H Club on the Big Island, Na Lima A Me Na Pu’uwai O Kohala, held its 1st Annual Horse Show. Hawai‘i County 4-H Livestock agent Becky Settlage conveys the club’s appreciation for the support they have received from their families and community. Everyone worked hard over the past several months turning an overgrown pasture into corrals and an open arena area in which the members could ride. During this same time, members were learning about horses and horsemanship. It all culminated in the day-long event, which allowed these 4-H club members to show off all that they had been working on and to compete in the following classes: Western Horsemanship, Barrel Racing, Pole Bending, Dummy Roping, Trail Course, and Calf Penning. Besides the getting to watch the competition, attendees at the Horse Show enjoyed a petting zoo, pony rides, silent auction, and great food! At the end of the day, recognition and awards were given out. Photos from the event are at the East Hawaii 4-H & Hawaii County 4-H Livestock Facebook page.

Healthy Ways for Hectic Days

4/7/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Jason McMurrayWe all could use some help eating and living well on the go. Senior dietetics student Jason McMurray is interning with Emily Boll, owner of the fitness company Boot Camp Hawaii. He’s learning how she runs her business, joining in on appointments with clients that she individually coaches and assisting and observing Emily as she runs a 6-week wellness program for the faculty and staff of Kamehameha Schools (KS). He recently made a video with her as a project so they could get some experience making online video content. In it he demonstrates ways he’s learned to incorporate a concern for wellness as a busy college student. It is a look at his daily routine, which incorporates tricks and technique’s he’s developed for eating and living healthily. The title is “Healthy Living for the Hectic Lifestyle.” And don’t we all have a hectic lifestyle? Check it out!

On His Turf

4/7/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Curtis KonoCTAHR alumnus Curtis Kono, grounds superintendent at Oahu Country Club, was recently featured in the Star-Advertiser. Curtis, who holds a BS in Horticulture, was selected as the Golf Course Superintendent of the Year by the Hawaii Golf Course Superintendents Association (HGCSA) for 2011. He’s also an accomplished golfer, the Hawaii State Junior Match Play champion in 1968 and Manoa Cup champion in 1987 and multiple winner of the HGCSA Annual Tournament. He’s also been a volunteer crew member at the Masters, Augusta National, Open Championship at Royal Birkdale, and U.S. Open at Shinnecock, the article reports. There’s more on Curtis here!

Defeating Deforestation

4/7/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Kimberly CarlsonKimberly Carlson (NREM) was one of six guest speakers with UH ties who addressed the UH Foundation’s Heritage Society last week at the Hawai‘i Prince Hotel. She described her research on whether commodity certification can reduce the growing deforestation of Indonesian forests for rapidly expanding industrial-scale palm oil plantations. About 180 people attended the symposium, which also featured coastal geologist Chip Fletcher, geneticist Steven Ward, historian Colette Higgins, Coach Laura Beeman, and alumnus native plant grower Rick Barboza as examples of the range of UH expertise. The Heritage Society includes alumni, faculty, and friends of the university who have made a will, trust, beneficiary designation, or life-income gift to UH Foundation to benefit UH. Addressing the group over lunch, President David Lassner stressed the importance of private giving in augmenting state and tuition funding. In the audience were several CTAHR retirees and alumni who already have taken that message to heart!

Teaching Them to Fish in Indonesia

4/7/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Steven Chiang in IndonesiaSteven Chiang has just returned from the Asian Food and Agribusiness Conference in Bandung, Indonesia, which had the theme of “Strengthening Public–Private Sector Partnerships for Sustainable, Competitive Agribusiness.” Participants came to the conference from 15 countries, and they surely left edified by Steven’s two presentations, which included the keynote speech, “Entrepreneurial Government: Opportunity-Based Public–Private Partnerships.” His other presentation was “Teach Them to Fish or Buy Them the Pole: Successful Facilitative Models.” The conference was organized by the Ministry of Agriculture and the Ministry of Manpower and Transmigration of the Republic of Indonesia and coordinated by the Asian Productivity Organization.

Avos on the Move

4/7/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


avocados from HawaiiHawai‘i has just sent its first shipment of avocados to the mainland in 25 years, and CTAHR helped to make it happen! The Sharwil avocado has been cleared for export, but a lot of planning has gone into making that a reality. Alyssa Cho and Andrea Kawabata (both TPSS) have been working with a group of agencies and organizations including the County of Hawai‘i Department of Research and Development, APHIS, the Hawaii Food Basket (a APHIS-approved facility), and a group of growers to set up a pilot program for the November–March export season. The first shipment was sent out, and samples were sent to other potential markets. As Alyssa explains, “Exporting Sharwil avocados could provide a high-value market for our avocado growers, helping them to remain profitable.” Read about it in this article in West Hawaii Today!

All in the CTAHR Family

4/7/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Kacie KajiharaFourteen faculty, staff, and grad students from CTAHR volunteered as judges in the 59th Hawaii State Science and Engineering Fair and got to marvel at the accomplishments of Hawai‘i’s best and brightest middle- and high-school students. Thanks to those who generously mentored the next generation of scientists and engineers at this year’s Fair. With funding from USDA-NIFA, on behalf of all campuses in the UH system, CTAHR presented a $500 award to Kacie Kajihara, an eleventh grader at Kalani High School, who performed research under the mentorship of Janice Uchida (PEPS) and grad student and APT research support Peter Toves (TPSS), as well as her teacher at Kalani, Kenneth Okawa., Kacie’s project, “Tissue Culture of the Hawaiian Papaya,” shows promise for increasing the efficiency and reducing the cost of growing papaya in Hawai‘i through clonal propagation. Kacie was also judged best in the senior Plant Sciences categoryand received a $100 award from the CTAHR Alumni Association; she’s pictured here with CTAHR Alumni Association president and TPSS grad student Kauahi Perez. Kacie will represent Hawai‘i in next month’s International Science and Engineering Fair in Phoenix, Arizona. She’s got other CTAHR connections: not only is her sister Lexie an undergraduate student in Biological Engineering, but her grandfather got his degree in ag education here and still at 93 has a passion for ag!

Lots of Energy for Research

4/7/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Samir KhanalAnother illustrious CTAHRite who will be celebrated at this year’s Awards Banquet is Samir Khanal (MBBE), winner of the award for Excellence in Research. Samir is an internationally recognized researcher in biofuel and environmental biotechnology fields who has played a critically important role in establishing research that promotes sustainability through the interface of bioenergy and bio-based products with the environment, focusing on the needs of Hawai‘i and the Pacific. He has generated more than $3 million in research grants and an impressive array of publications, including two best-selling books on bioenergy and biotechnology. Some of Samir’s more recent activities and honors include being selected to serve as an International Advisor for Korea University’s Environmental Engineering Program, being selected to deliver the keynote speech at the International Waste Working Group-Asian Regional Branch symposium in Seoul, Korea, and being invited by Illan University in Taiwan to explore and discuss emerging research areas in energy and the environment. Come cheer Samir and other CTAHR awardees at the Banquet on May 6! Information about the other awardees and links to online or department registration are available at the website.

March



Amongst the Elites

3/30/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Shilva ShresthaMBBE alumna Shilva Shrestha, who completed her MS in Fall 2015 under the guidance of Samir Khanal, has been accepted into the Environmental Engineering Program at University of Michigan Ann Arbor to begin in Fall 2016. Admission to this program is highly competitive; it ranks in the top 5 in the nation. Congratulations and best wishes, Shilva!

A Fertile Topic

3/24/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Tia SilvasyTia Silvasy (MS student, TPSS) gave a well-received presentation at the East-West International Graduate Student Conference on the Asia-Pacific Region. She was the first presenter of the day, in the session “Green is the New Black: Innovative Approaches in Land-based Resource Management,” which also included presenters from Canada and Nepal. Tia had good attendance in her session, entitled “Utilization of Tankage, an Organic Local Fertilizer, for Crop Production in Hawai‘i”; the attendees were engaged and had lots of questions for her. Clearly an idea whose time has come! Tia also works as an agricultural instructor at Windward Community College.

What a Waste!

3/24/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Food wasteMatthew Loke and PingSun Leung (both NREM) are referenced and quoted in the article “Wasted” in Hawaii Business Magazine, which discusses the amount of food that is wasted in the Islands, the implications of this waste, and what to do about it. The article builds off a paper that Matt and PingSun recently published in the Journal of Waste Management and Research. Matt points out that while people in Hawai‘i waste less food than do people in other states—which he attributes to its higher cost here—we still waste about a quarter of all food used here! Most commonly thrown-away foods include fresh fruits and vegetables, seafood, and rice. An important site of waste is hotel buffets—which is why many places are shifting to cooked-to-order items, instead. Some ways to help curb waste include donating unused food from restaurants or supermarkets to food harvest organizations that feed the homeless, and diverting unused food to more productive areas than the landfill, including composting and energy-generation. Read it—it’s an eye-opener!

Welina Manoa!

3/24/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Welina Manoa tour of Insect MuseumA group of community supporters stopped by Gilmore Hall recently for a Welina Manoa tour. The visit was coordinated by CTAHR partners at UH Foundation and Manoa Alumni Engagement. Lots of insects were on hand to enhance the welcome: the guests got a close-up look at the popular Honeybee Project, Insect Museum, and Kamehameha Butterfly Project.

The Poison Is the Cure

3/24/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


tarantulaJon-Paul Bingham (MBBE) was quoted in a recent article about the use of tarantula venom to create pain-relief drugs. Though he’s not involved in this study, which is still at an earlier stage, he’s familiar with the concept, having used it in his pioneering research into the use of cone-snail venom for similar purposes. He points out that the goal is to be able to replicate the necessary chemicals in the lab once they have been isolated from the original venom: nature, he suggests, should in this case be used as a template.

Knowledge Grows on Trees

3/24/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Tiele Doudt and Beau ShishidoAt the recent 10th Annual Avocado Festival in Kona, two groups from CTAHR presented some tender and delectable educational material. Students from Ted Radovich’s (TPSS) SOFT program, Tiele Doudt and Beau Shishido (pictured) offered information on avocado production, while Maria Stewart and Jessie Kai (HNFAS) presented nutrition information on the fat-rich but still-healthy fruit. In addition to the educational displays, Maria participated in a Q&A session about nutrition, and all of the CTAHR representatives assisted with the avocado tasting, when festival attendees had the opportunity to taste over a dozen types of avocados from the Big Island.

Heroes in the Fight

3/24/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


JB Friday and James LearyThe Hawai‘i Invasive Species Awareness Week (HISAW) awards have been announced for 2016, and CTAHR is well represented! Extension forester JB Friday (NREM) is one of three scientists (along with Lisa Keith and Chip Hughes) recognized with the Greatest Hit award for their roles in investigating and combatting Rapid ‘Ohi‘a Death, which is killing the iconic native ‘ohi‘a forests of the Big Island. James Leary (NREM) was awarded the MVP award for Maui County for his innovative creation and deployment of Herbicide Ballistic Technology. The herbicide-containing “ammo” shot from a modified paintball gun, either on the ground or from a helicopter—has allowed HBT operators to kill off over 3000 invasive miconia in hard-to-reach locations in East Maui. Watch out, invasives—CTAHR’s on the job!

The Next Crop of Gene-iuses

3/24/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Student at Gene-ius Day with test tubeThere’s a new video on the Gene-ius Day program available on the UH System website. Gene-ius Day, started in 2006 by Ania Wieczorek (TPSS), has by now reached more than 5000 elementary and middle-school students, showing them the excitement of science and the important place that STEM concepts and agriculture have in their lives. Gene-ius Day educators come to students’ classrooms with hands-on activities involving DNA, microscope work, and more, inspiring them to want to become scientists.

Fascination With Dragons

3/24/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Bobbie Yee and Shu Hwa LinShu Hwa Lin (FCS, center) recently spoke in the Hamilton Library on the influence of Chinese traditional dragon robes and Ming vases on modern fashion. She showed examples, including gowns and jackets by designers Gucci, Dior, Furstenberg, and Jason Wu, who is a favorite of Michelle Obama. Her own interest was sparked by the need to do research to provide answers when people asked her questions about imperial clothing. For instance, did you know that a single robe can take a team two years to produce? In one case, a wedding gown took ten years! Each robe is rich in symbolism that tells a story, such as the sun and moon in circlets on the shoulders that signal the robe is for an emperor. Excited to discover that the UH Costume Collection contains ten Qing Dynasty robs, Shu Hwa embarked on a hobby research project that resulted in her 2013 book Qing Imperial Costume Design: Yin-Yang Philosophical Influences.

Aloha NU!

3/24/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


NU students with Peter Toves at MagoonEnvironmental Science students from Nagasaki University recently toured the Magoon Research and Instructional Facility. The students were hosted by Kapi‘olani Community College’s International Program. Tomoaki Miura (NREM) and Joe DeFrank (TPSS), along with PhD students Peter Toves (pictured, right) and Sumeth Wongkiew and station manager Craig Okazaki, were on hand to greet the guests from Japan. The students experienced a wide variety of projects, including non-chemical weed control, aquaponics, flower breeding, turf management, remote sensing of vegetation dynamics, and even a competitive round of “Hawaiian-Style Bocce Ball”!

Awareness Is Good

3/24/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Students at 2016 Ag and Environmental Awareness DayThe Waimanalo Research Station held its Ag and Environmental Awareness Day and open house on Friday and Saturday. Exhibits included taro, cacao, and native sugarcane, or ko. The UH Honeybee Project showed how honey is extracted from the comb, and MBBE students demonstrated ways of creating bioenergy. Station tours were conducted, and guests got to see the new learning pavilion Hale o Pu‘u o Kona. Funding support was provided by USDA through CTAHR’s Agribusiness Education, Training, and Incubation Program. Associate Dean of Academic and Student Affairs Charly Kinoshita gave a warm welcome in the middle of the morning. Thank yous go to the Waimanalo Research Station staff and volunteers, ASAO staff, and Urban Garden Center staff for planning and setting up the event. Also, a big mahalo is due to the CTAHR faculty and staff, government agencies, community members, and company representatives who volunteered their time and knowledge for the presentations and exhibits at the Friday and Saturday events. Check out the video!

Tree People

3/24/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Andy KaufmanThe UH Manoa campus has recently been designated as an accredited arboretum by the Morton Arboretum’s ArbNet, which is the world’s only arboretum accreditation program. Richard Criley (TPSS), who used to take classes of students around the campus to identify trees, is quoted in the UH News Story about the honor, pointing out that few universities share this designation. He and Andy Kaufman (TPSS, pictured) are also quoted in a story in the Star-Advertiser; Andy mentions that lots of tourists contact him to ask about viewing the trees on the campus. The designation as an arboretum is inspiring those who want to add to the more than 500 species that already grow on the grounds.

The Plants They Carried

3/24/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Maui Master Gardeners at Ag in the ClassroomOn March 3 and 4 Maui Master Gardeners represented CTAHR at the annual Ag in the Classroom event sponsored by the Maui Farm Bureau and hosted at Haleakala Ranch. The Master Gardeners taught the kids about canoe plants—including ‘ulu, ko, kalo, milo, and others—and why the Polynesians brought them. Ag in the Classroom teaches kids about where food comes from and why agriculture is important to everyone. This year the Maui event drew about 700 2nd-graders from nine schools. They also learned about farming, ranching with the help of herding dogs, the dangers of invasive species, and the importance of a healthy watershed.

Growing Green

3/24/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


HGG at recognitionInterim Associate Dean for Extension Kelvin Sewake recently attended a recognition of the Hawaii Green Growth group, for which he is the CTAHR member, hosted by Hawaii State Senator Mike Gabbard at the State Capitol. CTAHR, along with UH System, is part of this initiative’s working group, which brings Hawai‘i’s energy, food, and environmental leaders together to achieve sustainability in the Islands and to be a model for integrated green growth.

New Faces: Marisol Quintanilla-Tornel

3/24/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Marisol Quintanilla-TornelMarisol Quintanilla-Tornel has been hired as a junior Extension agent at the Komohana Agriculture Research & Extension Center with a focus on Sustainable Agriculture and Organic Farming. Marisol earned her Ph.D. in Entomology and Nematology at Michigan State University, studying nematode community structure. She earned her M.S. in Entomology, studying the effect of rotation crops on nitrogen mineralization and nematodes. Marisol comes to CTAHR with a broad range of experience, from serving as the Plant Protection Program leader, entomologist, and nematologist for Northern Marianas College, administering a grape farm in Chile, and working as a junior researcher at CTAHR under Mark Wright and Koon-Hui Wang. Please welcome her!

One More Benefit of Education

3/24/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Jenjira YahirunCOF assistant researcher Jenjira Yahirun and co-authors have published a study of “Adult Children’s Education and Parents’ Functional Limitations in Mexico” in the highly regarded journal Research on Aging. This study from the Mexican Health and Aging Study looked at how adult children’s education level influences their aging parents’ physical health, with the assumption that in Mexico, especially, older adults rely on kin, primarily children, as supports where access to institutional resources might be lacking. Aging parents whose children had completed high school were less likely to report any functional limitations, compared to those with no children who had completed high school. The association remained when accounting for parental income, including adult children’s financial transfers to parents. The authors concluded that there are “upstream” influences of adult children’s education on their parents’ health and that children’s higher education may protect parents from deteriorating health conditions in later life.

Why It Works

3/24/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


GM papayaThe latest issue of Biotech in Focus is now available. It discusses the mechanism behind the disease resistance of the ‘Rainbow’ and SunUp’ papayas genetically altered to resist Papaya Ringspot Virus—when they were first created, researchers didn’t fully understand how the resistance was caused; they just knew it worked. Now the process is better understood: it has to do with RNA interference, or RNAi. Find out more here, and check out back issues of Biotech in Focus as well.

Mineral Rights

3/24/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Mark ThorneMark Thorne (HNFAS) was recently awarded a Research and Education Grant in the amount of $332,601 for the “Development of Individual Free-Choice Mineral Supplementation Program for Sustainable Grazing Management of Hawaii's Rangelands.” Mineral supplementation is an important livestock management strategy to maintain and improve animal performance, necessary in many regions to correct for one or more mineral nutrient deficiencies in livestock forages. According to Mark, many commercial products used by livestock producers are designed through generalizations of animal requirements, without considering factors that determine the mineral composition of forages grazed by livestock in different geographical locations. Hawai‘i livestock producers have struggled for over three decades with mineral supplementation issues, since commercial pre-mixed mineral products are inadequate at meeting the different mineral needs of Hawaii’s ranches. He will investigate the feasibility of individual free-choice mineral supplementation in Hawaii and develop a decision support tool to assist livestock producers in developing a mineral supplementation program specific to their operation. Congratulations!

Nutritionally Sound

3/24/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Maria StewartCongratulations to Maria Stewart (HNFAS) for being given the Excellence in Teaching Award! It’s well deserved. Maria creates an intellectually safe community of learners in her classroom, allowing students to share alternate points of view, admit what they don’t understand, and think critically about the material. Her students praise her professionalism, accessibility, and strong command of the subject matter of nutrition; those who joined her on her study-abroad classes in Japan rave about the culturally and intellectually educational experience she provided for them. Come congratulate Maria and the other CTAHR stars at the 28th Annual Awards Banquet on Friday, May 6!

CTAHR Alumnae in Action

3/24/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Jordie Ocenar and Bonnie DietrichTwo CTAHR alumnae were working at the recent Ag Day at the Capitol, Jordie Ocenar (left) and Bonnie Dietrich. Jordie got her bachelor’s degree in PEPS, and both she and Bonnie received their MS in Entomology. Jordie is a pest control technician for plant pathologists at HDOA’s biological control section, and Bonnie is a USDA Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey entomologist at HDOA. CTAHR was well represented by current students, faculty, and staff as well: presenters included, from TPSS, Andy Kaufman on landscape issues, Ted Radovich's grad student Tia Silvasy with sustainable and organic farming displays, and Alyssa Cho with macadamias, and from PEPS, Zhiqiang Cheng on invasive species, Mark Wright on food crop pests, and three of Koon Hui Wang’s graduate students on sustainable soils, plus a Rapid 'Ohi'a Death display from JB Friday (NREM). Also presenting were the GoFarm farmer training program and, on farm food safety, Lynn Nakamura-Tengan and Shauna Sibonga (HNFAS), joined by junior Extension agents Kathryn Fiedler, Sharon Motomura, and Kiersten Akahoshi.

The Land’s Not for Burning

3/24/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Clay TrauernichtClay Trauernicht was interviewed for a Hawaii News Now story about the recent wildfire in Nanakuli, which burned about 2,500 acres. The state has already used up its fire response budget, but the start of the new fiscal year is more than four months away. This increase in wildland fires is due in part to El Niño, but there’s more to the story: Clay says that the area burned per year statewide has increased 400 percent within the past couple of decades. He explains that much of the problem is the decrease in plantation agriculture and ranching, which has left much more land unmanaged and more susceptible to burning. He also points out that although fewer acres burn in Hawai‘i than on the Mainland, the percentage of area is just as high, sometimes higher, than in the western states.

Keep the CBB Info Coming!

3/24/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Jen Burt at Koa coffee expoCTAHR was busy in the coffee world last week! Ray Carruthers (PEPS) and Andrea Kawabata (TPSS) co-hosted two daylong events, the Coffee Berry Borer Summit and Coffee Berry Borer Conference. The Summit, held at the Komohana Research and Extension Center in Hilo, brought together 29 scientists, economists, educators, and stakeholders for presentations, Q&A sessions, and networking. Participants learned about local and national area-wide programs and current CBB research projects and Extension efforts. The Conference, held in Kailua-Kona, drew 171 people, including researchers, Cooperative Extension, farmers, and stakeholders, for presentations and panel discussions by growers, processors, scientists, and educators. Last but not least, the Kona Coffee Farmers Association (KCFA) held their annual Coffee Expo, at which Andrea and Jen Burt (Kona Extension) shared a booth with HDOA to talk with farmers and visitors about coffee quality, CBB, current research, and invasive insects. They also had kits available for farmers, one for rearing the local CBB predator the flat bark beetle and the other for checking for little fire ants. Andrea also promoted her coffee website, which provides information on CBB integrated pest management, coffee research and outreach, and ag-related events and announcements. Pictured are Jen and HDOA’s Stacey Chun talking to growers at the Expo.

The Mite, the Virus, the Crumpled Wing

3/24/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Scott Nikaido and Ethel VillalobosEthel Villalobos (PEPS) was given a signal honor by Science magazine, being asked to write a Perspectives article to accompany a phylo-geographic study on DWV (deformed wing virus) and its vector the Varroa mite. Infected insects develop with crumpled, shrunken wings and are unable to fly, and therefore cannot find food for themselves or pollinate crops. Her article, titled “The mite that jumped, the bee that traveled, and the disease that followed,” provides context to the study by examining, in lay terms, the historical movement of managed European honeybee colonies out of their native range. It shows how human transport of managed hives had unforeseen repercussions with respect to bee health. The European bee was exposed to new environments and was placed in contact with the Asian honeybee and its parasites. One parasitic mite, Varroa destructor, “jumped” host species to the European bee and became a vector of previously mild viral diseases, in particular the DWV, which is now amplified in virulence due to mite transmission.

Groooovy, Man

3/16/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Shu Hwa Lin with 70s womenPolyester? Check. Orange and purple? Check. Psychedelic patterns? Check! Shu Hwa Lin (FCS) has curated an exhibit of 1970s women’s wear selected from the UH Costume Collection that’s now showing in Miller 112. It will run until March 17 and is open from 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., so come on by and get your groove on!

February



Super CTAHRites Meet SuperPro!

2/25/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Students using SuperProNine CTAHR students and five faculty participated in a SuperPro Designer training workshop in Gilmore Hall on February 18-19. SuperPro, the wildly popular comprehensive process simulator being used at roughly 500 industrial sites and 500 universities worldwide, facilitates modeling and optimization of batch and continuous processes, cost of goods analysis, cycle time reduction, environmental impact assessment, and other operations. The training workshop, sponsored in part by the college, began with theoretical analyses of basic industrial processes, and followed with hands-on training on SuperProDesigner and SchedulePro. Student and faculty trainees learned how to model, optimize and perform economic analyses of various industrial processes, including biotech, chemical, food, environmental, and consumer product industries.

Growing College Spirit

2/18/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Spring Event 2016About 150 happy fair-goers turned out for the Spring Event last week, enjoying hot dogs, popcorn, and shave ice; mugging for the caricature artist (Charly Kinoshita as Superman? It fits!); and competing in games to win prizes (plants, of course—it’s CTAHR!) and plunge unsuspecting faculty in the dunking booth. They also generously donated almost $170 to the college’s chapter of Phi Upsilon Omicron, a national honor society in Family and Consumer Sciences. The group raises money for scholarships for its members, does services projects for the community, and encourages personal and academic excellence and the advancement of family and consumer sciences. Check out pix of the fun time here!

Fight ROD!

2/18/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Rapid Ohia DeathJB Friday (NREM) is working to increase funding and awareness to address Rapid ‘Ohi‘a Death, which is estimated to have killed 100,000 trees on 34,000 acres on the Big Island already. He’s quoted in the Hawaii Tribune-Herald’s recent article about House Bill 1597, which “directs the state Department of Agriculture to research and report on the causes and possible control measures” for ROD and which was passed on the first day of the session. He also lends his expert knowledge to Lyon Arboretum’s crowdfunding campaign, which is raising money to collect and bank varieties of ‘ohi]a seeds, which can be endemic to a single island, until the disease is addressed and reforestation efforts can begin. The very persuasive campaign is seeking $35,000 for collecting trips, collaboration with other agencies, and long-term storage, and it has raised almost half of that goal in just five days. Check it out and give some #ohialove!

Paradox Unraveled

2/18/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Kevin and ThomasResearcher Gernot Presting (MBBE) and three postdoctoral scholars in his lab, Kevin Schneider and Thomas Wolfgruber (both pictured) and Zidian Xie, have solved a question that has long puzzled genomics researchers: why the centromere evolves so quickly. In a detailed study of dozens of pure-breeding strains of corn, they determined that intense selection for centromere-linked genes encoding key genes was responsible for the frequent turnover of centromere repeats in the corn centromere, though not in its wild, inedible ancestor teosinte. They discovered that retrotransposons, genes that “jump” from one part of the chromosome to another, also play a major role in this turnover. Read their article in PNAS!

His Research on Silverswords Is Golden

2/18/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Paul Krushelnycky with silverswordsPaul Krushelnycky (PEPS) and co-authors published a paper in Climate Change Responses that shows how shifting atmospheric circulation patterns that may be caused by climate change are threatening populations of the iconic silversword on Haleakala. The native plant is found nowhere else in the world. The team researched the effects of changes in temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation on populations of silverswords, using 80 years of data records and discovered that the Haleakala silversword numbers have declined about 60 percent since 1990, a decline coinciding with lower rainfall in the area.

On the Catwalk, With Dragons

2/18/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Dress fashioned after a dragon robeWant to see some fashion fit for an empress? Come to Shu Hwa Lin’s (FCS) talk “Fashion Styles in the Runways With Dragons” on March 1, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., in Hamilton Library Rm. 301. Shu Hwa will show the UH Costume Collection’s ten imperial dragon robes and will discuss a variety of modern fashion designs that draw inspiration from magnificent royal robes like these. While you’re in the library, you’ll also get a chance to check out—or revisit—the costume exhibit “In Style: Celebrating 50 Years of UHM Costume Collection,” on display in Hamilton Library’s first-floor Bridge Gallery until March 11. And make sure you come back to Hamilton for the UHM Costume Museum Exhibition presented by FDM460 Costume Museum Management students, which will be up March 9–16.

A Matter of Life and Death

2/18/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Couple in silhouette, domestic violenceFindings on a paper written by Ann Pobutsky (COF) and co-authors on domestic violence fatalities were recently highlighted on Hawaii News Now. “Results From the Hawai‘i Domestic Violence Fatality Review, 2000–2009,” published in the Journal of Injury and Violence Research, found that Filipinas were overrepresented among fatalities in comparison to their percentage of the population, while Native Hawaiian women were underrepresented. Let’s hope that growing awareness of this important issue makes all those numbers go down!

FSHN for Health

2/18/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


FSHN Council at Keiki RunFSHN Council members entertained and distributed healthy breakfast bags to over 2300 children on Saturday in partnership with the 2016 Keiki Great Aloha Run. This year over $35,000 was raised and will be donated to 115 O‘ahu schools in support of their Nutrition Education and PE programs. The 1.5 mile run promotes healthy and active lifestyles among Hawai‘i youth in accordance with the teachings of the Hawaii 5210 initiative: that’s 5 fruits and vegetables, 2 or less hours of screen time, 1 hour of physical activity and 0 sugary beverages each day. Sounds like a good plan for all of us!

Securing Food Security

2/18/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


12@12 Food Security graphicThe next installment of the 12@12 Collaboration Works! event will be taking place on March 14 in Ag Sci 219. Two presentations will be given by HNFAS, continuing the Spring 2016 series theme of Food Security. As always, lunch will be provided for those who are there, and video conferencing will be available for those tuning in remotely—just email Candice at cmil@hawaii.edu for more information. Be there or be insecure!

Fill in the GAPs

2/18/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Jari SuganoO‘ahu Cooperative Extension agents Jari Sugano (pictured) and Jensen Uyeda will be providing an update on Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs) and the FDA’s Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) Produce Rule. They will provide a detailed overview of food safety programs that may affect local ag businesses in Hawai‘i. Before their presentations, Joy Gold of the Hawaii Agricultural Mediation Program (HIAMP) will begin by talking about how HIAMP can help resolve disagreements with complex federal programs over program eligibility and compliance. HIAMP helps farmers grow solutions to challenges that narrow financial margins or uncooperative weather can create with lenders and unsecured creditors, and insurance claims. Here are the dates and times: February 20, noon to 2 p.m., at Kapi‘olani Community College; February 23, 10 a.m. to noon, Waimanalo Research Station; March 1, 5–7 p.m., Kane‘ohe Extension Office; March 12, 10 a.m. to noon, Kahuku Community Center (this one’s still pending); and March 23, 10 a.m. to noon, HARC North Classroom. Reserve a seat for a session by emailing wahiawa@ctahr.hawaii.edu or calling (808) 622-4185. To find out more, email suganoj@ctahr.hawaii.edu or juyeda@hawaii.edu.

Fun at the Farm Fair

2/18/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


4-H kids at 2015 Farm FairThis year’s Farm Fair at Kualoa Ranch was the subject of a laudatory article in the December issue of Hana Hou, the magazine of Hawaiian Airlines. Much of the article, and its pictures, is devoted the 4-H livestock events. The UH Honeybee Project, and its bee-costumed student representatives, is also mentioned. Of these, and the many other agricultural educational events, the author comments, “Kids are definitely learning plenty all over today’s fair.” And that’s what the fun is all about!

Three Plus Two Equals Success

2/18/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Yong Li and Food Science MS studentsAfter two years of hard work, the first 3+2 Masters Program in CTAHR has enrolled international students. Two new students from China’s Hunan Agricultural University (HAU), Junhuang (Peter) Liu and Zhijun Zhan (middle and right), have arrived on campus and are eager to embark on a new academic journey at UH Manoa. These students, selected for their educational background and English proficiency, have completed three years of coursework in Food Science and Engineering at HAU and will spend their fourth and fifth years pursing master’s degrees in the Food Science MS program. Under the 3+2 program, during the next two years, the students will earn bachelor’s degrees from their home institution in China and master’s degrees from UH Manoa upon completion of their degree requirements. Many individuals at HAU and in CTAHR were instrumental in this significant milestone, including Yong Li (left), graduate chair of the Food Science MS program, HNFAS’s Ching Yuan Hu, the Food Science graduate faculty, and HNFAS chair Halina Zaleski, as well as Xiaoxin (Ivy) Mu of UHM’s Office of Graduate Education. This represents a major milestone in CTAHR’s goal to grow its graduate programs and become truly global. Also furthering those ends, the college is recruiting students for 3+2 programs that have been recently established with other international partner institutions.

Bioenergy in Germany

2/18/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Surendra KC in labSurendra KC (MBBE), a PhD student under Samir Khanal, has been awarded a highly competitive and prestigious German Academic Exchange (DAAD) Research fellowship to conduct research at the University of Hohenheim, Stuttgart, Germany, for a period of five months starting January 2016. Surendra will conduct anaerobic digestion studies of energy crops for bioenergy and bio-based products generation. This study aims to add new knowledge to the fundamental understanding of the digestion of energy crops. In addition, this research visit will also strengthen the research collaborations between UHM and the University of Hohenheim, to help UH establish a Tropical Anaerobic Digestion Research Program (TADRP). Surendra was also a recipient of UK Energy Research Centre (UKERC), London, UK fellowship in 2013 to attend the UKERC Summer School at University of Warwick, Coventry, UK. Go, Surendra!

Be the Boss of Your Money

2/18/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


TCYM money tree logoNeed to gain some financial savvy? Tune in to Take Charge of Your Money4, a special series of financial literacy videos broadcast on local television and embedded at the TCYM website to assist ordinary consumers improve their understanding and develop skills at effectively managing the family resources of their households. The Cooperative Extension Service, FCS, and UH’s Information Technology Services, Academic Technologies have collaborated with many local professionals to organize this sixteen-part series as a community service program. Each particular topic, such as investing or money-management tips for young adults, is covered by 4–6 shows created in one-hour slots for television viewing. You can watch all the shows on local television each semester on channels 354 or 355, watch all the shows on the website 24/7, view the PowerPoint presentations of all the speakers, view additional resources for each topic via website links, and test your knowledge of the content presented by participating on the Self-Test Quiz section of this website. Isn’t it time you took charge?

Who Judges the Livestock?

2/18/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


4-H livestock judging teamOne of the top honors a Hawai‘i 4-H livestock member can achieve is to earn a spot on the Hawaii State 4-H Livestock Judging team. This year’s team members were (left to right) Jacob Cabiles, Cullen Andrade, Kanani Kaaekuahiwi, and Terri Connors, who braved the freezing weather in Denver, Colorado, for a chance to learn, show their skills, and have fun. Jacob’s from O‘ahu; the rest are from the Big Island. After competing at the State 4-H livestock judging contest on O‘ahu, these four top contestants won bragging rights to represent Hawai‘i at the National Western Stockshow’s junior livestock judging contest. The contest is a part of the 96th Annual Western National Roundup, the second-longest-running National 4-H event, drawing nearly 1,000 delegates from 31 state and Alberta, Canada. The delegates engaged in educational programs, opportunities in leadership and citizenship skill development, and youth exchange activities and were exposed to a multitude of national contests. In addition to the Roundup event, the team members got to hone their judging skills prior to the contest at the University of Wyoming Laramie Research and Extension Center and at Colorado State University’s B.W. Pickett Equine Center. They also participated in one of the nation’s top quality youth livestock judging contests and enjoyed the livestock

Spreading Like…Wildfire

2/18/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Wildland fire in HawaiiThe work Clay Trauernicht and Creighton Litton (both NREM) have been doing to quantify the effects of wildfire in Hawai‘i has received some good coverage in Hawaii News Now, Hawaii Public Radio, and the Star-Advertiser. Clay and Creighton show not only that wildfires are a serious problem in the Islands, burning approximately the same percentage of land area every year as in the western United States, but that unlike on the Mainland, here wildland fires are overwhelmingly caused by human activities. The good news? That means we’ve got more power to reduce their number and severity. The old saying from Smokey the Bear is even more true in Hawai‘i—so get out and prevent some forest (and grassland) fires!

Extending a Helping Hand With Funding

2/18/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Kelvin Sewake and donorsInterim Associate Dean for Extension Kelvin Sewake addressed his vision for agriculture as the invited keynote speaker at the 68th HFNA/HFSA Shinnenkai on January 9 at the Hilo Hawaiian Hotel. It was announced at the meeting that he had established a UH Foundation Discretionary Account for Extension, to provide the Associate Dean of Extension with funds for Extension-related activities such as workshops, conferences, supplies, training, fees, equipment, travel, awards, honorarium, etc. This account will be especially useful for expenditures that are not covered by grants and will allow for Extension professional improvement, to conduct educational programs for our industry and communities, and to recognize Extension faculty for their accomplishments. A total of $5,000 was donated by (left to right) Hawaii Tropical Flower Council, represented by Thong Teng Neo; Hawaii Floriculture and Nursery Association and Greenpoint Nurseries, represented by Eric Tanouye; Kelvin Sewake; Big Island Plant & Foliage, represented by Dalen Kawakami; and Kohala Nursery, represented by Dawn Kitagawa. Kelvin established the account using $1,000 of his personal funds and expressed appreciation to the other donors for the generous help that will go towards enhancing CTAHR’s Extension programs. Anyone interested in donating to the fund can contact Kelvin.

How Much Does Sending Money Home Cost?

2/18/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Person at Western UnionJenjira Yahirun (COF) and her colleague Eliva Ambugo have a new publication in Demographic Research: “Remittances and Risk of Major Depressive Episode and Sadness Among New Legal Immigrants to the United States.” Their research found that new immigrants to the US were at higher risk of a major depressive episode if they sent money back home (“remittances”), versus those who didn’t, perhaps because of the associated financial stress this caused. This was particularly true of those who were refugees/asylum seekers, as opposed to employment-seeking migrants. This analysis of a large national dataset illuminates the intersection of mental health, economic stability, and family ties.

One Stomach or Two?

2/17/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Brian Kerr with graphic of human gastric systemWant to know more about pigs’ digestion? You won’t want to miss Brian J. Kerr’s seminar entitled “Research by a Monogastric Nutritionist” on Friday, February 19, at 3:30 p.m. in Ag Sci 220. Before becoming the research leader/lead scientist at the USDA-ARS Swine Research Unit in Ames, Iowa, in 2001, Dr. Kerr worked in several capacities in industry and in the public sector. His research focuses on improving nutrient utilization in non-ruminant animals in an effort to reduce impact on the environment, including gas emissions. He is a reviewer for several scientific journals and was involved in revising the Nutrient Requirements of Swine. He has published widely and is an active speaker in professional and industry meetings, both nationally and internationally. For more information, please contact Rajesh Jha at rjha@hawaii.edu.

Food Futures

2/17/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Mark BittmanWant to know what and how you might be eating in the future? Mark Bittman will be presenting a talk, “The Future of Food,” on Thursday, February 18, at 6:00 pm at the Architecture Auditorium. CTAHR is co-sponsoring Mr. Bittman, who is a former food columnist for the New York Times and a Fellow with the Food and Environment Program at the Union of Concerned Scientists. He argues for tactical veganism, more home cooking, and more government intervention into what he sees as a struggling food system but offers a message of hope for Hawai‘i and beyond.

Get the Link, Lose the Rot

2/17/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Cacao pod affected by black pod rotJust as black rot can ruin a harvest, a bad link can ruin a presentation! If you’re looking forward to tuning in to Scot Nelson’s (PEPS) YouTube presentation on black pod rot of cacao at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, February 18, make sure you’re clicking on the right link! The one previously posted won’t work. And remember, you’ll be able to ask Scot questions during the presentation at the YouTube site link or via Skype at scot.nelson5 (make sure you send Scot a request to add you as a contact).

Love Is in Bloom

2/10/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Heart made out of rosesThere’s a reason flowers are classic Valentine’s Day gifts: they’re beautiful, they smell lovely, and they’re oh-so-romantic. Participate in a classic tradition by heading over to the Valentine’s Day Plant Sale put on by the Horticulture Society to pick up a delightful flowering plant for your beloved. It’s all happening on Friday, February 12, in St. John 10B; the tireless Hort Club members will be there to hook you up from 9 a.m. to whenever they run out of their wares. If you need another reason, which you probably don’t, all proceeds support the UH Horticulture Society and their annual field trip spent volunteering with horticultural producers throughout the state.

Get Some Sugar for Your Sugar

2/10/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Pre-Vet Club ValentineWhat’s better than a bake sale? A Valentine’s Day-themed bake sale! What’s better than a Valentine’s Day-themed bake sale? A Valentine’s Day-themed bake sale that supports a good cause! You’re in luck, because that’s what will be taking place on Friday, February 12, from 12:15 to 3:15 p.m. in the Campus Center. What’s the good cause, you ask? All proceeds support the Pre-Vet Club. So do it for your sweet tooth—do it for your sweetie—do it for the puppies and kittens—do it for the hardworking students—just head on down to the bake sale!

Love Takes Wing

2/10/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Akohekohe honeycreeper plush toyShow your love s/he’s as unique and special as a rare, endangered honeycreeper! If you haven’t yet gotten your sweetheart a stuffed ‘akohekohe (Maui crested honeycreeper) plush toy, check out the NREM GSO’s flyer about these life-like charmers and prepare to be convinced! Their sale helps benefit the NREM GSO and the Maui Forest Bird Recovery Project. They’re only $15 (cash only), so get one before they fly away!

January



Step Right Up—to Fun

1/26/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Spring Event 2016Life’s a carnival…so act like it at CTAHR’s Spring Event, which will be held on Friday, February 5, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. in the grassy area next to Gilmore Hall. There will be great refreshments, carnival games with prizes, a caricature artist, and more…all just for the price of your smiling face! Come by and grab some popcorn, and remember—all is Fair!




A Look Into the Future

1/21/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Mark BittmanFormer New York Times food writer Mark Bittman, author of the How to Cook Everything Cookbook series and Vegan before 6, will be speaking on “The Future of Food” at UH Manoa’s Architecture Auditorium on Thursday, February 18, at 6:00 p.m. The event is free. Mr. Bittman recently left the New York Times to establish his own organization, The Purple Carrot, which sells ready-to-cook vegan meals delivered directly to the home. His talk is co-sponsored by CTAHR and should be very enlightening.

Glad to Have Them: January 2016

1/13/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Skip Bittenbender with cacao treesA number of members of the CTAHR ‘ohana are celebrating important milestones in service: Skip Bittenbender (TPSS, pictured), king of kava and cacao, has been working his magic with fruit and beverage crops for 30 years. Four others have reached the all-important decade mark: Soojin Jun (HNFAS), most recently lauded for his supercooling technology that keeps food fresh without freezing; Mark Kubo, an agricultural research technician at the Maui Agricultural Research Station in Kula; Priscilla Roque, office manager of the Kamuela Extension Office on the Big Island, who keeps everything running smoothly; and Sarah Yuan (COF), whose work focusing on Hawai‘i’s homeless and aging populations has brought her acclaim. CTAHR’s all the better for their smarts, talents, and hard work!

What They Eat When They’re on Their Own

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Jinan BannaIn collaboration with a multi-state team of researchers, Jinan Banna (HNFAS) has published a paper entitled “Influence of parenting practices on eating behaviors of early adolescents during independent eating occasions: implications for obesity prevention” in the journal Nutrients. Early adolescents consume foods and beverages during eating occasions that occur with and without parental supervision, it explains. Parents may influence eating behaviors of early adolescents during eating occasions when they are present or during independent eating occasions by engaging in practices that affect availability of foods and beverages, and through perceived normative beliefs and expectations for intake. The article describes the influence of parenting practices on eating behaviors in general and when specifically applied to independent eating occasions of early adolescents. This information may be used to inform parenting interventions targeting obesity prevention among early adolescents focusing on independent eating occasions.

What to Eat and How to Eat It

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Maria StewartMaria Stewart (HNFAS) has been making some important nutrition pronouncements lately. She is quoted in a recent KHON news story on the World Health Organization’s pronouncement that processed meats cause colon cancer. She provides a note of moderation, emphasizing that meat still does offer many health benefits, including vitamins and minerals like zinc, and that it’s fine to cut down on meat without giving it up entirely. Her other recent pronouncement is much weightier: she was invited to co-author the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Position Paper on the Health Implications of Dietary Fiber. This evidence-based position paper represents the view of the Academy and will be a resource for health professionals and researchers. It’s a big honor to be asked to speak for this august body of nutrition scholars...and Maria is just the right person to do it.

Ears Over the Years

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Corn at Waimanalo StationAn extensive review of 50 years of corn breeding at CTAHR has been published recently. Entitled “Breeding Tropical Vegetable Corns,” it was written by James Brewbaker and Aussie colleague Ian Martin for the journal Plant Breeding Reviews 39:125-198. Dr B writes with admiration of the contributions of many of his 52 PhD and MS graduates working on the genetics and improvement of corn. Best known locally for supersweet “Kahuku-corns,” CTAHR research has focused on creating high tolerance to pests, diseases, and stresses unique to the tropics. A set of 1200 different varieties bred here is stored in CTAHR’s Hawaii Foundation Seeds center and runs the gamut from supersweet to mochi to popcorn to silage. The authors remind readers that the most common vegetable corn in the tropics is still “field corn,” with number 2 being the mochi (waxy) corn common in Asia. But “Hawaiian Supersweets” are rapidly gaining ground, notably in Southeast Asia, where ice cream and supersweet-corn milk are favored products.

Secrets of Pineapple Unlocked!

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Bob Paull and Nancy ChenNancy Chen and Robert Paull (both TPSS) were part of the international team that has sequenced the genes in the pineapple genome. Their role was in the characterization of the genes involved in sugar and cell-wall metabolism, and they were previously involved in the international sequencing efforts for papaya, Asian pear, and sacred lotus. The pineapple team was led by a graduate of TPSS, Dr. Ray Ming, now a professor at the University of Illinois, whose major advisor in TPSS was James Brewbaker. The paper reporting the results of this international sequencing effort appeared in the latest on-line issue of Nature Genetics. Pineapple has unique traits that have made it a subject of much research: it has an alternate photosynthetic pathway that concentrates carbon dioxide during the night when water loss is less, leading to high water-use efficiency. The plant also has a unique flower induction method, which means that plants can be made to flower throughout the year. The species is also of scientific interest as a reference for the evolution of genes in grasses.

To Label or Not to Label?

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Broccoli labeled GMO FreeThe latest Biotech in Focus newsletter discusses the controversy surrounding mandatory and voluntary labeling of foods and other products containing GMOs. It points out that the majority of Americans surveyed are in favor of labeling, but it also argues that such labeling may keep consumers from buying GM foods if they consider them to be less safe, and that for places like Hawai‘i such laws might keep certain manufacturers from shipping to the state. "Questions of whether and how GM foods might be labeled in the United States," concludes the author, "are far from being resolved." Check out this and previous newsletters at the Biotech in Focus website.

UH Mag-nificent

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Dean Gallo in UH MagazineThe latest UH Magazine has CTAHR written all over it. Dean Gallo and Sarah Yuan (COF) are two of the experts consulted for the issue’s “Hawai‘i Wants to Know” article, offering their insights into the possibility of the Islands’ food sustainability and the demographics of the state’s homeless population, respectively. The GoFarm program is represented by an item on one of its alumni, Rob Barreca. And there’s also a CTAHR ad featuring six students or recent alumni!

A Lush Book for Dry Climes

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Rangoon CreeperFormer CTAHR horticulture professor Fred Rauch is co-author, along with Paul Weissich, of a new book on xeriscape landscaping in the tropics from UH Press. The book, Plants for the Tropical Xeriscape: A Gardener’s Guide, is reviewed by fellow former professor and alumna Heidi Bornhorst in the Star-Advertiser. Her enthusiastic review especially commends the wealth of helpful and beautiful pictures in the book and its discussion of rare or under-used plants, like the Rangoon creeper (pictured). The book has also checked all the plants listed for weediness or invasive characteristics. It sounds like a book that belongs on the local gardener’s bookshelf!

Diet for an Island Community

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


2015 class of UH CTAHR dietetic internsCTAHR welcomes its third class of dietetic interns! The UH CTAHR Dietetic Internship provides graduates of a didactic program in Dietetics with an opportunity to increase their knowledge of food and nutrition science and to acquire competencies needed to practice dietetics in a variety of settings including clinical, food service, and community. It is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics of the National Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, requires 1200 hours of experience, and qualifies graduates to take the Registered Dietitian's Exam. The internship, which focuses on Hawai’i’s unique community, promotes education of students in the multicultural environment, service in a variety of community settings, and participation in various professional organizations. Pictured are lecturer Amy Tousman (left), internship director Ann Ditzler (right), and the 2015 Dietetic Intern Class: Leah Tamura, Isaiah Mar, Kasey Kawamoto, Sandi Kim, and Maile Ishikawa (left to right).

Passion for Fashion in Santa Fe

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Gabrielle Sanehira with two awardsThree garments and a research project produced by four FDM alumnae were presented at the 2015 International Textile and Apparel Association (ITAA) Conference in Santa Fe. ITAA is the biggest international textile and apparel professional association. This year, 123 undergraduate designs from international and national fashion universities were submitted, and just over a quarter were accepted and presented. Gabrielle Sanehira (pictured) had two garments in the ITAA Design Exhibition. She won the ATEXINC Award for Excellence in Marketable Textile Design for her “Collected, Cut and Recreated Dress,” an eco-friendly dress made out of recycled American Spirit cigarette boxes. She also won second place for the Cotton Incorporated Innovations in Cotton Design Award for her “Ortho-Litho Film” garment, which employed traditional analog photography and chemistry technology with ortho-litho film. Ayaka Hosomi’s garment “Legacy: The Past to the Present and Men to Women” was also presented in the ITAA Design Exhibit, and Su Lun Guth and Caitlen Schmidt’s research project entitled “Omni-Channel Purchase Journey With Multi-Device Paths” was presented in the ITAA Research Presentation session. Congratulations to all for their great achievements, including their professor, Ju-Young Kang! Professor Andrew Reilly also served as the ITAA’s vice president of scholarship.

A Ringing Endorsement of Moringa

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


MoringaCTAHR represented Hawai‘i at the symposium “Moringa oleifera: A Decade of Advances in Research and Development” held in Manila, Philippines, from November 15 to18. This first international symposium on the important multipurpose tree brought together 300 scientists from the international community. Ted Radovich (TPSS), Russell Nagata (O‘ahu county), John McHugh (DuPonte Pioneer), Glenn Teves (TPSS), Amjad Ahmad (TPSS), and Robert Paull (TPSS) gave an invited talk, “Germplasm evaluation and selection of Moringa oleifera in Hawai‘i,” one of over 100 presentations focusing on the horticulture, processing, and use of the tree. And if you don’t have any moringa, or kalamungay, in your own yard, consider planting one of these graceful trees—they’re lovely and very useful!

Much-Deserved Recognition

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Richard Criley with plumeriaIn a recent newsletter, the American Society for Horticultural Science recognized TPSS faculty members who have been dedicated and valued members of ASHS for 25 years or more: Richard Criley (pictured, with plumeria), Robert Paull, Kent Kobayashi, Joe DeFrank, “Skip” Bittenbender, Ken Leonhardt, and Susan Miyasaka. All these faculty members deserve a big mahalo for setting a standard for aspiring horticulturists in TPSS. In the same newsletter, TPSS master’s student Tiare Silvasy was honorably welcomed as a new ASHS member. Way to go, CTAHR and TPSS!

Down With Downy Mildew!

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


CTAHR basil field dayKeeping basil healthy is a continuing problem for growers, but CTAHR’s on the job. O‘ahu CES has been working with Janice Uchida, Mike Kawate, Miaoying Tian, Chris Kadooka, Julie Coughlin, and James Kam (all PEPS), as well as Hawai‘i’s IR-4 Program and agricultural chemical companies on O‘ahu, to develop solutions to manage basil downy mildew (BDM) and a new pathogen that’s believed to be Stemphylium vesicarium. CTAHR conducted replicated field trials that show that a rotation of crop-protection chemicals such as Quadris, Fosphite, Trilogy (O), and Regalia (O) can minimize BDM. Other CTAHR research trials, as well as a review of literature and growers’ testimonials, suggest that control of Stemphylium pre-harvest is extremely difficult with the current list of products registered for use on basil in Hawai‘i and that using irradiation as a post-harvest tool has potential. See the recent Impact story on CTAHR and basil as well!

Illustrious Alums

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


CTAHR alumniCTAHR was recently highlighted at the Inaugural Chancellor’s Alumni Thought Leaders Spotlight hosted at College Hill by the UH Foundation. Manoa Chancellor Robert Bley-Vroman began the festivities by proclaiming, “Tonight we celebrate the achievements and knowledge of our invited alumni in the food and farming sectors. UH Manoa has a long and proud history of food and farming innovations, partnering with our staff, students and alumni. For over 100 years, the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources (CTAHR), has been at the forefront of agriculture.” CTAHR alumni pictured here with Chancellor Bley-Vroman and Dean Gallo include Interim Associate Dean for Extension Kelvin Sewake, Fred Lau of Mari’s Garden, landscaping consultant Heidi Bornhorst, former Associate Dean for Extension Barry Brennan, and Diane Ragone, director of the Breadfruit Institute and 2015 CTAHR Outstanding Alumna.

The Navy vs. the Mosquito

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Liza GerardoPEPS alumna Liza Gerardo, now an officer in the Navy, was recently featured on KHON2 news to discuss the Navy’s role in helping to combat the spread of dengue fever in the Islands. Liza completed an MS in Entomology with Helen Spafford and is using her degree in her position in the Navy Environmental and Preventive Medicine Unit, surveying the mosquito species that are in Hawai‘i by means of light and odor traps. She offers these tips to keep mosquitoes away: drain any standing water from pet bowls or plant pots, throw away trash and other containers that may catch water, make sure screens are present and undamaged, keep grass short and hedges trimmed, and use DEET or other insect repellents when outside.

Celebrating a Milestone

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


CTAHR winter 2015 ConvocationApproximately 200 CTAHR students and their families and friends, along with CTAHR faculty and staff, attended CTAHR’s Fall 2015 Convocation. This celebration, co-emceed by Lisa Kitagawa-Akagi and Irene Morrow, began with congratulatory remarks from Dean Maria Gallo and CTAHR Alumni Association and Friends President Kauahi Perez. The Fall 2015 student marshals, Marie-Guillen Guillermo and Lena Phomsouvanh (both FAMR), selected for their academic achievements, leadership, and service to CTAHR and the university, were then recognized. Afterwards, graduating students active in CTAHR-affiliated student organizations were acknowledged for their participation. The ceremony concluded with the individual recognition of 25 graduates, followed by refreshments and mingling. Congratulations to the graduating students for achieving such a milestone! Good luck in your future endeavors! A big mahalo goes to all who supported the students: to SAPFB for partially funding the event, CTAHR Alumni Association and Friends and UH Alumni Association for support and promotional items given to graduating students, Steven and Karen Sato for donating lei, CTAHR scholarship recipients and student ambassadors for volunteering at the event, and ASAO for providing CTAHR memorabilia for the graduates and organizing this event.

What to Do With Wild Horses

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Wild horsesDan Rubinoff (PEPS) and Christopher Lepczyk (formerly of NREM, now at Auburn University) have published an op-ed in Slate on wild horses that was the third most shared piece. The authors argue that despite the public perception of the “wild”—actually feral—horses of the west as symbols of the beauty of untamed nature, these horses are actually introduced and invasive species that are degrading and destroying the true native species of their habitats and should be controlled. The article is certainly getting readers thinking and talking!

How to Be a Tree

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Person with tree rootsRetired Extension agent Norm Bezona suggests in his most recent column for the Hawaii Tribune-Herald that in order to appreciate our deep kinship and interdependence with trees, readers should attempt to “be a tree”: to think like one of these tall growing creatures and thus, hopefully, treat them better. For instance, when preparing to prune a tree, Norm reminds us to think about the last time we got a haircut: “The barber was not supposed to cut off your head, just trim your hair” (!). In other words, don’t prune too drastically. Find out more ways to be a tree here! It’s a great exercise.

Nalo Mele

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Ted Radovich and Ken LeonhardtTed Radovich and Ken Leonhardt, specialists at the Waimanalo Research Station, represented CTAHR’s holiday spirit in fine style at the Waimanalo Christmas Parade, driving in a “certified-organic” tractor loaded with gifts and an antique Ford that reminded onlookers how long CTAHR’s been making life better for the community.

Got a Problem? Engineer a Solution!

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


BE students at presentationDan Jenkins’s (MBBE) class BE 420, Sensors and Instrumentation for Biological Systems, presented some novel solutions to agricultural issues at their end-of-semester showcase. Projects included a water-based self-servicing mosquito trap, an automated coffee cherry sorter, a field-friendly cartridge for concentrating bacteria in samples, and wireless systems for controlling and acquiring data using BE lab equipment. For each project, students researched the problem, assembled prototypes, discussed manufacturing costs, created the instrument, and then finally presented it to an admiring audience. Now we’re just waiting for these handy devices to go into production!

Up in Gilmore

1/5/2016  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR


Andy Hashimoto with Rochelle Hashimoto and Dean Gallo at portrait unveilingFormer Dean Andy Hashimoto was honored at his recent portrait unveiling. His portrait is now hanging proudly on the wall amongst other past deans on the second floor of Gilmore Hall. Andy served as dean from 2000 to 2010 before returning to his position as professor in MBBE and director for the Western Insular Pacific Sun Grant Subcenter, tasked with researching feedstocks for biofuels to reduce the Islands’ dependency on imported fossil fuels.