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Food Science and Human Nutrition 452
Concepts in Nutrition Education

Fall 2012 - Spring 2013
Spring, 2011
Spring, 2010
Spring, 2009
Spring, 2008
Spring, 2007
Spring, 2006
Spring, 2005
Spring, 2004
Spring, 2003
Spring, 2002

 

 

 

 

 

 

FSHN 451/452: Concepts in Nutrition Education
Fall 2012 - Spring, 2013

Intro will go here...

 

FSHN 452: Concepts in Nutrition Education
Food Deserts in Hawai‘i Website
Spring, 2011

The students in FSHN 452 formed four working groups each focused on historical and current information on food deserts.  This semester’s informational website was created primarily for professionals, paraprofessionals, and staff of community agencies and other entities in Hawaii who deal with populations in potential food deserts. 

The term 'food desert' has a variety of definitions.  The working definition of food desert for the Spring 2011 FSHN 452 class was: An area in the US with limited access to affordable and nutritious food, particularly such an area composed of predominantly lower income neighborhoods and communities (2008 U.S. Farm Bill, as mentioned in Ver Ploeg M., et al., 2009)

Each group compiled a comprehensive list, summaries, and annotations on food deserts from the following four sources:

  • 2009 USDA Report

  • Research and Review Articles in Peer-Reviewed Journals

  • Institute of Medicine Report & Other Government Documents

  • Public Media (websites, government, and non-government media, magazines, blogs, news, and journals)

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FSHN 452: Concepts in Nutrition Education
Defining and Investigating Possible Food Deserts in Hawaii
Spring, 2010

The term 'food desert' has a variety of definitions.  Before developing a website on food deserts in Hawaii (potential class project for Spring 2011), the students in FSHN 452 used a definition, slightly modified from more formal ones, which allowed each of four working groups to focus on a different situation, and which included elements of food insecurity. The working definition used was: "any area and/or situation that prevents an individual or group of individuals from obtaining a culturally-acceptable, nutritious, affordable, and safe supply of food."

Each group investigated a possible food desert in Hawaii. Two historical situations were investigated (the Island of Kauai after Hurricane Iniki, 1992; and closing of the Waianae/Oahu Save-A-Lot supermarket in 2002) and two current situations were investigated (closing of Moiliili/Oahu Star Market in 2010; and food selection at University of Hawaii at Manoa Hale Aloha Cafeteria, 2010). In-depth investigations, including personal interviews using student-developed/tested questionnaires and interview scripts, searching news-media archives, and outreach to organizations involved led the students to conclude:

  • On Kauai, the preparedness of the individual played a large role in whether that person experienced a food desert or not. Enough food mattered; culturally-acceptability, nutritional quality, affordability, and safety were of lesser concern in times of disaster (1992).

  • In Waianae, some residents were aware of the supermarket closing, but they had alternative, appropriate food retail outlets and transportation to and from the area (2002).

  • In Moiliili, some senior residents were negatively affected due to transportation, affordability, and quality of food issues; thus a partial, temporary problem exists (2010).

  • At Hale Aloha Cafeteria, the food available was determined to be nutritious and affordable, but 'true availability' would be dependent on the financial situation of the individual student (2010).

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FSHN 452: Concepts in Nutrition Education
Upstream Interventions for Youth and Other Groups
Spring, 2009

The goal of this class was to create upstream interventions targeting youth and another group of people with whom they would commonly interact.  The upstream intergenerational interventions focused on positively affecting food environments through the influential support of grandparents, parents, teachers, older youth, or younger children.  Each group targeted youth through increasing variety of fruits and veggies in the following five groups:

  • Youth and Grandparents – Introducing youth (11-14 years old) and grandparents to a variety of locally available fruits and veggies through an intergenerational game. 
  • Youth and Other Youth – Introducing new fruits and veggies using a 2-week module demonstrating color groups in after school programs for younger youth (11-13 years old) and older youth (16-18 years old).
  • Youth and Parents – Introducing children and parents to a variety of fruits and vegetables through a card game.
  • Youth and Teachers – Encouraging variety in new and interesting food choices through classroom-based programs involving youth (12-13 years old) and their teachers.
  • Youth and Younger Children – Encouraging new foods and variety for young children (4th and 5th graders) and older youth (11th and 12th graders) through a supermarket scavenger hunt.
  1. Youth and Grandparents
  2. Youth and Other Youth
  3. Youth and Parents
  4. Youth and Teachers
  5. Youth and Younger Kids

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FSHN 452: Concepts in Nutrition Education
Nutrition Information for Food Preparers and Donors
Spring, 2008

Individuals have a variety of eating styles and habits. The common goal of this semester's groups was to utilize "upstream" messages to enhance eating behaviors and improve mealtime practices. Eating patterns and food environments of each student was self-reported to determine the following four groups.

  • Eating Alone - A cookbook for individuals eating alone was created to avoid cooking in large amounts, and using the same ingredient in multiple dishes.
  • Eating As A Family - A calendar for families was created in order to promote variety and balance as well as un facts and activities for families to do.
  • Eating With A Significant Other - Consuming balanced meals using a variety of foods was the theme used throughout a newsletter designed for young couples. This newsletter also included recipes made-for-two as well as ideas for fun activities.
  • Eating With Roommates - A 12-month calendar was created for sharing and preparing meals with another person, and also included information on farmer's markets.

Projects:

  1. Eating Alone
  2. Eating As A Family
  3. Eating With A Significant Other
  4. Eating With Roommates

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FSHN 452: Concepts in Nutrition Education
Nutrition Information for Food Preparers and Donors
Spring, 2007

Benefit the food insecure by providing nutrition information to those that are involved int he preparation and donation of food and meals at local agencies. Four groups developed educational materials based on the Produce A Plate concept.

  • Organizational Food Donors — Targeted food donor organizations such as food banks, food pantries, or religious groups that donate food.
  • Individucal Food Donors — Aimed to educate individual food donors through grocery stores.
  • Food servers and Deliverers — Targeted servers and deliverers for the food insecure.
  • Food Preparers — Focused on creating nutrition education materials for food servers and preparers of organizations that prepare food.

Projects:

  1. Organizational Food Donors
  2. Individual Food Donors
  3. Food Servers and Deliverers
  4. Food Preparers

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FSHN 452: Concepts in Nutrition Education
Special Needs Groups
Spring 2006

The focus of the spring 2006 semester-long projects was to serve individuals with special needs on the island of Oahu. The goal was to develop educational materials and experiences based on the Produce A Plate concept, increasing awareness of the importance of eating an appropriately proportioned and balanced diet. The three groups geared their efforts towards programs evaluated the previous semester in the FSHN 451 Community Nutrition class: Special Olympians, families of people with type 2 diabetes, and mentally disabled adults on the Waianae Coast.

Projects:

  1. Diabetes Group - A Great Plate in 3 Easy Steps
  2. Special Olympics Group - Eat Like an Athlete: A Project for Special Olympics Athletes
  3. Waianae Coast Group - "Producing A Plate" with Huki Like Kakou!

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FSHN 452: Concepts in Nutrition Education
Produce An Athlete Website Revision
Spring, 2005

The spring 2005 class semester-long project was modifying and updating a website created by the former FSHN 452 class in the spring semester of 2002. The original website, "Produce an Athlete," targeted athletes, parents, and coaches in Hawaii, encouraging the consumption of fruits and vegetables. The goal of the 2005 project was to revamp the three-year-old website, encouraging an increase in consumption of fruits and vegetables. The objective of this class included remodeling of the existing materials, marketing the site to youth sports and health-related organizations, and creating interactive games for youth.

Projects:

  1. "Produce an Athlete" Website: The Games & Survey Group
  2. Remodeling Group
  3. "Marketing Munchkins"

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FSHN 452: Concepts in Nutrition Education
Community Education Program
Spring, 2004

The goal for the FSHN 452 spring 2004 project was designing a community education program for EFNEP schools using the following criteria:

  • Target adolescents age 12-18 years old, in the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP), which is designed to assist audiences with limited resources in acquiring knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors necessary for nutritionally sound diets, in addition to improving the entire family's diet and nuritional well-being;
  • Organize the project using a modular delivery;
  • Use Social Marketing and Stages of Change models;
  • Deliver three messages regarding the importance of calcium food safety, and fruit and vegetable consumption.

Three groups were responsible for carrying out these educational programs and focused on fruits and vegetables, high calcium foods, and food safety.

Projects:

  1. Hand Washing: First Line of Defense
  2. Easy Way to 5-A-Day
  3. Calcium Group

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FSHN 452: Concepts in Nutrition Education
Food Safety Interventions
Spring, 2003

The objective of the Spring 2003 project was to design and implement a successful food safety message and materials to the elderly in order to reduce the susceptibility of food borne illness. Elderly clients of home-delivered meals programs; the servers, drivers, and packers of the meals; and clients from congregate dining sites were included as their target audience.

Projects:

  1. Keep hot foods hot, cold foods cold.
  2. When in doubt, throw it out.
  3. Wash hands quick, no get sick.

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FSHN 452: Concepts in Nutrition Education
Produce An Athlete Website
Spring, 2002

The Spring 2002 project was to create a website promoting healthful eating for active children, their parents, and coaches residing in Hawaii. The long-term goal of this website is to increase consumption of fruits and vegetables, primarily in children. Information such as recipes, activities, food tips, and other nutrition links are included on this website.

<Produce An Athlete>

Projects:

  1. Website Construction
  2. Content
  3. Advertising/Evaluation

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Contact Information

Engaged Instruction
1955 East-West Road #306
Honolulu, Hawaii 96822
Phone: (808) 956-4124
Fax: (808) 956-6457z
Email: new@ctahr.hawaii.edu

 
 
   


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