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Hinupuaa

Hinupuaa
Other Names: Manini

General Characteristics: Medium in height to tall, slender, moderately spreading, maturing within 15 to 18 months, producing from 2 to 5 oha; readily identified by profuse light and dark green petiole stripes and light pinkish edge.

Petiole: 70 to 100 cm. long, light and dark green-striped throughout length of petiole, the dark stripes predominating, slightly tinged with purple on upper half, purplish at apex, white to greenish-white at base, light pinkish at edge.

Leaf blade: 35 to 60 cm. long, 30 to 40 cm. wide, 30 to 45 cm. from tip to base of sinus, sagittate, thin in texture, slightly mottled dark and light green with bluish cast; margins slightly undulate; piko purple; lobes acute with narrow sinus.

Corm: Flesh white with yellowish fibers; skin white to cream-colored.

Inflorescence: Peduncle green-and white-striped; spathe about 24 cm. long, the lower tubular portion 4 to 5 cm. long, green-and white-striped, the upper yellow, tightly rolled or sometimes open near constriction; spadix 8 cm. long, the sterile appendage 7 mm. long.

Origin, and derivation of name: Native variety; the name Hinupuaa is literally translated "pig grease," and may have referred to the glossy appearance of the petiole or the slippery texture of the cooked corm.

Distribution: Limited; usually grown under upland culture.

Use: Mainly as a table taro.