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2013


December



Non-Timber Forest Products

12/18/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Western GhatsNREM’s Jyotsna Krishnakumar will present her PhD dissertation, “An Assessment of Non-timber Forest Products Certification in Western Ghats, Kerala-A Multi-stakeholder Study,” Monday, January 6, 3 p.m. in Sherman Lab 103. The goal of this study is to assess the potential socio-economic impact of non-timber forest product certification in Kerala, focusing on one of its five indigenous communities—the Kadars, categorized as a particularly vulnerable tribal group by the Government of India.

Dr. B, Video Star

12/18/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Dr. BCan’t get enough of Dr.B? There’s a video for that! Dr.B is featured on the UH homepage in a video highlighting his lifetime of work in plant breeding and corn genetics as well as his recent $1 million endowment for graduate students. Go, Dr. B!

Nalo Kalikimaka 2013

12/18/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

CTAHR at the Waimanalo ParadeNothing says Christmas like CTAHR! Ken Leonhardt and Ted Radovich (both TPSS) organized a colorful and festive CTAHR entry for the Waimanalo Christmas Parade on December 14. A venerable Model-T Ford decorated with flowers developed by CTAHR led the way, as helpful volunteers tossed candy to the crowd. Next were the tractor and trailer, laden with taro, tropical flowers, and other crops representative of CTAHR, borrowed from several generous Waimanalo nurseries. There was even a decorated Norfolk pine in the tractor bucket! Community outreach, good fun, and Christmas spirit—what could be better?

Travel Pono

12/18/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Alexis Anjomshoaa and Linda CoxAlexis Anjomshoaa, NREM graduate student, and her advisor, Linda Cox (also NREM), are working with the Hawai‘i Ecotourism Association to kick off their new Protect Hawai‘i–Travel Pono campaign. This effort involves community outreach and an improved Sustainable Tourism Certification Program. The Hawai‘i Ecotourism Association works to protect Hawai‘i’s environment and culture through the promotion of responsible travel and educational programs aimed at the public and the visitor industry relating to ecotourism issues.

Mmmmmm, Honey

12/18/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Busy making honeyCTAHR is buzzing! CTAHR staff had a chance to help with the winter honey harvest from Waimanalo Research Station and the Urban Garden Center in Pearl City on Tuesday, December 10. Participants learned how to cut away the wax, spin a centrifuge to extract the honey, test for water level, and strain and bottle the honey from members of the UH Honeybee Project. Check out photos from the event. Oh, the sweetness of success!

Convocation Congratulations

12/18/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Fall 2013 ConvocationA big congratulations to the students honored at the CTAHR Convocation on Thursday, December 12. More than 150 students, their families and friends, and CTAHR faculty and staff attended this celebration of this semester’s 28 graduates. The event was emceed by Lisa Kitagawa-Akagi, with congratulatory remarks from Dean Maria Gallo and CTAHR Alumni Association and Friends President Dr. Susan Miller. Student marshals Marissa Chee (NREM) and Jasmine Pang (FAMR) were honored for their academic achievements, leadership and service, and graduates were acknowledged for their participation in CTAHR-affiliated organizations. Thank you to SAPFB for partially funding this event, the CTAHR Alumni Association and Friends for their support, Steven and Karen Sato for donating lei, CTAHR scholarship recipients and student ambassadors for volunteering at the event, and ASAO for organizing the event and providing the CTAHR memorabilia presented to the graduates. Congratulations, graduates! Good luck in your future endeavors!

The Art of Fish

12/18/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Benny Ron and gyotaku artistsIn conjunction with the Honolulu Marathon, HNFAS’s Benny Ron conducted a gyotaku (fish printing) workshop for Honolulu Marathon Clinic runners to increase awareness of aquaculture, seafood, and food security in Hawai‘i. While runners and their families applied the art of gyotaku to T-shirts, they learned the importance of fish to our health and local culture and economy. It was a fun opportunity to combine art with food and aquaculture. Hooray for fish!

Campaign for Costumes

12/18/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Dr. Lin and a student with a kimonoReminder! FDM’s Historic Costume Collection crowdfunding campaign has hit $1,000! The campaign hopes to raise $10,000 to support conservation and display of the collection’s historically and culturally irreplaceable items. Find out about how you can support this unique and awesome collection.

Stay Safe and Fight Pests

12/11/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Person spraying pesticidesCTAHR's Risk Management Hawai‘i will conduct a workshop on Proper Pesticide Use and Safety, Wednesday, December 18, 6:00–8:00 p.m. at the Pahala Community Center. The workshop will cover the Federal Worker Protection Standard (WPS) for agricultural workers and pesticide handlers. Anyone who uses or handles pesticides is at risk, but improper use or storage can put neighbors, property owners, children, pets, and the environment at risk as well. Learning how to be compliant with the WPS will minimize risks for all involved. RSVP with Gina at (808) 322-4892 or ginab@hawaii.edu by Monday, December 16.

Editing Bioresources

12/11/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Samir KhanalSamir Khanal (MBBE) has recently been invited to join the editorial board member of a prestigious international refereed journal, Bioresource Technology. The journal publishes high-quality research papers in the field of bioenergy and biobased products and biological waste treatment. The journal ranks number one in the agricultural engineering field and number five amongst those dealing with energy and fuels.

The Best Gift Ever!

12/11/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

New CTAHR t-shirts in pink and dark greenSpread some holiday cheer with CTAHR shirts! Just a reminder that the new CTAHR “People Place Promise” T-shirts are available in pink and dark green, and would make an awesome gift. To order the new shirt, download the form. The other lovely fashion options, the sage-green petroglyph T-shirt and the classic polo shirt, are still available as well. CTAHR shirts make a wonderful gift any time of year!

Honolulu Fashion

12/11/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Breanne Lee and Jenna SatoAPDM alumnae Breanne Lee and Jenna Sato were featured in Honolulu magazine in October for Hawai‘i Fashion Month. Breanne’s creativity has led her to design a wedding gown inspired by the foxtrot and to create another dress crafted entirely from local plumeria for LICH’s recent Project Greenway. Jenna, a Nordstrom window presenter as well as a fashion designer, has created costumes for Hawaii Five-O and likes classic yet edgy pieces that are fun to wear. Both Breanne and Jenna enjoyed the opportunity to design for Hawai‘i Fashion Month and showcase their work. Awesome job, Breanne and Jenna!

Pasta Awesomeness

12/11/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Chef Mark and helperA big mahalo to everyone who risked a food coma for the pasta fundraiser for Typhoon Haiyan relief! The event raised more than $2,250, which will be matched dollar for dollar by a Filipino relief foundation. Pasta enthusiasts lined up about 11:15 and ate merrily until 1:30. True to his word, HNFAS’s Chef Mark Segobiano did not run out of food, although some of the more popular sauces did get wiped out! About 30 HNFAS students, led by the FSHN Council, helped out, with cooperation from the Center for Philippines Studies. Many generous participants gave more than the $8 per plate, adding even more aloha to the event. Thank you to everyone who helped out!

Crowdfunding the Costume Collection

12/3/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Dr. Lin and a student with a kimonoGo, go, get that funding! FDM’s Historic Costume Collection launched their first Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign. The campaign hopes to raise $10,000 to support conservation and display of the collection’s historically and culturally irreplaceable items. Curator Shu Hwa Lin (FCS, left) is looking to purchase museum-worthy cabinets and textile conservation materials as well as display cases to showcase this unique and awesome collection to the UH community. Learn more about the collection and how to help their crowdfunding campaign.

Pasta for a Good Cause

12/3/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

PastaEnjoy fresh-made Italian cuisine by HNFAS’s Chef Mark Segobiano on Friday, December 6, 11:00 a.m.–1:30 p.m. at AgSci 219. Each plate costs only $8.00, and funds will support Typhoon Haiyan relief efforts. The menu will include tossed Italian salad with homemade dressing, garlic and herb bread, beverages, and a variety of pasta (spaghetti, fettucine, penne rigatti, rigatoni, and macaroni) and sauces (vegetarian marinara, classic Bolognese, white clam, creamy mushroom, and 3-cheese). Eat up and help out!

Beefing Up Basil Protection

12/3/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

BasilCTAHR joins with other agricultural programs and companies to present the Basil Growers’ Multi Agency Workshop with Chinese Translations on Wednesday, December 4, 2 p.m. at the Pearl City Urban Garden Center. The workshop includes information on crop protection chemicals, marketing Hawai‘i products, an educational session on the top 3 basil pests, strategies for integrated pest and resistance management and more. Zhiqiang Cheng, PEPS’s new turf grass specialist, will assist in translating the workshop into Chinese.

Moth Management

12/3/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

A moth-damaged cabbageRandall Hamasaki (PEPS) and Maria “Didi” Derval Diaz-Lyke (HNFAS) will present the workshop “Managing Your Production Risk: Diamondback Moth and Insecticide Rotation Planning” on Thursday, December 12, at 6 p.m. at the Waimea Civic Center conference room. The workshop will not only cover Hawai‘i’s most resilient agricultural pest, but it will also outline insecticide planning for 2014 for cabbage growers and others who battle resistance-prone pests. Don’t forget to bring your pesticide card to get 2 credits toward pesticide recertification. RSVP to mddiaz@hawaii.edu or call Didi or Perci at 887-6183 by December 10.

Sustainable Ocean Farming

12/3/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Benny RonHNFAS’s Benny Ron shared his aquaponics and aquaculture expertise on ThinkTechHawaii. Benny explains the history and current state of controlled fish farming and plant cultivation research and outreach around the Asia Pacific region, as well as the challenges involved in both. He also details some of the projects and programs currently involved in aquaculture and aquaponics. Watch it on YouTube. The good part starts at around 6:30.

Culture and Agriculture

12/3/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Liko AStudents from the Liko A‘e Native Hawaiian Leadership Program recently visited the Sustainable and Organic Agriculture Program Learning Center at the Waimanalo Research Station. About 30 of these students participated in hands-on activities at the aquaponics facility and in the kalo collection. The learning center concept at Waimanalo and Poamoho stations aims to highlight the important research conducted at these locations to growers, students and the community.

Sustainability Is Elementary

12/3/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Noelani students and their vegetablesIt’s never too early to learn about sustainability! Noelani Elementary school’s 1st-grade class celebrated sustainable agriculture in an urban community with their fall harvest event on November 19. The day’s activities included Creating a GardenSoxx (inspired by PEPS’s Jim Hollyer), cleaning/prepping the vegetable harvest for veggie soup (inspired by HNFAS’s Maria Stewart), and planting seeds and collecting data from the 1st-grade Noelani Papaya Grove (with support from ADSC’s Desmond Ogata). The event was part of the school’s 1st-grade STEM project, in partnership with the Student Organic Farm Training program. SOFT student volunteers Mitchell Loo, Nate Ortiz, Gabe Sachter-Smith, Jeana Cadby, Andrew Dedrick, Sean Bell, Rose Wolfe, Doug Hunfeld, and Nate Nicholson helped make the day a fun learning experience for the future stewards of the land.

Heads Up for Upcoming Awards Nominations

12/3/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

CTAHR Banquet LogoAs you were giving thanks last week, maybe some outstanding colleagues came to mind as particularly worthy of our collective gratitude. Make a mental note now so you’re ready when the official call for nominations for CTAHR faculty and staff awards is made after the winter recess. The criteria, deadlines, and nominating process will be announced in January and posted on the CTAHR Awards Banquet website. The nomination deadline for the Outstanding Alumnus/Alumna award is January 31, 2014, and the deadline for nominations for six faculty/staff awards is Feb. 20, 2014. The awards are Excellence in Teaching, in Research, and in Extension; Outstanding Civil Service and Service by an APT Employee; and the Alvin T. and Charlotte C. Nakamura Hoku Award for an Individual with Administrative Potential.

The Hunt for Tiny Bacteria

12/3/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Daniel JenkinsDaniel Jenkins (MBBE) has been awarded a new USDA-NIFA grant of almost $500,000 entitled “New Engineered Approaches for Recovering Disperse Populations of Low-Tolerance Pathogens from Food.” The project is a spin-off of mobile agricultural diagnostic technology that has been used in the field to detect and identify harmful bacteria in plants. The existing technology examines such small samples, however, that the likelihood of detecting certain pathogens is also quite small. Daniel’s objective is to develop a hand-held technology to isolate and concentrate those pathogens directly from a sample, making them easier to detect. The project will specifically focus on foodborne pathogens for which there is very low or zero tolerance.

November



Fighting Invasive Species on the Internet

11/28/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Incision Point ApplicationThe TechLine Invasive Plant News website recently posted “A Practitioner’s Guide for Testing Herbicide Efficacy With the Incision Point Application (IPA) Technique on Invasive Woody Plant Species” by NREM’s James Leary and co-authors. Now, invasive plant fighters around the country can read about this calibrated, hygienic, and efficient field technique for administering herbicide directly to the vascular systems of invasive woody plant species and learn how to conduct their own experiments using the IPA technique.

Saving Lives, 78 Pints at a Time

11/28/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Students stand beside the Blood Drive signA big mahalo to everyone who turned out for CTAHR’s November 20 blood drive! The drive collected 78 pints of blood, which can be separated into three components, saving as many as 234 lives. The precious gift of life not only helps those who need the blood, but touches the lives of the families of the recipients as well. The Blood Bank and CTAHR truly appreciates the time and generosity of everyone who contributed to this successful event and giving the precious gift of life. Much mahalo to those who came out to donate blood. Thank you to the CTAHR Alumni Association for the support and generous donation to supply Kamehameha Bakery poi malasadas. Also, thanks to the scholarship recipients who helped throughout the day and provided a positive and comfortable environment for those who came to donate. Great job, everyone!

Fight Pests, Grow Coffee

11/28/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Coffee plantA little insect can do a lot of damage. Andrea Kawabata (TPSS) will conduct a workshop on how to combat the Coffee Berry Borer, Monday, December 2, 6 p.m. at the Hilo Coffee Mill. Coffee growers on the Big Island have been battling CBB since its arrival in 2010. Andrea will teach farmers about effective and environmentally friendly integrated pest management, including prevention of new CBB introductions, field sanitation, and monitoring. CTAHR will also discuss risk management and crop insurer policies. Interested? RSVP Gina at (808) 322-4892.

Get Those Pests! Save That Wood!

11/20/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Ken Grace and Tammy the TermiteAssociate Dean for Research Ken Grace was happily surprised to be honored with the 2013 Distinguished Service Award from the Hawai‘i Pest Control Association, recognizing his research and educational efforts on behalf of the pest control industry. The HPCA represents all the structural pest management professionals in Hawai‘i and has been a consistent supporter of CTAHR, especially at the annual Awards Banquet. Ken was also selected by the American Wood Protection Association to give the Colley/Hartford Memorial Lecture, established to recognize significant research accomplishments in the field of wood preservation, this year at their annual meeting. To top it all off, he organized an international symposium on current termite prevention research for this year’s meeting. Congratulations on the range of honors!

Supporting Military Families Internationally

11/20/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Janice PascuaJanice Pascua, a graduating FAMR senior, received a competitive paid internship in Naples, Italy, with the Navy Fleet and Family Readiness Program. The 15-week experience involves enhancing programmatic/childcare efforts, connecting families to support systems, and engaging new youth/families in programs. Janice is the first person to apply for this internship from UH and has previous internship experience with the Mindfulness-Based Adventure Camp for Military Youth led by Claire Nakatsuka and Thao Le (both FCS)—Go for it, Janice!

CTAHR at the APLU

11/20/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Dean Gallo and Associate Dean KinoshitaDean Maria Gallo and Associate Dean Charly Kinoshita represented CTAHR at the Annual Meeting of the Association of Public and Land-grant Colleges (APLU) on November 12 in Washington, D.C. At the closing keynote address, USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack spoke passionately about the need for passing the Farm Bill this year, as well as the importance of educating America about the significance and needs of rural America. Vilsack’s address can be viewed online.

The Wonderful World of Piligrass

11/20/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Orville BaldosCongratulations to Orville Baldos (TPSS), who successfully defended his PhD dissertation on piligrass seed dormancy, smoke-stimulated germination, and harvest timing on November 15! Piligrass, a native, drought-tolerant grass found in the dry areas of the main Hawaiian islands, is being considered for roadside re-vegetation and erosion-control purposes. In recent years, there has been a move—led in part by Orville’s advisor Joe DeFrank (TPSS)—toward utilizing native plants not only for ecological restoration and re-vegetation, but also for other purposes such as urban greening, agricultural buffer strips, forage, and biofuels. Check out Orville’s YouTube channel for the video of his defense as well as his other research videos.

Bake Sale Happiness

11/20/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

BrowniesThe FSHN Council will hold their annual bake sale on Monday and Tuesday, November 25 and 26, from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in Campus Center and the Ag Sciences building lobby. This year the toothsome selection includes pumpkin mochi, snickerdoodles, cake pops, brownies, white chocolate craisin blondies, and double chocolate cookies. If you were lucky enough to get your pre-order in for select items (the option is now, sadly, closed), pick-up will be in the Ag Sciences building lobby, also on the 25th or 26th from 10:30 to 1:30. Cash and checks (made out to the Food Science and Human Nutrition Council) are accepted. Feel free to indulge—it’s for a good cause! Proceeds from the bake sale go to help the FSHN Council, which allows students to network with other students, faculty, and professionals in food science, nutrition and other health-related fields and offers career information, scholarships opportunities, and community service activities. And they’re stellar bakers!

Go, Navy Green!

11/20/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Navy vesselsMBBE will be hosting Joelle Simonpietri of the U.S. Pacific Command, who will discuss the U.S. Navy’s Great Green Fleet Initiative, on November 21, 3:30 p.m. at St. John 11. The Great Green Fleet is one of the five features of the Navy’s overall plan to reduce its consumption of energy, decrease its reliance on foreign sources of oil, and significantly increase its use of alternative energy. The fleet is a Carrier Strike Group fueled by alternative sources of energy including advanced biofuel blends and nuclear power. Through this and a variety of other energy-efficiency technologies, the Navy is committed to have 50% of their energy needs to be met by alternative sources by 2020.

First Steps to Big Careers

11/13/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Matthew Goo, a Horticultural Sciences graduate speaks to studentsThe Academic and Student Affairs Office hosted its annual CTAHR Career Conference in Gilmore Hall on November 5. Students had the opportunity to hear from speakers in the seed industry, agriculture in the public sector, natural resource management, and technology, and they learned about potential jobs and how to prepare for careers in these fields. Students and employers also had a chance to chat and mingle during the networking intermission. A warm thank you goes to all who attended the career conference, to scholarship recipients for volunteering, and to ASAO, especially Felicia Geronimo, for organizing this event. Also, much mahalo is due to DuPont Pioneer and Monsanto for providing refreshments. Lastly, a big thank you goes to the workshop presenters who came out that evening to share with the students what they do and their pointers for working in agriculture and natural resource management careers.

A Life of Pest Control Honored

11/13/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Marshall Johnson examining plantsMarshall W Johnson, formerly of PEPS, was honored November 10 at the Entomological Society of America annual meeting in Austin, Texas. Dr. Johnson, a 2006 Fellow of the Entomological Society of America, was feted with a special symposium that highlighted his lifelong work as an integrated pest management extension specialist and researcher. Former CTAHR faculty Bruce Tabashnik, Vincent Jones, and Cerruti Hooks were among the speakers honoring him. A native North Carolinian, Dr. Johnson spent 19 years at UHM, rising through the ranks to full professor and entomologist in 1992. He also served as chair of the Entomology Department from 1996 to 1998 and vice-chair of PEPS, 1998 to 2002. He and his wife, Lynn LeBeck (also an entomologist and former CTAHR faculty member!), now reside in Clovis, California. Congratulations, Dr. Johnson!

Two Ways to Get Rid of Weeds

11/13/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

GoatsDisease is just one of the many things to guard against when raising goats, and now there’s a wide-ranging and useful new discussion of this potentially lucrative activity—it also explains which breeds are best for Hawai‘i, notes when to schedule important milestones such as breeding and dehorning, and answers that oft-asked question, “Can goats really eat anything?” Goats can be very useful for eating unwanted plants, but since even they have their limitations, you may also need another new publication, which explains how to test which pesticides do best at eliminating weed trees, using a technique that has a much smaller environmental impact than those previously employed.

Keeping Yourself and Your Plants Healthy

11/13/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Bag of spring mix greensLet’s hope you don’t have any Cyclospora cayetanensis lying around your house—this single-celled parasite can cause serious foodborne illness. Find out how to avoid it and the disease it causes, cyclosporiasis. Also helping you to avoid foodborne illness is a new guide to the handling and labeling requirements for bagged leafy greens, which have now been classified as a potentially hazardous food owing to the many outbreaks of disease associated with them. Bacterial Wilt of Ginger won’t cause any disease in humans, but it can decimate a farmer’s ginger crop—learn how to deal with this potentially devastating problem before it impacts the Island supply further!

Farming, Naturally

11/13/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Green plantsIf you’ve gotten caught up in the excitement swirling around Natural Farming techniques, you’ll be glad to know that there’s a new series of extension bulletins coming out describing the various inputs needed in the system. Find out the many uses of Fermented Plant Juice (FPJ) and when’s the right time to harvest the growing shoots to make it. And then try your hand at creating and deploying some Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB). Made of simple ingredients you’ve probably got in or around your house, these inputs are reputed to work wonders, so try mixing up a batch today!

Can-Do at Purdue

11/5/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Jordan OshiroFSHN alumnus Jordan Oshiro, now pursuing a PhD at Purdue University in Nutrition Science, recently wrote to thank Dean Gallo for her “words of wisdom and example, which made a big impact in my personal/professional development.” He added, “Best wishes to you and I’ll continue to keep you, CTAHR, and UH in my thoughts and prayers!” Jordan, who graduated in December 2012, distinguished himself while at CTAHR in many ways, including winning the HNFAS Best Undergraduate Poster Presentation Award at the 2010 CTAHR Student Research Symposium, CTAHR’s Best Undergraduate Oral Presentation Award at the 2011 Student Research Symposium, and an Undergraduate Research Funding Award at UH’s 2011 Undergraduate Research Opportunities Symposium. He was a student ambassador for the college and also served as one of CTAHR’s two student marshals at UHM’s Fall 2012 Commencement. Beyond that, he was part of an undergraduate R&D team that developed a new food product from food processing by-products, now being sold through UH’s Kulanui brand. He also served as an RA and a tutor in the FSHN program. He completed a summer research internship at USDA’s Food Quality Laboratory and another internship at a local agriculture company. There seems no doubt that he will continue to distinguish himself at Purdue!

Whimsical Threads

11/5/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Lauren HayashibaraAPDM alumna Lauren Hayashibara was featured in Midweek magazine along with her clothing collection 19th and Whimsy, available at select stores in the Islands. The collection, she explains, seeks to add festive, whimsical touches to casual, contemporary clothing. Lauren graduated in Spring 2008 and has since clearly put her degree to good work.

Don't Fight the Feeling

11/5/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Rona Bennett and Lan ChungThe clothing company Fighting Eel, established by CTAHR alumna Lan Chung (APDM 1996, right) and Rona Bennett (left), also a UH alumna, just won the Established Designer of the Year Award at the Governor’s Fashion Award ceremony. The company, established in 2003, brings together “a blend,” as their web page explains, “of sexy and simple” in pieces that are “surprisingly versatile and comfortable.”

In the Fields

11/5/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

LIFE logoCTAHR’s LIFE program for immigrant farmers is highlighted in the November issue of the newsletter Rural Connections. Jari Sugano and the LIFE team explain that LIFE follows the model of “taking the university to the people,” going out to farms to provide hands-on education to underserved populations of growers such as recent immigrants, Native Hawaiians, and women. An important element of their success is getting feedback from their target communities to make sure they’re meeting the needs that should be met—pest control, new varieties of produce, and marketing/adding value are high priorities. Another focus of the group is looking for new ways to attract and connect with their audience, from field days and workshops to printed material in a variety of languages. And from all assessments that the program has conducted, they’re succeeding where it counts—in the eyes of their stakeholders.

Totally Tomatoes

11/5/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

TomatoesTomato growers recently gathered at Twinbridge Farms in Waialua to evaluate virus-resistant tomatoes as part of the WSARE project "Low-Input Integrated Management of Tomato Viruses in Hawaii,” with co-PIs Leyla Kauffman and Mark Wright). PEPS master’s student Amber Tateno updated attendees on progress as part of her thesis work, and everyone had the opportunity to taste the varieties and evaluate their flavor. Get more information on the project here, or contact Leyla Kaufman at leyla@hawaii.edu.

Paying It Forward

11/5/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

ATOLL graduates in Rota teaching aquaponicsIn the spring the Aquaculture Training On-Line Learning (ATOLL) program, offered by CTAHR and Olomana Gardens, presented certificates with a specialty in aquaponics to its first five interns from Rota in the Northern Mariana Islands in a moving ceremony attended by Dean Gallo and Douglas Vincent (HNFAS) and broadcast to Rota. Now the graduates, affectionately known as “The Magnificent 5,” are ready to conduct training to community members and school students on Rota who are interested in aquaponics food-production systems at their newly built Rota Aquaponic Education and Training Center. Just one more great example of the way CTAHR’s education and extension seek to help communities to help themselves.

Champion of the Elderly

11/5/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Sarah Yuan being commissioned for Board of Elder AffairsSarah Yuan (COF) was recently sworn in at Washington Place during the 2013 Commissioning Ceremony for Commissioners and Board Members, for a governor’s appointment with the Policy Advisory Board for Elderly Affairs. Members are selected for “their ability to make contributions to the solution of problems relating to aging,” a charge Sarah is well qualified to fulfill owing to her work on intergenerational relationships and the demographics of aging. The honor is even greater in that she may be one of the youngest members of the board, a majority of which is required to be over 60 years old! She is pictured here with Chief Justice Mark E. Recktenwald (left) and State Senator Ron Kouchi (right).

The Root of Culture

11/5/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Pounding poiTaro aficionados, take note: The Doris Duke Theatre will be hosting its third ‘Oiwi Film Festival, dedicated to work directed by indigenous Hawaiian filmmakers, November 8–13. One of the films to be screened is Kalo Culture, which follows taro farmer Daniel Anthony and his quest to raise awareness of this integral cultural food and the way of life it fosters. There will also be a kalo-pounding demonstration at the screening.

Agrosecurity Avatars

11/5/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Faculty Candidates AnnouncedDuring the next month, PEPS will be interviewing three promising candidates for the Agrosecurity position. Mohammad Arif of Kansas State University will visit November 7–8, giving a research seminar on November 7 at 9:30 a.m. in Gilmore 306 on “Biosecurity and Microbial Forensics: Disciplinary Synergy to Meet Agrosecurity Needs,” while CTAHR’s own Michael Melzer will be offering his research seminar on “Safeguarding Hawaii’s Agriculture” on November 20 at 9:15 a.m. in Gilmore 302. Finally, Carrie Harmon of the University of Florida will be visiting December 3–4, giving a seminar on December 3 at 9:15 a.m. in Gilmore 306 on “Collaborative Research in Detection and Diagnosis: Meeting the Challenge of Invasive Species and Economic Constraints.” All are welcomed to attend the seminars, and anyone wishing to schedule a meeting with any of the candidates should contact Scot Nelson at 956-6741 or snelson@hawaii.edu. The seminars will also be recorded by video and made available for viewing online.

The Power and Precision of Plant Breeders

11/5/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Faculty Candidates AnnouncedDean Gallo has invited four well-qualified candidates to interview for the Tropical Crops Plant Breeder position in TPSS. Each week in November, a different candidate will present a seminar on her or his research interests and accomplishments, indicating how these have prepared him or her for the position. Each will also make a separate teaching presentation on the topic “The Use of Molecular Markers Increases the Power and Precision of Classical Plant Breeding.” The first candidate is Alan Chambers, a recent graduate from University of Florida, whose PhD research involved using genomic approaches to identify genes affecting strawberry quality traits. Dr. Chambers’ presentations are scheduled for Wednesday and Thursday, November 6 and 7. His research seminar will be given at 1:00 p.m. on Wednesday in St. John 106, while his teaching presentation will take place 11:00 a.m. on Thursday in the same room. Manoa faculty who wish to meet individually with Dr. Chambers can contact Richard Manshardt at manshard@hawaii.edu or 956-6063. Polycom is available if outer island faculty/staff want to view the presentations or seminar, and they should also contact Richard Manshardt.

October



LICH for Posterity

10/31/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Ethel Villalobos giving presentation on pollinators to LICH conferenceThe video team of Joe DeFrank, Scott Lukas, and Orville Baldos (all TPSS) recorded 18 of the 26 sessions at the 2013 LICH Conference, the first time that recordings were made! Of these select recorded sessions, 10 are on native plants and 8 on general landscape issues, such as Ethel Villalobos’ (PEPS) presentation on pollinator-friendly planting (pictured). The videos are now online and available for interested viewers to check out sessions they may have missed, review important information, or share with a colleague.

Cutting-Edge Fashion . . . Scholarship

10/31/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Cover image of Critical Studies in MenAndy Reilly (FCS) recently launched the first issue of a new journal, Critical Studies in Men’s Fashion, of which he is the principal editor and creator. It will come out three times a year, offering critical examinations of the multi-faceted dimensions of men’s dress. The journal uses the holistic definition of dress as a means of examining the tangible and intangible aspects of creating and maintaining appearance. The topics of gender, identity, sexuality, culture, marketing, and business come together in this, the first and only academic journal to focus exclusively on men’s appearance and dress. Men’s dress and fashion have long been sidelined in scholarship, and this journal provides a dedicated space for the discussion, analysis, and theoretical development of men’s appearance from multiple disciplines. As one reader from Finland exclaimed, “I’ve waited 50 years for this!”

Beyond the Mouth

10/31/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Maria Stewart teaching workshop on foodMaria Stewart (HNFAS) and two FSHN students, Kelli-Ann Zakimi and Maile Ishikawa, recently offered a workshop at the 2013 Astronaut Lacy Veach Day held at Punahou School. At the 12th annual celebration of the Space Shuttle astronaut and of all things science related, geared for students in Grade 4 and up, there were many exciting-sounding workshops, including ones showing how to build a “Bristlebot” or dissect a cow’s eye. But perhaps none promised to unlock a bigger mystery than the one offered by this intrepid CTAHR trio: “What Happens to Your Food After You Eat It?” For despite all the discussion of food in the news, food’s afterlife hasn’t made it to the same level of public discourse. But this may be about to change, thanks to a “superb” workshop that, as the event’s organizer enthused, made “students realize that STEM is exciting, challenging, and fun”!

The Great Pumpkin Does Exist, Charlie Brown!

10/31/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Winner of pumpkin contestEast HawaIi 4-H and the 4-H Junior Master Gardener Program joined with the Waimea Town Market at Parker School and the Hawaii Island School Garden Network to organize the Fifth Annual Big Island Giant Pumpkin Contest at the Waimea Town Market in Kamuela. For this event, sponsored by the agricultural chemical company BEI Hawaii and Crop Production Services, pumpkin seedlings were given out to interested Big Island youth, schools, farmers, and the general public so they could try their hands at growing a monster-size pumpkin. Those who were successful in producing pumpkins brought them to the final weigh-in on October 5. This year there was a record-breaker weighing in at 636 pounds, grown by the Hawaii Preparatory Academy. The second-place winner, at 171 pounds, was grown by East Hawaii 4-H county agent Becky Settlage. Other categories included Most Beautiful (Pumpkin), won by Hilo Union Elementary, and Most Unusual and Best Record Keeping/Photo Diary, both of which were won by Kea‘au Elementary School. Although only about a dozen pumpkins made it to the contest, the event was able to interest over 1,000 youth in gardening, and the growers used critical thinking, problem-solving, and science skills as they learned about plant parts and reproduction, pollination, diseases, and many other aspects to growing a giant pumpkin. Best of all, many are interested in growing them again next year. Check out fun photos from the contest on the East Hawaii 4-H and East Hawaii 4-H Livestock Facebook page!

Back in Time, Towards the Future

10/31/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Bradley Kai Fox explaining aquaponics to Japanese farmersMagoon recently hosted a special group of visitors. As part of a rebuilding strategy for Japan, shortly after World War II, the University of California and the California Farm Bureau Federation in partnership with the Japanese government established the JPN Farm Trainee Program, which provided training for future farmers throughout Japan on farms in the US. Fifty years ago, the 12th cohort of the Farm Trainee Program stopped in Hawai‘i on their way to California and was hosted by CTAHR faculty and administrators; they still remember with gratitude then-Dean Baron Goto and Professor Kenneth Otagaki. Last week 45 members of the original cohort, now in their 70s and 80s, returned to Hawai‘i for a 50-year reunion, and their very first stop was CTAHR. The visitors received a warm welcome and an overview of CTAHR, UH, and the state of Hawai‘i agriculture; then they toured Magoon’s research projects, including aquaponic systems, organic farming, turf, propagation of native plants for use along the highways, tropical flower breeding, and more. Then they were introduced to tropical floriculture breeding by Tessie Amore (TPSS), received an update on tropical fruit production by Richard Manshardt (TPSS), visited the aquaponics facility at Hale Tuahine as guests of Bradley “Kai” Fox (MBBE, pictured), and took part in a mini Hawai‘i-style bocce ball game led by Joe DeFrank (TPSS). The visitors were inspired by the developments in agriculture in Hawai‘i and awed by the transformation of the Islands since their visit a half-century ago.

Get to the Root of Sustainability

10/31/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Sweetpotatoes harvested and in the fieldIn a fruitful collaboration, the Sustainable Pest Management Lab, the Sustainable and Organic Agriculture Program, Local and Immigrant Farmer Education (LIFE), and Risk Management Hawaii are presenting a CTAHR Sustainable Agriculture Workshop with a special focus on sweet potato production. It all comes together on Tuesday, November 5, from 8 a.m. to 12 noon in the Aupuni Center Conference Room at 101 Pauahi St. in Hilo. This workshop will provide fresh produce growers with new approaches for managing risk through the use of sustainable agriculture farming strategies and reduced pesticide use, focusing on using locally available inputs and conservation practices. There will be an evaluation of 60 different sweet potato cultivars by Susan Miyasaka (TPSS), a survey of post-harvest treatments, and a guide to pest identification. Koon-Hui Wang and Jane Tavares (both PEPS) will speak on “Sustainable pest management strategies using insectary settings for insect pest management and solarization mulch for weed control,” while Amjad A. Ahmad, Ted Radovich, and Nguyen V. Hue (all TPSS) will discuss “Nitrate release dynamic from four organic fertilizers.” Archana Pant (TPSS) and Ted Radovich will look at the “Beneficial use of locally produced inputs for plant growth, crop quality, and soil biological activity,” and Koon Hui Wang will explain “Nematode management with organic approaches.” If you love sustainable food production or sweet potatoes, don’t miss it! To RSVP, call Didi or Perci at 887-6183 or email mddiaz@hawaii.edu.

Lana‘i Power!

10/31/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Solar panels on LanaiByron Washom will discuss “Sustainable Energy Systems for Lana‘i” on Thursday, October 31, at 3:30 p.m. in St. John 11. He is on leave from his position as Director of Strategic Energy Initiatives at the University of California at San Diego to assist the company Pulama Lana‘i (formerly Lana‘i Resorts) to achieve energy sustainability on the island. He will discuss the initiatives on Lana‘i to reduce the island's dependence on external energy sources, including solar and hydroelectric.

Science Is Communicable

10/31/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Dione RossiterStudents and recent graduates will be interested in a talk that Dr. Dione Rossiter of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) will be giving from noon to 2 p.m. on Thursday, October 31 in POST 414 (IPRC Conference Room). Dr. Rossiter will describe how she made the switch from science to science outreach/education/engagement and why, explain the opportunities that exist in and outside of AAAS, including opportunities specifically for women and minorities in science, and discuss alternative careers in science. Snacks will be provided!

Getting Ghoulish

10/31/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

CTAHR admin staff in Halloween costumes
Ever thought working at CTAHR was a little scary? You didn’t know the half of it! Here the administration staff shows off their true Halloween spirit!

Na Pua

10/31/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Image of cover of 3rd quarter Impact ReportCTAHR’s educational impact goes far beyond college students, and this quarter’s Impact Report tells all about the work the college does with the younger members of the community. The stories describe keeping the keiki off the couch and on the playground with the CHL project’s work against childhood obesity; the science excitement at the Biotechnology Outreach Group’s Gene-ius Day workshops; and the multifaceted fun, learning, and good citizenship fostered by 4-H, presenting a picture of a college vibrantly involved in readying the next generation to take their places in the university and the world.

Native Green

10/22/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

LICH native plant poster imageDownload low- and high-resolution versions of LICH’s handsomely designed “Buy Native ~ It Matters” poster, and be sure to look for the CTAHR staff and publications featured on it! JB Friday provided some images and reviewed the poster, and several CTAHR publications are mentioned on the back, as well as one by CTAHR alumna Heidi Bornhorst, who’s now head of landscaping at UH. This should be a useful reference not only to landscapers but to many others who have the desire to step more gently on our fragile ‘aina.

Choose a Topic, Any Topic

10/22/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Protea information at the Maui FairThe Maui Fair is an annual event that provides a good opportunity to showcase CTAHR’s faculty, staff, and community partners working together to help the community. The ”CTAHR on Maui: People, Place, Promise” presentations at this year’s fair attracted the interest of many residents and visitors new to CTAHR. Featured were an array of CTAHR programs on topics such as lawn selection and care, coping with plant pest and diseases, youth programs, developing floral varieties, technology for the aging, home gardening, honeybees, invasive species, proteas (pictured) and safe and healthy eating. This wide range assured there was something for just about everyone—something that can also be said about the college.

Mellow on the Mall

10/22/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

KavaFest 2013Saturday, October 12, was the 10th annual Hawaii and Pacific Island Kava Festival, aka KavaFest. The festival is a educational activity organized by the ‘Awa Development Council and CTAHR’s HC “Skip” Bittenbender (TPSS). The festival’s origins date back to the Hawai‘i kava market crash in 2000. In 2003, Skip and members of the kava industry gathered in Hilo to plan how to save kava in Hawai‘i. They decided that Hawai‘i should focus on selling ‘awa beverages made with Hawai‘i varieties, educate the public about kava’s history and merits, and encourage its consumption as a social beverage—and the festival was born. Ten years later, Skip estimates that over 1,000 people attended the all-day event on McCarthy Mall. Skip and the 112 St. John Kava Circle sponsored the kava-tasting table. Volunteers at the table were Travis Idol (NREM) and graduate and undergraduate students Gabe Sachter-Smith, Greg Hoover, Kalani Matsumura, Jeffrey Caraballo, and Shawn Bell (all TPSS) and Roberto Rodriguez (MBBE). Loren Gautz (MBBE) led the production team, which made nearly 100 liters of kava from the CTAHR Waimanalo-grown varieties Mahakea, Mapulehu, and Iwi. Two types of kava beverage were made from the roots and stump of each variety, fresh-frozen and dried. CTAHR alumnus Alberto Ricordi was in charge of recruiting vendors for food, crafts, and of course kava from Fiji, Hawai‘i, Samoa, and Tonga.

Hands Across the Pacific

10/22/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Aquaponics Workshop in RarotongaA contingent from CTAHR was invited to Rarotonga in late September to provide expert consultation at an aquaponics workshop for the Pacific Islands region. They were invited to speak by the Secretariat of Pacific Communities (SPC), which represents 26 Pacific Island nations, to assist them in finding the aquaponics technology and techniques that would work for them. The expert team included Clyde Tamaru and Bradley “Kai” Fox (both MBBE), Clyde’s student Leinaala Bright, and a Master Gardener from Maui, Larry Yonashiro, who operates a large backyard aquaponics system. They each gave keynote presentations on different days of the conference, including a discussion of lower-cost, more reliable, and Pacific-friendly aquaponics systems and the community benefits of the technology. They also led hands-on activities, including testing water quality and building a whole system on-site at a commercial aquaponic farm called Te Raurau o te Kaingavai. The workshop aimed to share experiences from within and outside the region, review progress, and identify constraints in aquaponics; describe the most appropriate aquaponics systems and the critical success factors applicable to aquaponics in a Pacific islands context; and identify the aquaponics knowledge gaps which should be the focus of further research and capacity-building in the Pacific. And CTAHR helped the organizers to accomplish it all.

Grazing the (Taste of the) Range

10/22/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Halina Zaleski at Taste of the Hawaiian RangeMealani Research Station’s A Taste of the Hawaiian Range was held on October 4 at the Hilton Waikoloa on the Big Island. This educational food-tasting event featured over 30 chefs preparing bite-sized culinary delights of local, grass-fed meats, including beef, goat, lamb, mutton, and pork. In addition, over 30 exhibitors featured local artisanal products and educational displays. CTAHR faculty and staff were well represented: Halina Zaleski (HNFAS) and the Hawaii Pork Industry Association (pictured) offered product tasting, Sharon Motomura and Luisa Castro (both HI County) presented an educational display on food safety, and Susan Miyasaka (TPSS) gave a tasting of three different sweet potato varieties in a rainbow of colors. Over 2,000 participants and volunteers attended, helping to make this community-organized event the premier agricultural festival on the Big Island.

Beach Closed

10/22/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Beach closure signMarcus Peng (NREM) will be defending the proposal for his Master’s thesis, “Economic Valuation of Coastal Water Pollution Damage,” on Friday, November 1, at noon in Sherman 103. Kirsten Oleson is his chair, and his committee members are Catherine Chan-Halbrendt and Regina Ostergaard-Klem. As Marcus explains, his research “seeks to estimate the annual economic loss from anthropogenic coastal water quality degradation in Hawaii.” He points out that coastal waters are very important, supporting many different industries, uses, and species, yet they are threatened by development and other activities. To look at this degradation and its costs, he will focus on beach closures due to polluted water conditions. Come hear his discussion of this timely issue!

Juicy Red Delights

10/22/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Red Roma tomatoesWhether you have a hankering for Caprese salad or freshly made pasta sauce, you can find the star ingredient at the Horticulture Society’s Tomato Sale on Wednesday, October 23. Fresh, locally grown, vine-ripened cherry, grape, and Roma tomatoes will be on sale from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. between St. John & Ag Engineering, and prices for the tomatoes are a very reasonable $3.00/lb or an even better $5/2 lbs. Any questions, including “How can I wait until eleven for all that tomatoey goodness?” can be referred to the Hort. Society at uhmhortsociety@gmail.com.

Fashion Week in Miller

10/22/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Fashion Exhibition in Miller HallCheck it out—students in FDM 460, Costume Museum Management, have put on an exhibition of glam vintage garments in Miller 112, and some clothing and handcrafts are available in the Museum Gift Shop. The exhibition runs through Sunday, October 27, from 10 a.m to 3 p.m. Knitting Bees will also meet in Miller Hall Sunday afternoon from 1 to 3, so please bring your knit kits with you if you want to join a community of knitting enthusiasts!

Have Fun and Graduate!

10/16/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

4-H kids with glowsticksThe national 4-H program has been selected to participate in American Graduate Day 2013, part of the public media initiative American Graduate: Let’s Make It Happen, aimed at keeping students on the path to graduation. The event will feature local and national programming, community partners, and celebrities focused on improving the high school graduation rates in America; other partner organizations include Big Brothers Big Sisters and Boys & Girls Clubs of America. Research has shown that youth involved in 4-H are stronger in healthy behaviors, academic excellence, and civic engagement. In particular, 4-H science programs increase the number of students pursuing science, engineering, technology and applied math fields in their academic studies and careers, and 4-H’s healthy living initiatives help participants to eat right and keep active. And the most fun thing about the video being used to introduce the 4-H segment is that it includes two photos from the Hawai‘i 4-H program: one of three boys with glow sticks who took part in the Kona 4-H Fun Day and the other of Kaua‘i 4-H members offering an activity at the Kaua‘i Garden Fair. Go Hawai‘i 4-H!

Biofuels Take Flight!

10/16/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

BanagrassOwing to the biofuel research group headed by Andy Hashimoto (MBBE and Sun Grant Subcenter), UH has recently been selected as one of the leaders of the Federal Aviation Administration’s new Air Transportation Center of Excellence (COE), which focuses on alternative jet fuels and the environment. US Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx explains that the COE, a research partnership between academia, industry, and the federal government, will help to “take environmentally friendly, alternative jet fuel technology to the next level.” The selected university members all have nationally recognized environmental and/or aviation-related education programs. Over the course of the next 10 years, the FAA will be granting the Center $40 million. Members, like the UH group for which Andy is PI, will also be eligible to negotiate individual contracts with relevant federal agencies. This new designation by the FAA should result in a number of research contracts, some already under discussion, for UH and the national team of universities forming the COE. Congratulations on another exciting opportunity and recognition of the national standing of our CTAHR group in biofuel research!

Grants From Sun Grant

10/16/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Woman filling her car with biomethane in SwedenSamir Khanal (MBBE) recently received a highly competitive bioenergy grant from Sun Grant Western Regional Center funded through the U.S. Department of Transportation. This 2-year, $200,000 grant aims at developing an anaerobic digestion (AD) bio-refinery using high-yielding tropical bioenergy feedstocks in a decentralized closed-loop system for producing diverse high-value co-products and/or liquid/gaseous biofuels. Pictured is a Swedish woman filling her car with biomethane. Find out more about Samir’s anaerobic digestion research here! The Sun Grant Initiative is a national network of land-grant universities and federally funded laboratories working together to further establish a bio-based economy; these institutes are at the forefront of research and innovation involving bioenergy and biofuels production. CTAHR is also a home of the Western Insular Pacific Sun Grant Subcenter, led by Andy Hashimoto (MBBE).

A Full Crop of Honors

10/16/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

James BrewbakerDean Maria Gallo has been named a Crop Science Society of America (CSSA) Fellow for 2013. The international science organization will present this, its highest honor, to her and 10 others from across North America on November 6 during its annual meeting in Tampa, Fla. Fellows are elected by select CSSA members based on professional achievements and meritorious service; they comprise just 0.3 percent of the society membership. Dean Gallo is honored for her work on plant genetics, using molecular biology and biotechnology techniques to improve the performance and quality of tropical energy and agronomic crops. The college’s former Dean William Furtick and the late soil scientist Goro Uehara also received the honor, as did these CTAHR alumni: Kenneth G. Cassman, Ganesan Srinivasan, Soon-Kwon Kim, Donald Plunkett, and Surajit K. DeDatta. Another CSSA Fellow (and founding member) is CTAHR plant breeder and corn expert James Brewbaker (TPSS, pictured), who this year has also been selected to receive another honor, CSSA’s Presidential Award. This award recognizes outstanding contributions to crop science through education, national and international service, and research. Dean Gallo will receive the award on his behalf. For more than 60 years, “Dr. B” has developed new varieties of crops for improved nutrition, yields, and pest and disease resistance. Recruited by CTAHR to establish a sweet corn improvement program, he was instrumental in developing the seed corn industry into the state’s most valuable agricultural crop. He has also done extensive work on tropical legume trees, and he established Hawai’i Foundation Seeds to manage parent seed stocks. Congratulations to Dean Gallo and Dr. B!

VP of Fashion

10/16/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Andy ReillyAndy Reilly (FDM) recently was elected vice president of Research and Scholarship for the International Textile and Apparel Association. The duties of his three-year term include planning future annual conferences, facilitating recognition of diverse types of research and scholarship, and promotion awards. Andy recently hosted the 2012 ITAA annual conference in Honolulu, and his skilled handling of this successful event undoubtedly contributed to his election.

The Secret Garden of St. John

10/16/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Young plants in hydroponic systemDid you know there’s a hydroponic learning center on the 6th floor of St. John? Established with a grant from the Women’s Campus Club, it has seven different systems set up; they’re growing mizuna, tomato, red choi, and peppers so far, with space for more to come. The project hopes to expand, testing different vegetables to see how well they do in an urban growing environment, in service of its mission to educate everybody interested in urban hydroponics and gardening. The center is also hoping to attract further donations to improve and expand so that more people can benefit, adding such important components as permanent signs, different and more hydroponic systems, and alternate hydroponic nutrient solutions. Come by and visit the center, or email Robert Saito at rjnsaito@hawaii.edu for more information.

Eat Up Some Information

10/16/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Participants at UH Food DayCome to the 3rd annual Food Day for food, fun, information, and a chance to hear a presentation by Jinan Banna (HNFAS). She will discuss the issue of food insecurity and the importance of improved access to healthful food, which many low-income families in Hawai‘i lack. The event takes place in the Campus Center Ballroom on October 24 from noon to 1:30 p.m. Food Day supports access to sustainable, healthful, and affordable food; it will be celebrated this year in schools and community festivals nationwide. Its mission is to inspire public support for sustainable farming, local food, and healthful lifestyles. Another guest speaker will be Chelsea Bell of Hawaii Meals on Wheels, who will discuss her work providing hot, nutritious meals to Hawai‘i’s kupuna. UH Sodexo Chef Carl Peterson will be providing a food demonstration in collaboration with Donna Ojiri, CTAHR alumna and the general manager of Sodexo. There will be food tasting, booths featuring ways to get involved, information on careers in food and nutrition, and games. Last year’s Food Day was well attended, so RSVP this year to ensure your spot at the table and get the chance to connect with Hawai‘i’s food and agriculture community!

Growing a Green Partnership

10/16/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

CTAHR students presenting at LICH conferenceThe LICH conference/tradeshow, which this year highlighted native plants, was enriched by the participation of nine CTAHR students (pictured) and several faculty and alumni, including Andy Kaufman (TPSS), Jay Deputy (TPSS, retired), Ethel Villalobos and Zhiqiang Cheng (both PEPS), and Heidi Bornhorst, CTAHR alumna and head of landscaping at UH. Here’s to the strong association between the college and the landscaping organization, and here’s to this year’s conference theme, native plants. In a new twist on a familiar phrase, plant native—it matters!

Knee-Deep in Mud, High in the Sky

10/16/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Group for Meaningful Experience on KauaiIn the early morning of October 4, twenty-one CTAHR students and staff headed over to Kaua‘i for the Tenth Annual Meaningful Experience. First stop was the Ho‘opulapula Haraguchi Rice Mill on Kauai’s North Shore, the last remaining rice mill in Hawai‘i, dating back to the 1800s. CTAHR alumna Lyndsey Haraguchi-Nakayama led the educational, interactive tour of the mill, now coupled with a taro farm. Everyone sampled taro smoothies, learned the background of farming in Kaua‘i, picked invasive apple snails from the lo‘i, viewed the historic mill equipment, and pounded taro into pa‘i‘ai. After a healthy and delicious lunch, the group headed back to Lihu‘e for team-building activities facilitated by ASAO’s Lisa Kitagawa-Akagi, for bonding and building interpersonal and communication skills. One of the students, Arby Barone, gave a short presentation on the background of Ni‘ihau, including plant and animal identification and a brief history, in preparation for the next day’s activities. The following morning, students headed out to Hanapepe on the south side of the island for the Ni‘ihau Helicopter Tour. They had the rare opportunity to fly over the island of Ni‘ihau and even set foot on the Forbidden Isle. Students also were able to explore the nearby areas, including Waimea Canyon. Finally, after a full day of cultural learning, the group headed back to the airport for the flight back to Honolulu. Thanks are due to Lyndsey Haraguchi-Nakayama and the Board of Directors of Ho‘opulapula Haraguchi Rice Mill for hosting the visit to their farm. Gratitude is also extended to Roy Yamakawa of the Kaua‘i County administration, for reserving space for the team-building activities, and to SAPFB and ASAO for supporting the students’ trip. And much mahalo goes to the student participants who made the experience meaningful for all.

A Celebration of Style

10/16/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

FDM fashion show for Fashion MonthThe first Hawai‘i Fashion Month has been going strong this October, and FDM faculty are fully involved in the activities: Andy Reilly served on the steering committee, while Young Bahng organized a speaking series where Ju-Young Kang and retired faculty Marcia Morgado and Carol D’Angelo gave presentations of their research. Abby Cristi and Cynthia Tsark planned and helped produce fashion shows, and Shu-Hwa Lin partnered with Hawai‘i State Art Museum to install an exhibit that opened for First Friday, October 4. The exhibit, “The Way We Wear,” is a visual history of fashion in Hawai‘i and a collaboration between the Art in Public Places Collection and the UHM Historic Costume Collection. The fashion show at the Museum, “Fashion as Art,” featured FDM graduates Ryan Hanaoka, Feliz Salas, Breanne Lee, Jaclyn Mae Santos, and Erin Midori Ludolph, along with current FDM students Sarah Yamashige and Lyle Amine, the photographer. Check out Lyle’s great photos, and find out more information about what’s on for the rest of the month.

Outwit the Viruses

10/16/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

tomatoesCheck it out—there’s a tomato variety trial field day coming up on Wednesday, October 23, from 10 a.m. to noon at Twin Bridge Farm in Waialua. Since the most effective management option for Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus (TYLCV) and Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus (TSWV) is the use of virus-resistant germplasm, it would be useful to know just what varieties have that resistance. So Leyla Kaufman (PEPS) and graduate student Amber Tateno are hosting a field day to showcase 14 commercially available varieties currently being field-tested, most with putative dual resistance to TYLCV and TSWV. Varieties are being evaluated on yield, virus resistance, and fruit quality and have different fruit types: grape, cherry, beefsteak, round, and globe. The field day will give farmers and agricultural professionals the opportunity to see the horticultural characteristics of the different varieties on-farm, as well as taste tomatoes. In turn, growers’ comments will help to determine the different plants’ desirability for the local industry and narrow down varieties for future trials. For information or to request an auxiliary aid or service, such as a sign language interpreter, designated parking, or materials in alternate format, contact Leyla Kaufman (956-2450), Jensen Uyeda (juyeda@hawaii.edu) or Jari Sugano (suganoj@ctahr.hawaii.edu) at (808) 622-4185 by Wednesday, October 16.

Effects of Abuse

10/16/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Loriena YancuraLoriena Yancura (FCS) recently co-authored an article in the Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment and Trauma showing that women who were victims of childhood physical abuse are 40% more likely to develop thyroid conditions than women who were not abused during childhood. A study of of 13,070 adult Canadians showed that more than 1,000 reported being physically abused before age 18, and 906 said they had been diagnosed with a thyroid disorder by a health professional. Lori says that “the enduring effects of childhood maltreatment may be due to the way early traumas change the way an individual reacts to stress throughout life. One important avenue for future research is to investigate potential dysfunctions in the production of the ‘fight or flight’ hormone cortisol among survivors of abuse.” The paper offers important insights—and illustrates the breadth of CTAHR research.

Water for All

10/16/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Angela Stevens and other SAIWI wordersNREM undergrad alumna Angela Stevens, who has just finished up her first year of graduate study at the University of Nevada-Reno, recently got in touch with her previous advisor, Creighton Litton, to share her successes since CTAHR. A Caesars Foundation Fellow in Watersheds and Environmental Sustainability, she’s been featured in the local television news and the Tahoe Daily Tribune for her work with the Desert Research Institute studying near-shore turbidity in Lake Tahoe, as well as on the DRI’s own website, on which she is quoted as saying, “Water is a big problem, and I want to be part of the solution.” She was definitely part of the solution on her February trip to Panama, described in an article at the University of Nevada’s website, where she joined two other students and a Peace Corps volunteer to build three composting latrines in a remote mountain village (here she’s pictured in the blue tank top). UN’s site also describes her work with the university’s International Education Week, for which she organized the Student World Water Forum last year. The knowledge and inspiration she gained at CTAHR, coupled with her own enthusiasm and drive, have put her well on her way to making an important difference in the world.

Ag-Appropriate Apps

10/16/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Person using smartphone in fieldLooking for the right app for your work, stakeholders, or students? There’s an app for that! Kent Kobayashi (TPSS) has developed a mobile website describing over 160 free iPhone/iPad apps available from the Apple App Store for horticulture and agriculture. The website is the result of an invited presentation, ”Are There Horticulture-Related Mobile Applications for Me?” that Kent gave at the 2012 American Society for Horticultural Science Annual Conference. As you might expect, the answer to the above question is a resounding “Yes!” The talk also led to an article, which will be appearing in the ASHS publication HortTechnology.

Leafy Treat

10/16/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Be-still treeEver had the desire to know how just many poisonous plants there are on the UH-Manoa campus? Medicinal trees? Agricultural crops? All of this information and more is available with a few moves of the mouse around the UH plant map created by Nate Ortiz (TPSS student) and Austin Stankus of the Zoology department. Both useful and just plain fun, this addictive and ingenious app was profiled in Ke Kumu ‘Ike, the newsletter of the Colleges of Arts and Sciences. The campus has been recognized by the Arbor Day Foundation as a USA Tree Campus, and as Stankus explains, it hosts trees that are found in no other US university’s landscape, so it behooves us to take notice of the verdant treasure all around. Each clickable tree yields an image, general information, and links to more detail. Pictured is the be-still tree, one of 27 lining Maile Way, according to the map—and yes, it’s poisonous.

Growers’ Woes

10/16/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Bagged and unbagged lychee paniclesOther CTAHR researchers are concerned with pests more visible to the naked eye. For lychee growers, the biggest issues aren’t pathogens; they’re fruitflies and birds, which can play havoc with the crop. Andrea Kawabata and Stuart Nakamoto show you how to grow fat, juicy, and blemish-free lychee by bagging the panicles before they ripen! If you’re looking to spray your crop pest troubles away but want to make sure your sprayers are properly calibrated, just check out the simple and effective methods for both boom and handheld spray systems offered by Jensen Uyeda, Jari Sugano, Steve Fukuda, Mike Kawate, Robin Shimabuku, and Koon-Hui Wang. And calibration isn’t the only issue related to spraying, as Andrea Kawabata, Stuart Nakamoto, and R.T. Curtiss’s CBB-management guidelines make clear; this publication explains how to sample for borer infestation levels to decide when to spray. Because unfortunately, the damage done by the borer is all too visible.

Greening the Garden

10/16/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Powdery mildew of zucchiniFeel like your gardening skills are getting a little…rusty? Don’t worry—it might not be you; it might just be phytopathogens. If you’re seeing rust on your canna lily, crucifers, or ‘ilima, check out the publications by Scot Nelson (with Erik Patnude on crucifers) that will set your garden on the path to shining, rust-free glory. Buff and wax not included. But don’t feel left out if you’ve got no rust; Scot may still have a publication that will solve your particular problem…especially if that problem is leaf spot on your beach morning glories or powdery mildew on your garden vegetables.

Up-and-Coming Interns

10/16/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Dietetics internsThe UH CTAHR Dietetic Internship program, which is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) of the national Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, welcomed its first interns this semester. The program requires 1,200 hours of experience and qualifies graduates to take the Registered Dietitian’s Exam. It also provides graduates of an academic program in dietetics with an opportunity to increase their knowledge of food and nutrition science, and to acquire competencies needed to practice dietetics in a variety of settings including clinical, food service, and community. The program offers a Community Concentration that focuses on Hawai‘i’s unique community. Through its activities, the internship will promote education of students in the multicultural environment, service in a variety of community settings and participation in various professional organizations. Pictured from left to right are dietetic interns, all of whom are graduates of the FSHN Dietetics program, Katherine Schuette (’13), Chrislin Yee (’13), Erika Chinn Galindo (’13), Tanieca Downing (’13), and Paul John Pangilinan (’11), and Internship Director Ann Ditzler.

Operation: Mindful Military Kids

10/16/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

OMK Military Adventure CampOperation: Military Kids, a 4-H program, offered the second annual Hawaii Adventure Camp (HAC) this summer. 50 military teens aged 14 to 18 residing in the Pacific Rim region, including Hawai‘i, Japan, Okinawa, and Guam, participated in the 5-day military teen adventure camp held at Camp Erdman on the North Shore of O‘ahu. HAC 2013, which focused on three major themes: physical fitness, mental fitness, and personal leadership, included activities such as horseback riding, snorkeling, low/high ropes course, surfing, and standup paddle boarding. The key element of this camp was the incorporation of daily mindfulness sessions. Mindfulness is the ability to focus on the present moment with acceptance, which is instrumental in fostering mental fitness. The mix of mindfulness practice, recreational fun, and team-building challenges provided the campers with the opportunity to enhance their problem-solving and leadership skills while building strong connections with other military-associated teens from around the Pacific Rim. The camp was made possible through funding from NIFA/USDA-DOD to FCS Extension specialist Claire Nakatsuka and FCS faculty Thao Le, in partnership with Hawaii OMK and YMCA Camp Erdman. 4-H OMK staff Kiki Yoshimoto and FCS intern Janice Pascual provided key support. Appropriately, Thao’s article about the first HAC and camp experience in Colorado, entitled “Mindfulness-Based Adventure Camp for Military Youth,” is currently in press at the Journal of Extension.

Improving Native Hawaiian Health

10/16/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Native Hawaiian Health symposium participantsBarbara “Bobbie” Yee, chair of FCS, organized a symposium entitled “Improving Native Hawaiian Outcomes in Health and Mental Health” for the American Psychological Association meeting held this summer in Honolulu. Pointing out that there are serious disparities between the physical and mental health of Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders and that of others in the Islands, she explains, “These disparities lead to poorer health and mental health outcomes across a number of social, educational, economic, health and wellness dimensions.” The symposium looked at ways psychology and Minority Fellowship Program fellows have advocated and developed public policy, pursued research with community capacity-building strategies, and developed career pathways that have contributed to the improvement of health and mental health outcomes for Native Hawaiians. Here Bobbie is pictured (second from right) with other symposium participants (left to right) Keawe‘aimoku Kaholokula, Chair of Native Hawaiian Health, JABSOM; Cecily Reber, Doctoral Candidate in Clinical Psychology and Tripler VA Psychology; and Kamana‘opono M. Crabbe, CEO, Office of Hawaiian Affairs).

From Vietnam With Love

10/16/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

CERED signs MOU with CTAHRDr Nguyen Ninh, Nobel laureate and contributor to the 2007 IPCC report on climate change, visited CTAHR to sign a Memorandum of Understanding between the college and the Center for Environment Research, Education and Development (CERED), which he represents. During their meeting in July, President Obama and Vietnamese President Truong Tan Sang had emphasized the importance of cooperation between the two countries in many different areas, including the environment and agriculture, and the Vietnamese government looks at this MOU signing as directly relevant with their national goals to collaborate with the U.S. The international MOU was created to facilitate collaborative work on soil fertility, particularly involving biochar, and crop development, particularly sweet corn and taro, in Vietnam and southeast Asia. The research and education efforts are expected to benefit Vietnam and surrounding nations, as well as Hawai‘i. After the signing, Dr. Ninh (pictured third from right) gave a presentation on the state of climate change in Vietnam, a chilling wake-up call. Check out photos of the event here.

You Say Tomato; Kacie Says Opportunity

10/16/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Kacie HoHNFAS alumna Kacie Ho, who is now pursuing graduate studies in food science at Purdue University, recently received a three-year National Science Foundation fellowship to support her research into the extraction of lycopene from tomato skins for use as a food enhancement or nutritional supplement. This honor comes in addition to a fellowship supporting her studies from Purdue and another through an industry fellowship program in which she interned at Cargill, Inc. in Minneapolis. Soojin Jun and Wayne Iwaoka (both HNFAS), who recommended her for the NSF fellowship, can be proud that their protégé is a continuing success. Many thanks to former CTAHR student marshal and fellow alumnus and Purdue grad student Jordan Oshiro for the information!

Small in Scale; Large in Impact

10/16/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Madagascar net fishermenPhD student Michele Barnes-Mauthe and Assistant Professor Kirsten Oleson (both NREM) recently published a landmark study on small-scale fisheries in the journal Fisheries Research, arguing that their economic value has been dramatically underestimated. Using the case of a coastal region of Madagascar, they show that these fisheries employ 87% of the adult population and provide the sole protein source for 99% of household meals. However, “Small-scale fisheries are often completely left out of policy discussions due to a lack of data about their scale and importance,” Michele points out—until now. Since the fish is sold locally or used for subsistence purposes, it doesn’t show up in larger economic discussions; nonetheless, the activity is crucial to the survival of the region. The same is true of many other coastal communities, where the importance of small-scale fishing has long been known but has not been quantified. With hard numbers in hand, the authors hope that management initiatives such as community-led marine areas will arise to safeguard the sustainability of subsistence fisheries and strengthen food security. Even more important, they argue, is that these be supported by regional, national, and international policies that safeguard the rights of small-scale fishers over export-orientated commercial or foreign access fishers where small-scale fisheries are central to the livelihoods of impoverished coastal populations.

She’s a Jolly Good Fellow

10/16/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Anne AlvarezAnne Alvarez (PEPS) has been honored as a Fellow of the American Phytopathological Society (APS), a distinction offered in recognition of distinguished contributions to plant pathology, whether in original research, teaching, administration, professional and public service, or extension and outreach. Anne is recognized as a pioneer in plant bacteriology, working on diseases of a wide spectrum of tropical plants. Her work ranges from bacterial ecology and epidemiology to phylogeny and molecular genetics, while the major goal of her research is to benefit growers by developing methods for managing bacterial diseases. She is recognized worldwide as an esteemed authority on plant-pathogenic bacteria who has made long-lasting contributions in her field, especially with regard to tropical plants. In short, her achievements, says the APS, demonstrate how research innovation and knowledge can directly benefit agriculture and education.

By the Insects, For the Insects

10/16/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Honey being pouredNeed some sweetness in your life? Ka Mea Kolo, CTAHR’s entomology club, is giving out 6 oz. jars of honey with every donation of $6 to Ka Mea Kolo, while supplies last. The honey, donated by the U.H. Honeybee Project, is from bees that fed off wildflowers in Wai‘anae, so it’s both local and delicious. Monetary donations will be used for supplies needed for Ka Mea Kolo’s stellar, kid-pleasing outreach events. Just email kameakolo@gmail.com to exchange a little folding green for a pot of gold, and help make a difference for the club that brings bugs and fun into children’s lives.

Cage o’ Fish

10/16/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

TilapiaThree participants in the Seafood Culinary Education Workshop hosted by HNFAS this past summer have since been interviewed on Hawaii Public Radio: workshop speaker Linda ODierno, outreach specialist for the National Aquaculture Association; Ron Weidenbach, president of the Hawaii Aquaculture and Aquaponics Association; and workshop organizer Tetsuzan “Benny” Ron, HNFAS aquaculture specialist. The workshop was sponsored by Aquaculture & Livestock Support Services of the Hawaii Department of Agriculture and by the National Aquaculture Association. Benny Ron makes the point that owing to the declining supplies of wild-caught fish, the solution is farm-raised—aquacultured—seafood, raised either in land- or ocean-based systems. He is presently organizing an environmental monitoring group comprised of federal and state representatives involved in the permitting process for aquaponics producers to make it easier to start an aquaponics operation. And just in time, too—Hawai‘i imported 800,000 pounds of tilapia from other countries just this past year!

Kids’ Savings Saves the Day

10/16/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Michael CheangMichael Cheang was interviewed about the Kids’ Savings Project on Hawaii Public Radio’s The Conversation with Chris VanderCook. He points out that even low-income families can and do save; it’s a matter of mindset and habit, as well as identifying and breaking down the barriers that may keep them from saving. His project, which has helped 1,800 kids in 28 DOE schools to save $322,000 since its inception, does just that. It brings the credit unions to the schools, provides $25 seed money to each participant, and fosters a spirit of community amongst the children saving—“like a savings club,” he says. Research has shown that children as early as 4 can learn economic concepts—and Michael’s project helps to ensure that they learn helpful ones!

A Great Exchange

10/14/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Poi doughnutWhich would you rather have—a poi doughnut from Kamehameha Bakery or a pint of your blood? There’s no question, right? Poi doughnuts, every time. Well, you’ll be glad to know you can make that very trade at CTAHR’s Blood Drive on November 20! If you’d like to donate, just get in touch with Sylvia Trinh and have the following info ready: First and last name, date of birth, email address, contact number, and preferred appointment time (time slots available every 15 minutes from 8:00 to 3:15). Sign up early so you’ll be certain enough doughnuts will be available! And since you lose a pound whenever you donate blood, you don’t have to feel guilty about eating up.

Seeds of Fun

10/14/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Richard Manshardt shows young girl how to make seed bombsWhen Ania Wieczorek (TPSS) was invited to present an educational booth on Agricultural Biotechnology at the Maui County Fair, she recruited CTAHR faculty and staff to join the fun. As part of this booth, volunteers Richard Manshardt, Susan Miyasaka, and Heather Kimball (all TPSS), Stephen Ferreira (PEPS), and Harold Keyser (Maui County administrator, retired) assisted children and adults young at heart in making seed “bombs.” Just as fun but not as explosive as it sounds, this was a hands-on activity in which compost potting medium was mixed with calcium bentonite (clay, that is) and water, formed into a small ball, and planted with a seed—beans, peas, corn, or papayas. The group hopes to encourage the next generation of young farmers or gardeners to get their hands dirty by growing plants!

That’s Pork Research Funding, Not Pork-Barrel Funding!

10/14/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Piggy bank on stack of moneyGot some porcine research ideas you’d like to get funded? The general call for proposals for 2014 is now available on the National Pork Board’s website, where you can also find information about the Board’s funding history. Submissions are due Tuesday, November 19 at 5:00 p.m. CST, so better piggy-back over to the site and get started.

Explore the World of an Explorer

10/6/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Maria FadimanThe UH-Manoa Ethnobiology Society will be hosting “An Evening with National Geographic” featuring speaker Maria Fadiman on October 7 from 6 to 8 p.m. in St. John 11, with heavy pupus to follow the presentation. Dr. Fadiman, who was recognized by National Geographic as an Emerging Explorer, is an ethnobotanist specializing in Latin American and African rainforest cultures. If you would like to attend, please RSVP to Melissa at 630-486-2926 or email ethnobio@hawaii.edu.

New Faces: Janis Morita

10/6/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Janis MoritaNow filling the invaluable position of Director of Administrative Services is Janis Morita, who joins CTAHR from ORS and is very familiar with grant submissions and the labyrinthine Kuali system, to everyone’s great delight. Dean Gallo writes, “Janis has excellent positive energy and will continue to improve our efforts to support the college. We are very happy to have her join us. Please welcome Janis to our CTAHR ‘ohana.” Welcome, Janis!

New Faces: Lydia Gerakas and Kellie Kong

10/6/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Kellie Kong and Lydia GerakisCTAHR welcomes Lydia Gerakas (pictured right) to her new position—she’s joined the Academic and Student Affairs Office as Charly Kinoshita’s new secretary. She’s not new to the college, though; she just moved over from PEPS, where she previously served as department secretary. PEPS’s loss is Academic Affairs’ gain! Academic Affairs also gains by the addition of Kellie Kong, who is creating the brand-new position of distance learning coordinator. She’s a PhD student in Educational Technology and is hard at work to help bring select CTAHR classes to those who can’t get to campus. Luckily, she’s not too far away herself—just downstairs in Gilmore. The college is excited about its new additions!

Sustainable Extension

10/6/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

SOAP training workshopCTAHR and its ag partners came together to advance sustainable and organic agriculture in Hawai‘i by hosting a training session for agricultural educators across the state. The Sustainable and Organic Agriculture Program (SOAP), WSARE, the Agricultural Incubator Program, and the Hawai‘i Association of County Agriculture Agents held a two-day training event consisting of research-based updates, a national perspective on Extension by the Western Region director of Extension, and a field day to demonstrate how CTAHR-generated research is being put into practice at the Poamoho Research Station’s new SOAP learning center. Educators received updates on everything from the importance of having a healthy start to post-harvest marketing of locally grown commodities. One participant wrote, “We have some amazing things going on here. Proud to be at UH Extension!”

Bugs From Afar

10/6/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Insect on leafThe distance education course “World of Insects” developed by Adam Tanners, Justin Hedani, Michelle Carino, and Eddie Gose, with Helen Spafford (PEPS) as subject matter expert, was ranked second by the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) for their Distance Education Crystal Award. This award recognizes “innovative and outstanding multimedia-based distance learning courses.” The team is invited to receive their award at the Department of Distance Learning luncheon at the AECT’s International Convention on November 1. Being such distance learning stars, though, they may just decide to attend the luncheon by Skype!

September



Magoon No Ka Oi

9/27/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Tom Apple and Maria Gallo at MagoonMagoon was a hive of activity last week as it hosted not one but two visits from dignitaries, first a group of legislators and then Chancellor Apple. All the new innovations and well-established programs were lauded by the admiring visitors, from Hale Tuahine’s aquaponics set-up to Joe De Frank’s turfgrass research plots, from SOFT’s student gardens to the work being done on anthuriums, dendrobiums, nematodes, and more. Chancellor Apple wrote, “Mahalo to all of you for making my visit such a wonderful experience. The work you are doing is incredible! I am so proud to be the Chancellor of the University that has CTAHR. I hope that I can help you and your fabulous dean achieve your incredible dreams and aspirations. I appreciate the time everyone spent this morning to give me a picture of Magoon and the great work that goes on there.” Sounds like he might have liked it!

Go With the (Blood) Flow

9/27/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Giving bloodBetter start eating lots of red meat—maybe some grass-fed beef—to get your corpuscles ready for CTAHR’s 2013 Blood Drive! You’ve got time; it’s not till Wednesday, November 20. If you want to donate or need additional information, please contact Sylvia Trinh, who’s coordinating the Drive, at 956-4162 or strinh@hawaii.edu. You’ll have to give her your first and last name, date of birth, email address, and a contact number, but don’t worry—it’s not as though she’s going to ask you for some blood…not yet, anyway. If you’ve never donated before, you can solve that problem: join the growing list of those who gave their very first pint at one of CTAHR’s Blood Drives. Long-time donors, come out and add another notch to your belt—or your vein!

Prime Meat

9/27/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Cattle at Mealani Research StationGet set to unleash your inner carnivore—Mealani’s 18th Annual Taste of the Hawaiian Range will be held on October 4 at the Hilton Waikoloa Village on the Big Island. There will be lots of grass-fed beef, not to mention mutton and lamb, cabrito (that’s goat), pork, and wild boar. And for those without an inner carnivore, the locavore in all of us will be assuaged by the myriad non-meat locally grown and made gourmet treats. This is an excellent opportunity not only to eat exceedingly well but also to talk with the farmers and ranchers who grow and raise that great-tasting produce and meat. There’s even a cooking demonstration for making the most of locally grown beef. Tickets are on sale now, and out-of-towners can choose a package that includes a hotel room. CTAHR’s not only one of the event sponsors; the college’s Mealani Research Station is where it all began, so it’s really a mark of school spirit, not gourmandizing, to check it out!

Frozen Fun on a Hot Day

9/19/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

25th Annual CTAHR Welcome Back Ice Cream BashRepresentatives from all of the college’s departments and administration vied for the top honors in the costume contest and ice cream sculpting competition at CTAHR’s 25th Annual Welcome Back Ice Cream Bash. Competing in this year’s contests were Ashley Perreira (FCS), Jinan Banna (HNFAS), Vincent Cleveland (MBBE), Erin Hickey (NREM), Jordie Ocenar (PEPS), Orville Baldos (TPSS) and Michelle Isaacs (Admin). Congratulations to Erin for winning the costume contest and Vincent for the most creative concept in the Western-themed ice cream sculpting and decorating contest! Everyone enjoyed free ice cream and popsicles graciously provided once again by Meadow Gold, as well as shave ice hand-cranked by members of the Sustainable & Organic Farm Training (SOFT) Club. Over $100 in monetary donations was collected to benefit SOFT, a CTAHR student organization committed to sustainable agricultural practices. Some of SOFT’s achievements include teaming with Noelani Elementary first-grade teachers to educate students on organic farming, coordinating campus food waste pick-ups, and creating and maintaining edible landscapes. Thanks are due to all who attended the Bash, the contestants, and especially to those who donated to SOFT. Big mahalos go out to Meadow Gold for its continuous support of CTAHR; Ryan Kurasaki and Charlie Nelson; Joannie Dobbs and the HNFAS and NREM departments for the usage of their facilities; Ray Uchida of the O‘ahu Extension Office and Lito Cacho and Richard Fisher of the Pearl City Urban Garden Center for tent coverage; and the strong-muscled ice cream scoopers. Lastly, thank-yous to co-emcees Angela Stein and Jay Gibson and the rest of the planning committee, scholarship recipients, ASAO, and everyone whose efforts made the Bash a success!

Feast for the Mind

9/19/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Worker measuring water to calibrate hand-held sprayer systemGet ready for the multifaceted “AgPro” workshop that will be offered on O‘ahu September 25 and 26. If learning is food for the mind, this two-day event is a banquet! The first day (8 a.m. to 5 p.m.) will be held at Hale Tuahine (the old USDA Fruit Fly Facility at Magoon, across from Manoa Marketplace). The second day (8:45 a.m. to 4 p.m.) will be at Poamoho Research Station and Hawaiian Earth Products. Offerings span from sprayer calibration (pictured) to organic certification; Korean Natural Farming to Worker Protection Standards; ornamentals to honeybees; and so much more! The primary audience for the workshop is agricultural professionals who work with growers, but all CTAHR ‘ohana are welcome. If you are planning to come but have not yet RSVP’d, please get in touch with Ted Radovich or Jari Sugano pronto, or let your mind go hungry! (And speaking of food, light refreshments will be provided, but lunch is for purchase, so plan accordingly.)

Fruits of the Retreat

9/19/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Strategic planning retreatWhether or not you participated in the recent Strategic Planning retreat, you’ll be glad to know that the group memory of that event has been compiled and posted. It’s available in the employee section of the CTAHR website, and it behooves us all to take the time to read it. It’s chock-full of optimistic and innovative ideas that when implemented will help make the college an even better place to work and learn.

Woodn’t You Like to Go?

9/12/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Items at Woodwork showHawaii’s Woodshow, a spectacular exhibition of local woodworking presented by the Hawai‘i Forest Institute, will be running through September 15th at the Honolulu Museum of Art Gallery at Linekona across from Thomas Square. The materials used are native and locally grown woods, and this year the Woodshow incorporates educational posters describing where the wood comes from and its significance. In particular, there is a special display of pieces crafted from young koa trees, rather than the old-growth wood that most furniture is made from. The Institute’s young koa project is testing out the market for trees landowners have planted or grown sustainably, and there are some lovely pieces on display and for sale. See some of JB Friday’s (NREM) photos from the exhibit here!

Tree of Life

9/12/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

The first-ever ‘ulu (breadfruit) festival will be held on Sunday, September 15, at the Southshore Visitors Center of the National Tropical Botanical Garden (NTBG). Kalo will also be featured at the festival, which takes place 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in Po‘ipu on Kaua‘i. NTBG is the home of the Breadfruit Institute, which is directed by ethnobotanist and CTAHR alumna Diane Ragone. The program features experts from Kaua‘i, Maui, O‘ahu, and Hawai‘i Island with cooking, cultural, and flour-making demonstrations and presentations. There will be breadfruit trees and cookbooks for sale; music; and keiki activities. Breadfruit- and taro-inspired, locally sourced food will be available for purchase. Interspersed throughout the program will be presentations by experts in ‘ulu, kalo, and agroforestry. The event is presented by Ho‘oulu ka ‘Ulu - Revitalizing Breadfruit, a project of the Hawai‘i Homegrown Food Network and the Breadfruit Institute of the NTBG. Its goal is raise awareness of ‘ulu as an attractive, delicious, nutritious, abundant, affordable, and culturally appropriate food that addresses Hawai‘i’s food security issues. Be there or go hungry!

Environmental Awareness, One Plot at a Time

9/12/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Junior Master Gardener and his motherNatalie Cross (FCS Extension) has written an article about 4-H vegetable garden projects in West Hawai‘i featured in the West Hawaii Today and Hawaii Tribune newspapers. “Birds and Bees and Butterflies, Oh My!” describes the 4-H Junior Master Gardener programs in Hilo and Kainaliu, in which children plant, care for, harvest, prepare, and enjoy eating a wide variety of vegetables. They learn more about the ‘aina and eat more healthily while participating in a fun, educational, and family-bonding experience. Many families have even been inspired to grow gardens at home after participating in the program, and lessons learned extend beyond the garden plot as well. If the next generation of keiki grows up healthy, self-sufficient, and environmentally aware, 4-H’s garden programs will have had an important part in making them so.

Unite for United Way

9/12/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Aloha United Way logoThe Aloha United Way (AUW) Campaign is underway and will run through October 4. AUW and the University of Hawai‘i O‘ahu campuses have set a goal to raise $400,000, while CTAHR’s goal is to surpass the $2,219 the college raised in 2012. To ensure the success of this campaign your cooperation and generosity are needed—it’s because of generous donors like you that AUW is able to make a difference in people’s lives. AUW supports over 300 partner, community, and non-profit agencies that provide education, poverty prevention, and emergency assistance to members in our communities. The programs supported through AUW help prepare children for kindergarten, keep them on a path to succeed in school, research health challenges, feed the hungry, care for the elderly and ill who need assistance, rehouse homeless families, and so much more. Making a donation is easier than ever with AUW’s e-pledge website—just log in using your hawaii.edu address and the temporary password auw2013, and you’ll be prompted how to make a pledge. Don’t worry—donations can also be made using traditional paper pledge forms; just ask either Robyn Chow-Hoy or Michelle Isaacs at 956-8234 or dean@ctahr.hawaii.edu. And they’ll also answer any other questions you may have. Just do it—you’ll be glad you did!

Retreat Means Think Forward!

9/12/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Strategic planning retreatMore than 40 faculty, staff, and students took part in a lively 2-day strategic planning retreat Sept. 10–11, led by Donna Ching and her expert team of facilitators. Participants represented various segments of the CTAHR ‘ohana. Dean Gallo (pictured at the head of the room) kicked off the process with a fun warm-up exercise to expand self-confidence for thinking forward. The group memory from the retreat and an overview of the process will be posted in the employee section of the CTAHR website within the next week or so, and employees are encouraged to view these documents to stay current with the strategic planning progress.

Chill Out!

9/12/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Frozen vegetablesSoojin Jun (HNFAS) just got a grant from the Agriculture Food and Research Initiative Foundational Competitive Grants Program, “Improving Food Quality and Value,” from the USDA-National Institute of Food and Agriculture. This project proposes to preserve the original freshness of fruits and vegetables, as well as possibly other food products such as meat, grains, and dairy, by controlling supercooling and ice crystallization of water molecules at subzero temperatures using combined pulsed electric and magnetic fields—nothing at all like the freezer-burned, clumpy frozen vegetables pictured here!

Heating Up

9/12/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Model of biofuel tanksSamir Khanal recently received two highly competitive federal grants on aquaponics, climate change, and bioenergy totaling $650,000. He was also selected as a DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service) research fellow to conduct bioenergy research in Germany this summer for 3 months, also a highly competitive fellowship given by the German government to an outstanding US researcher. Congratulations on recognition for research with global implications!

Flying Out of Harm’s Way

9/4/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Bird next to carChris Lepczyk (NREM) was interviewed for and quoted in an article in New Scientist concerning a study on birds and speed limits. Two Canadian scientists studied the distance from an approaching car at which birds took off into flight and discovered that on roads with higher speed limits the birds took off when the car was further away—regardless of the speed of the particular car. “I just think it’s really cool,” says Chris of the work—though he can think of other, more quantifiable benefits of the study as well.

Puttin’ on the Glitz

9/4/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Shu Hwa Lin and studentFashion Schools, a comprehensive online resource for information about fashion school programs and careers in fashion, recently judged CTAHR’s newly renamed Fashion Design and Merchandising (FDM) program (formerly APDM) number 52 of the top 75 fashion merchandising programs in the US, out of over 200 surveyed. The criteria for ranking consisted of academic reputation, admission selectivity, depth and breadth of the program and faculty, and geographic location. (Pictured here is FDM’s Shu-Hwa Lin with a student.) Fashion Schools also recently interviewed Ju-Young Kang (FCS) on the program’s highlights and local focus. According to Ju-Young, hot trends for the upcoming fall/winter season include metallic fabrics, including metal-foiled leather; two-toned furs; and mirror coating. Keep your eyes out for what sounds like quite a dramatic and scintillating season! Ju-Young also discusses the ways Hawai‘i’s distinctive location and cultural milieu influence local fashion—including, perhaps, a bit less two-toned fur.

OMG—CBB IPM!

9/4/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

CBB in coffee cherryThe LIFE and Risk Management Hawaii programs are partnering with the Hawaii Department of Agriculture to conduct a Coffee Berry Borer Integrated Pest Management Workshop and Field Day. It will be offered on Friday, September 20, 10 a.m.–2 p.m. in the Kunia Village & Agribusiness Complex Conference Room. Coffee and orchard crops extension agent Andrea Kawabata will be teaching farmers and processors on O‘ahu about integrated pest management (IPM) of CBB, from field sanitation to monitoring, prevention techniques, and first response. Rob Curtiss and representatives from HDOA describe HDOA protocol for first detection of CBB and what growers can expect if/when CBB is identified. Extension economist Stuart Nakamoto will discuss crop insurance policies available to growers for coffee and coffee trees. A representative from the Synergistic Hawaii Agriculture Council (SHAC) will also be on hand to give a grower’s perspective on CBB management and talk about SHAC’s program with growers on the Big Island. In the afternoon, Derek Lanter of Waialua Estate Coffee and Chocolate Company, along with Rob and Andrea, will lead a field walk through the Waialua coffee farm to discuss and show different CBB IPM techniques. Participants will learn how to identify CBB-infested coffee cherries to help with the early detection of this pest. There will be time for questions and answers after the presentations and during the field walk. Because space is limited to the first 50 attendees, a maximum of two representatives from each roasting or retail company should attend, to allow as many individual farms and entities as possible to participate. There will be a waiting list for additional representatives. Please call Gina at 322-4892 or email ginab@hawaii.edu by September 18 to make your lunch reservations (optional, $10 at the door) and RSVP (required). Water and soft drinks will be available.

Instructional Innovations

9/4/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Maria Stewart teaching a classMaria Stewart (pictured) and HNFAS are organizing Instructional Innovations. a brown bag lunch series for instructional faculty and TA’s in CTAHR, with meetings to be held on the 2nd and 4th Wednesdays of the month through November, noon to 1:00 p.m. in Ag Sci 219. The first one is scheduled for September 11, at which Jinan Banna and Rajesh Jha will share helpful insights gained at the Hawaii National Great Teachers Conference. The informal workshop series will allow participants to engage in conversation and share ideas about teaching and learning; each session will include a 20- to 30-minute presentation followed by discussion/questions. Other topics will include technologies to enhance learning, troubleshooting common classroom issues, and dealing with large lecture classes. Maria, the organizer, is the 2013 winner of the Frances Davis Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, so she knows whereof she speaks! If you have any questions, just email her at mstew@hawaii.edu.

Retreat!

9/4/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

FSHN Leadership RetreatFSHN Council will be holding their annual three-day Leadership and Diversity Retreat at Camp Timberline from late afternoon Sept 13 through noon of Sept 15. CTAHR students are invited to attend this retreat to meet, mingle and bond with fellow students; develop leadership skills and professional etiquette with the help of Dr. Lori Ideta (Assistant Vice Chancellor and UH Dean of Students) and Dr. Leslie Opulauoho (WCC); cook delicious meals with CN Lee (HNFAS); and enjoy the other fun activities planned at Camp Timberline! The fee is just $20/person, which includes meals, lodging, and activities. What a deal! The only catch is that the deadline to turn in your retreat registration form and dues is Friday, September 6. Email fshnnews@gmail.com for more information and a copy of the form.

Moist but Not Too Moist

9/4/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Moisture meterThe LIFE and Risk Management Hawaii programs are partnering with the Kona Coffee Council and their educational coordinator, Gary Strawn of Kona Earth Coffee, to conduct a hands-on, educational workshop about how to calibrate moisture meters. It will be offered on Thursday, September 5, from 6 to 7 p.m. in the Kona Cooperative Extension Service Conference Room at 79-7381 Mamalahoa Highway in Kealakekua. Bring your moisture meter and learn how to calibrate it to state standards! Hawai‘i law requires green coffee to be dried to 9–12% moisture, and it can be surprisingly difficult to meet this narrow range. These meters are used to measure moisture content of parchment and green coffee beans during the drying process. Too dry, and the coffee loses quality; too wet, and you’re encouraging mold. Not to mention that to manage CBB damage within the bean, parchment and green coffee should be dried to approximately 11%. The workshop will discuss the basics of how moisture meters work, allow participants to compare several types of meters, and have calibrated parchment available for testing. You can even bring your own parchment to see if your meter measured it correctly. Don’t have a moisture meter or need a new one? This is the perfect opportunity to try out different models. CTAHR’s coffee and orchard crops extension agents Andrea Kawabata and Ryan Tsutsui will be on hand to assist Gary during this workshop and will also help growers to calibrate their meters. Don’t forget to bring your moisture meter! Please call Gina at 322-4892 or email ginab@hawaii.edu to RSVP by September 4.

Fuel the Future!

9/4/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

BanagrassRichard Ogoshi (TPSS) will present a talk on “Biofuel Feedstock Crops for Hawaii” on Thursday, September 5, at 3:30 p.m. in St. John 11. He will summarize his research on biofuel feedstock crops being evaluated on projects funded by the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Energy and the Office of Naval Research. As you may know, the US Navy has pledged to convert a significant percentage of its fleet to plant-based fuels, so there is a large potential market for this important research. Come find out more about it!

August



Buy Local, It Matters!

8/27/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Derek Kurisu on Civil BeatCTAHR’s 2002 Outstanding Alumnus Derek Kurisu waxes passionate about supporting locally grown and locally made products in this Civil Beat news video. Derek, who is the executive vice president of KTA Superstores on the Big Island, explains that it’s a matter of working together and coordinating efforts, different farmers growing different produce so that more of Hawai‘i’s needs can be met without shortages or flooding the market.

Tilapia Sex

8/27/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Waipahu High School students holding tilapiaClyde Tamaru has been working with Jeff Garvey at Waipahu High School for the last few years to develop an aquaculture/aquaponics curriculum for high school students in his Natural Resources Production class. Clyde has also provided fish stocks for the systems and technical advice on keeping them healthy and happy. Now those tilapia are mature and large enough to form their own breeding program; that means selecting broodstock, and Clyde was asked to provide training for the students on how to distinguish the difference between female and male tilapia. “Not as easy as it seems,” he concedes, but the students were up to the task and now are adept at telling which is which. They’ve moved on to other issues in setting up breeding systems, including optimal male to female ratio, stocking density, and water-quality management. The class’s ultimate objective is for students to be able to create and improve any natural resource production system—a laudable goal, and one that Clyde’s help has brought that much closer to attainment. Pictured from left to right are students Josh Cabulera, Roy Vilaspir, Ronell Catajan, Kyle Marcelino, and Briana Banua.

A Directory for Every Desktop

8/27/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

CTAHR directory graphicThe CTAHR online directory has been updated, and the 2013-14 CTAHR Directory is now available as a downloadable PDF for you to print out or keep on your computer desktop. If you don't want to download the full directory, you have the option of two partial versions. One contains department/program information and employees by listed unit; the other is a single alphabetical list of all employees. The start of the semester is also a good time to update your biographical information and provide a photo in the online directory—you can do that here. Get your face out there, and make your accomplishments known!

Cone Snail Defense

8/27/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Zachary Bergeron with Jon-Paul BinghamEveryone is invited to attend Zachary Bergeron’s Ph.D. dissertation final defense seminar on Tuesday, September 3, at 4:00 p.m. in AgSci 219. The dissertation, titled “Peptide Toxin Bioengineering - Advancement of Fluorescent Probe Design for Targeting Human K+ Channels,” discusses work he has done with cone snail toxins in the lab of his committee chair, Jon-Paul Bingham (MBBE, pictured here with Zach). Zach’s other committee members are Abby Collier, Dulal Borthakur and Winston Su (both MBBE), and Robert Richmond; and they must all be justifiably proud of their much-honored student.

An Ear a Day...

8/27/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Horticulture Society corn sale graphicGet a jump on your daily corn requirement at the Horticulture Society’s fresh, juicy corn sale on Wednesday, August 28! The sale, held in the driveway between St. John and Ag Engineering, will run from 11 a.m. until all the ears are gone—and at 3 for a dollar, they’ll go fast! Crunch into some sweet—and locally grown—kernels!

FSHN Fishin’ for New Members

8/27/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

FSHN CouncilThe Food Science and Human Nutrition Council is now accepting new members for the school year! The FSHN Council is a club for intended/declared FSHN majors, but anyone is welcome to join. Come learn more about FSHN and future careers, network with other FSHN students, professors, and RD’s, get involved with nutrition-related volunteer opportunities, and make friends with other FSHN students! You can learn more about FSHN Council at their first general meeting of the year on Thursday, August 29, at 4:15 p.m. in AgSci 219. Visit their website to fill out a member application and turn it in to one of the officers listed on the application or at the first meeting!

Better Health Through Better Eating

8/20/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Woman chewing iceAbout twice a month, Joannie Dobbs and Alan Titchenal publish a nutrition, health, and fitness column in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser called “Health Options.” Last week’s article was headlined “Physical woes can indicate a lack of certain nutrients.” Have a crazy sweet tooth, crave salt, or can’t stop chewing on ice? There may be a nutrient deficiency behind that—check it out! For lots more bite-sized chunks of useful information, turn to their archive for a treasure trove dating back to 1997!

Social Network for Fishers

8/20/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Fishing boat with catch of fishMichele Barnes-Mauthe (NREM Ph.D. candidate) will defend her dissertation proposal: “Exploring resource users’ social networks and their role on environmental and economic outcomes in an ethnically diverse common-pool resource system: three essays.” The defense will take place on Friday, August 23, at 1 p.m. in Gilmore 311. Michele’s committee members are PingSun Leung, Kirsten Oleson, Steven Gray (all NREM), Minling Pan, and John Lynham. As Michele explains, “Effectively managing the current and unprecedented level of anthropogenic impacts on the natural environment requires a clear understanding of the components of natural resource systems and their interrelationships.” She plans to look at Hawai‘i’s longline fishery, exploring how the social relationships of the users of this resource will influence economic and environmental outcomes. In particular, she’ll look at the effect of ethnic diversity on the role of “social network capital” in this context, a factor that has not been sufficiently studied. Come for an eye-opening discussion!

Welcome to the ‘Ohana

8/20/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

CTAHR New Student Orientation 2013CTAHR’s New Student Orientation provides a great introduction for incoming freshman and transfer students to our college. About 40 new students attended this year’s program, where they received words of welcome as well as an overview of our four main values of instructional philosophy (Scholarship, Ethical Behavior, Diversity, and Service) from Associate Dean of Academic and Student Affairs Charly Kinoshita. Lisa Kitagawa-Akagi then discussed academic requirements, followed by short presentations by student club and organization representatives. Students were then divided into smaller groups, each led by our student committee members. Arby Barone, Nicole Castellano, Melissa Dumas, Kiana Ebeling, Angela Stein, Tiffany Ulep, and Kelli Zakimi led these sessions, which included Aloha Bingo, a discussion of personal development of various skills and competencies for life after college, and a question-and-answer segment. Groups went out on a campus tour and then came back for advising sessions for majors, where they received guidance on classes to take and what to expect in college from their academic advisors. The orientation ended with a delicious lunch with peers, faculty, and staff. The new students left with a better understanding of what it means to be a part of CTAHR. This orientation would not have been possible without the assistance of many individuals—a big thank you is due to the student committee members, faculty advisors, and student club and organization representatives!

A Bubbling Caldera of Knowledge

8/20/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Hawaii National Great Teachers Seminar logoVolcanoes National Park was the site of the 25th Annual Hawaii National Great Teachers Seminar, which HNFAS faculty Jinan Banna and Rajesh Jha recently attended. This international meeting brought educators together for a week of problem solving and sharing innovative teaching practices: the participants were the experts, sharing their knowledge with others in the group. The seminar consisted of a series of discussions in large and small groups related to various teaching topics: motivating and evaluating students, the use and misuse of technology in the classroom, maintaining academic standards, and more. Among the most useful activities was the presentation of “teaching innovations,” in which each participant contributed one strategy or activity used in the classroom to facilitate learning. Both Jinan and Rajesh brought back a wealth of information to apply in their courses, which they’ll also be sharing in an upcoming brown bag lunch.

More Lychee?

8/20/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Lychee flowersTPSS is sponsoring a seminar by Biyan Zhou on Tuesday, August 20, 10 to 11 a.m. in St. John 106. Dr. Zhou, a professor in the Department of Horticulture at South China Agricultural University, will be discussing the effects of hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide as stress signals on flowering and on flowering induction in lychee. She has published more than 30 articles in peer-reviewed journals such as Journal of Experimental Botany, Crop Science, Plant Cell Reports, Plant Growth Regulation, and Scientia Hortculturae; participants should learn important information on her research focus, the physiology of evergreen woody fruit trees.

Aqua-Web

8/14/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Aquaponic systemTetsuzan Benny Ron (HNFAS), in collaboration with Glenn Martinez of Olomana Gardens, recently posted at the eXtenstion Community of Practice for Freshwater Aquaculture website the second in a series of webinars on more effective aquaponics systems, including the advantages of airlift pumps. The efficiency and other benefits of aquaponics can be shocking—but you don’t want to take that literally! While many aquaponics systems incorporate a submerged electrical pump in the fish tank, there can be hazards associated with that set-up. The airlift pump solves that and other potential problems—and this webinar walks viewers through the specifics. You’ll also find Benny’s previous webinar introducing the concept at the same site.

Stockmen in Paradise

8/14/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Cattle at Mealani Research StationThe 2013 Stockman’s Fall Field Day Program will be held at the Mealani Experiment Station on August 30 and 31. Kit Pharo, a well-known speaker at livestock events across the US, will be returning for a second engagement at a Mealani Forage Field Day to discuss low-input, profitable cattle ranching. The program will also feature John Hewlett of the University of Wyoming and Jay Parsons of Colorado State University, who will provide details of the USDA’s Livestock Risk Protection Insurance program (LRP) and several USDA Risk Management Agency tools for managing risk for ranchers. Additional presentations and workshops will introduce participants to the UH CES and HDOA’s Cooperative Secusio extensa rearing program, which provides integrated management for fireweed by releasing the Secusio moth to eat it, and an update on the Kamehameha Schools Leucaena project. There will be a pasture walk and discussion about assessing drought-stricken range and pasturelands. Participants will have the opportunity to practice using various online tools to enhance ranch management provided by RightRisk and the Risk Management Agency. Finally, participants will learn about the “Hawaii Forage Production Estimator,” a new decision-support tool that can be used to facilitate grazing management decisions during drought. Pre-registration, which includes lunch and materials, is strongly encouraged.

Food Safety Beyond the Field

8/14/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Produce being washedJust pick your island of choice, and you can attend a produce post-harvest workshop featuring world-renowned Dr. Trevor Suslow, Extension research specialist at the University of California-Davis, and representatives from water-treatment companies. Also featured will be a brief overview of the USDA’s Food Safety Modernization Act given by Sri Pfuntner of the food safety consulting company Hartono & Co. And you will also be eligible for pesticide recertification credits! Each workshop will take place from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., with a bento-type lunch and water provided. The island-hopping schedule? Kaua‘i on Monday, August 26; O‘ahu on Tuesday, August 27; Hawai‘i Island on Thursday, August 29; and Maui on Friday, August 30. The cost is $20 per person; sign up here, and give your email address to receive updated information as it becomes available. Please direct all workshop questions to Luisa Castro, on the Big Island, at (808) 969-8261 or luisac@hawaii.edu.

Heirs to the Chairs

8/14/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Russell Yost and Mark WrightTPSS and PEPS welcome their new department chairs, appointed by Dean Gallo: Russell Yost and Mark Wright, respectively. Congratulations on the honor, Russell and Mark, and thanks for being willing to serve! The remaining department chairs—Catherine Chan-Halbrendt (NREM), Doug Vincent (HNFAS), Bobbie Yee (FCS), and David Christopher (MBBE), will continue their excellent service.

Sweet Thoughts

8/14/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Joannie DobbsNutrition expert Joannie Dobbs (HNFAS) is featured in a recent article on Discovery.com about the new generation of fruits bred to be super-sweet or otherwise especially appealing to kids, like the cotton candy-flavored grapes recently released by a California company. Joannie points out that that kids will readily eat fruit—even regular fruit!—and that even sugar-enhanced varieties have obvious nutritional advantages over candy, but that factors like convenience and shelf life keep vendors and consumers reaching for those chocolate bars.

Manoa Beauty

8/14/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Hawaii Hall, UHMDid you know that the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa made the list of the top 10 most beautiful college campuses in the United States? There’s still a lot of construction underway, but things are looking good!

The Roof Over Their Heads Is a Garden

8/14/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

TilapiaThe Star-Advertiser recently ran a laudatory article on the new aquaponic and planter garden that’s been created on the roof of the Institute for Human Services. The gardens, the article explains, utilize a variety of experimental techniques that are being worked out in consultation with CTAHR. The aquaponics set-up is particularly successful: only a month after planting, it is already yielding lettuces and other leafy greens for the guests at the IHS’s two homeless shelters; when the tilapia in the tanks mature, they too will provide food for the guests. There are even possible plans to sell the greens, if production continues well, and the shelter residents are also learning self-sufficiency and valuable skills by tending the garden plots.

A Caffeine Jolt of Funding

8/7/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Elsie Greco sampling coffeeThe continued menace of the coffee berry borer has recently led the USDA to grant $1 million in funding to research techniques to combat it, as highlighted in an article in Honolulu Civil Beat. The story discusses the particular problems the borer poses in Hawai‘i and describes the ways Elsie Greco (pictured), Ken Grace, and other researchers and extension agents are working to solve these issues. It’s funding, and work, that is urgently relevant—the future of Kona’s unique coffee may be at stake.

Full Plate for Farmers

8/7/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Operator demonstrating proper pesticide safety and PPELIFE is partnering with the Hawai‘i Departments of Ag and Health and the USDA Farm Service Agency to offer a Farm Resources Workshop that will cover a myriad of topics: pesticide use, including sprayer calibration and mixing demonstrations; on-farm food safety; lease opportunities; and loans. Participants will also be able to apply for a USDA agricultural cost reimbursement program to help offset the cost of transporting agricultural inputs and products. It all happens on Thursday, August 22, 6–8:30 p.m. at the Hawaii Agriculture Research Center: 94-340 Kunia Road, Waipahu. For more information, contact USDA’s Jason Shitanishi at 483-8600, ext. 104, or jason.shitanishi@hi.usda.gov. You can also ask Jari Sugano, at 622-4185 or suganoj@ctahr.hawaii.edu. Take advantage of this chance to get free food, lots of information, and 2 credits toward pesticide recertification!

Bug Brains

8/7/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Close-up of insect headEveryone is invited to a meeting of the Hawaiian Entomological Society on Thursday, August 15, 2:30–3:30 p.m. in Gilmore 306. Guest speaker Kirk Hillier will discuss “Picking the Insect Brain: Applied Chemical Ecology Based in Neural Approaches.” You probably won’t get too many invitations to pick insect brains, so don’t miss the opportunity!

The Chemistry of Aquaponics

8/7/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Aquaponics setup at Magoon ResearchZhen Hu, a post-doctoral researcher in Samir Khanal’s (MBBE) lab, will be presenting a seminar on “Nitrogen Transformations in Aquaponics” on Wednesday, August 14, 10–11 a.m. in Gilmore 212. Zhen will discuss the role of nitrogen in aquaponics, looking at the mechanisms and dynamics of nitrogen transformations in these systems. Come be enlightened on this relevant and under-studied topic!

Cycad Blues

8/7/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Cycad blue butterflyPEPS is presenting a special invited talk by Yu-Feng “Frank” Hsu with relevance to the topics of invasive species and rare-plant conservation. Dr. Hsu’s talk, “Cycad Blue: A Lesson on Plant and Insect Conservation,” will be offerend on Wednesday, August 14, 2:30–3:30 p.m. in Gilmore Hall 306. It concerns the invasive Cycad Blue butterfly, which damages endangered cycad plants in many areas of Asia and the Pacific. Dr. Hsu looks at the sources of the invasive outbreaks and considers the possibility that cycad species will become extinct, theorizing that if this happens the extinction of the butterfly itself may not be far behind. This topic is highly relevant to the Islands’ own fragile ecosystem, so be sure to find out more about it.

Not Just Ornamental

8/7/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Tessie AmoreThe college is recruiting for the position of assistant researcher in ornamental plant breeding in TPSS, and three candidates will be offering research and teaching presentations: Bunmi Aina, Adrienne Kleintop, and CTAHR’s Tessie Amore (pictured). Research presentations will be given at the Komohana Agriculture Complex in Hilo, at the times listed below, while teaching presentations will be offered in St. John 106 at Manoa, all at 1–2 p.m. All presentations will be available over Polycom to all county offices. For assistance with a Hilo connection, contact Kathy Aoki at 969-8201; for assistance with a St. John connection, contact Richard Manshardt at 956-6063. Dr. Aina, who gave her research presentation on August 7, will give her teaching presentation on August 8. Dr. Kleintop’s will showcase her research on August 14, noon–1 p.m., and her teaching on August 15. Dr. Amore’s research presentation will take place August 22, 11 a.m.–noon, and her teaching presentation on August 23. Come hear them and help to determine the composition of the CTAHR ‘ohana!

This Little Piggy Lived in Myanmar...

8/5/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Halina Zaleski in MyanmarHalina Zaleski (HNFAS) spent May in Myanmar as a consultant with Winrock International and ActionAid Myanmar to provide advice and training for small-scale pig producers. She conducted workshops on pig genetics and breeding, housing and environment, feed and nutrition, health, and management in several villages in the Pakkoku and Myiang areas (pictured). She evaluated programs and practices on larger farms that supply piglets to villagers. She also discussed challenges and recommendations with township and district livestock veterinarians and agronomists, and with the Pig Farmers Association. Among the key recommendations was the introduction of the 4-H program to Myanmar to help youth develop both academic and practical skills, because most village children receive only primary school education. Development of 4-H programs could provide opportunities for greater collaboration between CTAHR and organizations in Myanmar. Let's hope it happens!

A Lifetime of Achievement

8/5/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Naomi Samantha and Bobbie YeeFCS Chair Barbara “Bobbie” Yee has been selected for the James M. Jones Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Psychological Association, Minority Fellowship Program. She will receive this award at the annual meeting of the Association on Friday, August 2. The event will take place starting at 6:30 in the Hilton Hawaiian Village Beach Resort's Coral Ballroom I. She will be honored for her career contributions in ethnic minority teaching and training. She generously insists that the honor is also a tribute to her wonderful students (one of whom is here pictured standing beside her) and many colleagues across the nation. An award well deserved!

The Fashion Landscape

8/5/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Cover of Landscape Hawaii JulyAugust 2013LICH’s Project Greenway, a night of fashion and fundraising to raise awareness of native and non-invasive alternatives to common invasive landscape plants, is featured in a 4-page spread in Hawaii Landscape magazine. Adding a touch of haute couture to the event were APDM students’ fashion designs worn by local models; several of these designs are featured in the magazine, including Cole Lida’s elegant black gown gracing the cover. Project Greenway was also featured on KHON and KITV news; in the Star-Advertiser; on Nadine Kam’s fashion blog, and on HPR radio. Clearly an event whose time is now! CTAHR benefited from the event through more than exposure, as well: palms and dracaenas featured at the celebration, donated by growers through the Hawaii Floriculture and Nursery Association, are now beautifying the entryway in Gilmore. Thanks, HFNA!

Getting to the Root of the Matter

8/5/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

JB Friday showing tree seedlingsJB Friday (NREM) has posted a new YouTube educational video discussing containers for tree seedlings with four forestry and conservation nurseries. The size and shape of the container are important: larger containers offer more leeway in terms of time before the seedling has to be planted without getting rootbound, but they’re more expensive in the amounts of potting medium and water that they require, and the seedlings need to be planted in areas where large-enough holes can be dug. Holes at the bottom of the tubes encourage air pruning, so that the roots stop growing instead of continuing uncontrolledly. And ridges along the inside of the tube encourage roots to grow straight down instead of swirling around the inside of the container and strangling themselves. Find out more here!

Tea Lives

8/5/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Hawaii-Grown Tea logoThe CTAHR Tea Project and LIFE program are presenting a special event, Tea 101: Production & Processing Basics, on Thursday, August 8, 8:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m., at the Mealani Research Station. Randy Hamasaki and Stuart Nakamoto will offer participants basic training in tea production and processing and explain the tea research being conducted at the Mealani Research Station. Topics will include market feasibility of Hawai‘i-grown tea, basic types of tea (includes tasting), crop fertility and pest management, pruning and harvesting, tea-processing equipment, and evaluation of processed tea. Attendance is limited due to facility and event constraints to first-come, first served. RSVP to Didi or Perci at 887-6183 or ddiaz@hawaii.edu by August 7.

Malama Na Keiki

8/5/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Image from 2013 Kids Count Data BookThe Center on the Family, Hawai‘i’s KIDS COUNT affiliate, contributed state data to the KIDS COUNT Data Book just released by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. According to the report Hawai‘i ranks 25th out of 50 states in overall child well-being. The Data Book presents data on indicators in four essential areas: economic well-being, education, health, and family and community. Certain conditions for Hawai‘i’s children have improved since 2005, while others have worsened: the state is in the bottom third in the nation in terms of all economic indicators, such as children living in poverty or whose parents lack secure employment; on the other hand, Hawai‘i ranks 16th in terms of family and community well-being. We’re glad COF has the numbers covered.

Read Before Drowning

8/5/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Flooding streamChennat Gopalakrishnan (NREM) has published a state-of-the-art review entitled “Water and Disasters: A Review and Analysis of Policy Aspects” in the June 2013 issue of the International Journal of Water Resources Development. Based on original research, the paper presents a survey and analysis of water disasters globally during the period 2000–2010, including comprehensive information about economic losses and human fatalities. The author identifies and examines five broad groups of water policies—risk management, vulnerability assessment, capacity building and resilience, and the link between disaster risk reduction and development/institutional design—to determine their adequacy and effectiveness in successfully dealing with water disasters. Drawing on the study, a number of specific policy recommendations are offered to correct the serious shortcomings of the current policies. Five priority areas for future research have also been identified.

Sew It, Grow It, Blast It Off!

8/5/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

4-H students at rocketry day campThe 4-H program hosted three weeklong day camps at the Komohana Research and Extension Center this summer. The Ready, Set, Sew beginning sewing camp gave youth the opportunity to learn about parts and functions of the sewing machine and how to create different stitches. Along with sewing, they learned about the importance of accurate measuring and how to make and use patterns. By the end of the week, each of the participants created a pillow to take home with them. At the Green Thumb Gardening day camp, campers got to learn hands-on by planting seeds, propagating, and transplanting. Instruction also included the importance of drainage and nutrients. At the end of the week, each participant took home the vegetables they planted—tomatoes, beans, and strawberries. The third day camp focused on aerospace and rocketry, and throughout the week, the youth learned about the science of flight. They first designed and tested paper airplanes to demonstrate the concepts of lift, thrust, and air pressure, and by the end of the camp, each participant had built and was able to launch a model rocket!

Good Soil to Grow In

8/5/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Jonathan DeenikJonathan Deenik (TPSS) is one of a number of UH faculty who have participated in the Wai‘anae Malama ‘Aina Field School, a five-week summer program for eighth- and ninth-graders from Nanakuli High and Intermediate School spearheaded by the Hawai‘inuiakea School of Hawaiian Knowledge. The students have studied the geology of the mountain ridges towering above Waianae, learned about the importance of healthy living and the work going on at He‘eia Fishpond, and toured the research station on Coconut Island. Framing his lesson in terms of food security, Jonathan showed the class how to identify different soil types and how to figure out which crops will grow well in each type. The students will visit the UHM campus and the Magoon Research Facility on July 9 to get a taste of the opportunities the university can offer and, it’s hoped, spark the desire to go to college themselves.

Trees From Space

8/5/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Satellite image of vegetation on earthNASA/NOAA’s satellite product, on which Tomoaki Miura (NREM) works, is featured in NASA’s latest news. The “Earth-observing research satellite” named Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership, or Suomi NPP, collects all types of visual data on the globe, giving insight into everything from the amount of electric light generated by different parts of the earth to instances of forest fire, Arctic ice melt, and much more. Tomoaki’s project, entitled “Evaluation and Validation of NPP VIIRS Vegetation Index EDR for Earth System and Climate Sciences,” looks at visual data of the vegetation covering the globe. Being able to visualize vegetation is important for researchers into climate change, drought, and other hydrological and biogeochemical processes; it’s also got far-reaching implications for public health and land-use studies.

Luncheon of the Stars

8/5/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Sylvia Yuen with COF members at LeaderLuncheonA contingent of CTAHRites joined 800 others in honoring four women community leaders—among them former Interim Dean Sylvia Yuen—at the YWCA’s recent LeaderLuncheon event. Also on hand at the gala affair were Gov. Neil Abercrombie and his wife, Dr. Nancie Caraway; Mayor Kirk Caldwell; Sen. Michelle Kidani; Rep. Ann Kobayashi; and business executives from a wide variety of businesses. Sylvia and the other honorees were chosen because of their dedication to the community and the benefit of others, and because they are creators, innovators, and thought leaders. And cable channel ‘Olelo filmed the entire event, including Sylvia’s inspiring speech!

July



Aquaculture for Chefs

7/24/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Fish wearing chefHNFAS is hosting a Seafood Culinary Education Workshop presented by the National Aquaculture Association (NAA) on Wednesday, July 31, 9 to 11:30 a.m. in Ag Sci 219. This workshop, designed specifically for future chefs and food professionals, provides an overview of U.S. aquaculture, including methods of production, sustainability, feeds, environmental impacts, common and emerging species, food safety concerns, third-party certification programs, seafood inspection programs, new technologies, and important health benefits of increased seafood consumption. The workshop will dispel some of the misinformation and disinformation that swirls around aquaculture production and is an opportunity to provide science-based answers to any questions. Free parking, coffee breaks, and lunch will be provided—just RSVP by 5:00 p.m. on July 25.

Berry Borer, Kona Style

7/24/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Coffee berry borerCTAHR’s Local and Immigrant Farmer Education (LIFE) and Risk Management Hawaii (RMH) programs will be hosting two workshops on CBB Integrated Pest Management at the Kona Cooperative Extension Service Conference Room. They’ll take place on July 30 and August 7, both 1:30–5:30 p.m. Extension agent Andrea Kawabata and HDOA entomologist Rob Curtiss will be teaching farmers about first-response actions and the most current CBB Integrated Pest Management and sampling protocols; extension economist Stuart Nakamoto will be discussing risk management and crop insurance policies available to growers for coffee and coffee trees; and coffee farmer Bob Nelson will talk about the CBB protocols he uses. There will be a talk-story Q&A afterward. To register, call Gina at 322-4892 or email ginab@hawaii.edu by July 29 and August 5 for the respective workshops. And spread the word to other coffee growers!

New Faces: Mililani Isaacs

7/24/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Mililani IsaacsThe Office of the Dean is happy to welcome Mililani Isaacs to the position of office assistant. Mililani, a self-proclaimed “Army brat,” lived all over the world as a child and still loves traveling—dream destination, Rome! The proud mother of two teenage boys, she enjoys supporting their school and sports clubs, as well as volunteering for other community organizations. She earned her associate’s degree from WCC and is currently pursuing a B.S. in psychology. She writes, “I look forward in working at CTAHR and gaining knowledge in the many facets in the field of agriculture.” Welcome, Mililani!

HBT Takes Flight

7/24/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

HBT shooting invasive weedsThe paper on helicopter-assisted Herbicide Ballistic Technology recently published by James Leary and Linda Cox (both NREM) and their collaborators has been picked up by TV stations and newspapers across the nation! Locally, Hawaii News Now, KITV, and the Kauai Garden Island newspaper were excited to discuss this new innovation and its implications for local invasive species management. Other proponents are the authors of these Techline Invasive Plant News and SunHerald articles. Want to experience a simulacrum of the experience of shooting weed species with herbicide-filled paintball-type pellets? Just check out this video!

High-Tech Food Tech

7/24/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Natthakan and KaraKara Yamada, MS candidate in Food Science, and Natthakan Rungraeng, Ph.D. candidate in MBBE, who both work in Soojin Jun’s food engineering lab, recently won the second and third places at the Division Student Competition of the 2013 Institute of Food Technologists meeting at Chicago. Following the presentation and interviews, Kara received the $750 second-prize award and Natthakan the $500 third-prize cash award and recognition by Phi Tau Sigma, the Honor Society of Food Science and Technology. Kara presented “Multi-Junction Microwire Sensor for Simultaneous Detection of Foodborne Pathogens” and Natthakan presented “Development of Easy-to-Clean Slippery Liquid-Infused Carbon Nanotube Composite Structure Coating on Food Contact Surface.” Only 6 finalists were selected out of 76 candidates, and two were from Soojin’s research group! Not only that; Natthakan won first place in this division at the 2012 meeting. The Institute of Food Technologists is the primary international professional association for food scientists. This year’s annual meeting hosted over 20,000 food scientists, students, R&D professionals, suppliers, marketers and others involved in the food industry. Congratulations both to Kara and Natthakan and to Soojin for his mentorship.

The Triumph of Taro

7/18/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Visitors in Waimanalo Research Station taro field at field dayThe Waimanalo Research Station’s wildly successful Taro Field Day continues to garner positive notice—and hopes for a repeat next year—including a news video produced by Jeela Ongley of UH System’s Media Productions Office. The video touches on some of the sensitive issues surrounding taro culture and the culture of taro in the Islands, and it also shows how CTAHR’s work is appreciated by those on both sides of the divides.

For the Love of Livestock

7/18/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Calf at Hawaii State Farm Fair4-H’s participation in last weekend’s Farm Fair got enthusiastic TV coverage from both Hawaii News Now and KHON, with young participants and a leader explaining the learning opportunities and satisfactions of participating in the program and raising animals. CTAHR’s aquaponics was also briefly featured. Best of all, everyone involved, producers and visitors, looked as though they were having a great day out learning about local ag.

Going Ballistic

7/18/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Herbicide Ballistic Technology in action shooting invasive weedsA paper written by James Leary, Linda Cox, and co-authors, “Calibration of an Herbicide Ballistic Technology (HBT) Helicopter Platform Targeting Miconia calvescens in Hawaii,” was recently published in Invasive Plant Science and Management, and the journal also chose the paper as the subject of a media release targeting journalists interested in plant science and ecology. This publicity may boost nationwide exposure of the HBT technology pioneered by James Leary, which can target invasive weed populations in remote and inaccessible locations by shooting pellets of herbicide with a paintball-type gun from a helicopter. Sounds like fun…and it’s all for a good cause!

A Green Lite on Insurance

7/18/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Risk Management Hawaii logoThe Risk Management Hawaii program will be hosting two workshops on AGR-Lite crop insurance programs on Monday, July 29, at Pearl City Urban Garden Center. The guest speaker, David Green, is a retired employee of the USDA Risk Management Agency. The first session, 2:00–4:00 p.m., will be for non-grower agricultural professionals, while the second session, 5:30–7:30 p.m., is for growers. AGR-Lite is a federally subsidized crop insurance product that can cover losses from causes such as natural disasters, bad weather, and pests/diseases, as well as losses due to market conditions. Organic growers and direct marketers may be covered at market instead of commodity prices. Producers of all crops are encouraged to attend to learn about its applicability to their situation, what it takes to qualify, recordkeeping requirements, premium cost, how to apply, and similar questions. There’s limited seating, so email mddiaz@hawaii.edu or call Didi at 887-6183 to pre-register. For general questions, contact Stuart Nakamoto at snakamo@hawaii.edu or call 956-8125. Be there or risk being uninsured!

Bearing With the Berry Borer

7/18/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Coffee berriesCTAHR’s Local and Immigrant Farmer Education (LIFE) and Risk Management Hawaii (RMH) programs will be hosting two workshops on CBB Integrated Pest Management. They’ll take place in Hilo on July 22, 5:30–8:30 p.m. in the Aupuni Center Conference Room at 101 Pauahi St.; and in Kamuela on August 7, 5:30–8:30 p.m. in the Waimea Civic Center Conference Room at 67-5189 Kamamalu Rd. Extension agent Andrea Kawabata will be teaching farmers about first-response actions and the most current CBB Integrated Pest Management and sampling protocols, and extension economist Stuart Nakamoto will be discussing risk management and crop insurance policies available to growers for coffee and coffee trees. CTAHR’s county administrator Russell Nagata will be in attendance, along with other agents and government agency personnel. Feel free to spread the word to coffee growers!

News From the Lab

7/10/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Zachary Bergeron and Jon-Paul BinghamZachary Bergeron (PhD student, MBBE) was recently interviewed by KTUH (90.3 FM) about some of the research he is doing in the lab with his adviser Jon-Paul Bingham, with whom he is pictured here, and about his recent participation—and honors—in the ARCS symposium. Many congratulations on his ongoing, and well-deserved, recognition!

From Minnesota With Love

7/10/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Flowers at Hilo Farmers MarketCatherine Dehdashti, a communications professional with the University of Minnesota Extension, emailed a video she produced of her recent visit to the Hilo Farmer's Market. Catherine recorded some nice testimonials of CTAHR's Extension impact on the community. She writes, “My visit here has helped me learn more about the value of Extension.” Mahalo to Catherine for kindly sharing her video with her Extension 'ohana in Hawai'i!

Satisfy Your Curiosity

7/3/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

What is the outlook for the agricultural industry in Hawai‘i? Hear from expert farmers on the challenges and rewards of farming. Hear from current students of the GoFarm Hawai‘i program. Learn more about GoFarm Hawai‘i program, a comprehensive and practical training program built around the real-world needs of tomorrow’s farmers. It’s all happening at the Ag-Curious presentation on Tuesday, July 9, 5–8 p.m., at Hale Akoakoa building at Windward Community College. Register by emailing your name and contact information to info@gofarmhawaii.org or by leaving a message at 236-9265. Be there, or always wonder, “What if...?”

Not Just a Pretty Shell

7/3/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Jon Paul Bingham with cone snailJon-Paul Bingham’s work with venomous cone snails was recently featured on KHON News. The feature emphasizes the very real danger of the snails—when their tiny harpoons inject venom into their prey, it can be deadly—even for humans. But the deadly nature of that venom is exactly what makes it useful for pesticide applications and, in an interesting twist, curative drugs as well. However, the deadly nature of the venom may also be why his lab is the only one in the world studying the potential benefits of the toxin!

Life Begins With Livestock

7/3/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

4-H student with his grand champion lambAt the 56th Annual Hawai‘i County 4-H Livestock Show & Sale recently held at the Mealani Research Station in Kamuela, 4 steers, 17 hogs, 13 lambs, 8 goats, 4 rabbits, and 6 poultry were entered in the contest. Over 30 youth from across the Island participated in this year’s event, while Dr. Jan Busboom from Washington State University served as the judge of all species and as the carcass evaluator for the livestock that were harvested following the sale. Prior to the show, youth participated in a livestock-judging contest; the weekend was concluded with the livestock sale. Sale prices were high this year, with the average for steers at $4.85/lb., hogs at $8.10/lb., lambs at $10.75/lb., goats at $2.60/lb., and poultry at $46/pen. Many thanks are due for all the community support of the youth. Pictured is Cullen Andrade with the Grand Champion Market Lamb.

So That’s How They Do It...

7/3/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Animal Science students studying cow reproductive systemsUnder the watchful eye of livestock extension agent Mike DuPonte (HNFAS Extension), students in the ANSC 491 Special Topics class taught by extension veterinarian Ashley Stokes (HNFAS) learned about artificial insemination in beef cattle at the Mealani Experiment Station. Here Geneva Graef, Krista Ann Lee, and Kayleigh Morrison were able to review cow reproductive anatomy. HNFAS Department Chair Doug Vincent also gave them a lecture on synchronization of estrus during the weeklong intensive class, in which they gained hands-on experience in reproductive management of beef cattle. Besides learning artificial insemination, the students will be meeting with ranchers and farmers and seeing animal agriculture on the Big Island. Thanks are due to Hawai‘i county administrator Russell Nagata, Mealani farm manager Marla Fergerstrom, and the crew at the Mealani Station for being such gracious hosts, and are due as well to CTAHR for helping to defray the travel costs for these students.

Today IFAMA, Tomorrow the World!

7/3/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

NREM IFAMA teamA team from NREM placed 2nd in the Student Case Study Competition at the 2013 International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IFAMA) World Forum held on June 17–18. The competition, judged by industry representatives from Monsanto, Novus International, and others, this year featured 25 teams of students representing 15 countries who traveled to Atlanta to participate. The NREM team was comprised of Jacqueline Halbrendt, Cynthia Lai, Bikash Paudel, and Mary Pleasant, along with their academic adviser, Catherine Chan-Halbrendt. The competition was fierce, with agribusiness school giants such as Santa Clara University, Nanjing University, and Wageningen University among the finalists against which UH had to compete. With excellent critical and creative thinking, the UH/CTAHR/NREM team—who, having no agribusiness training, were by far the underdogs—came this close to capturing the grand prize! They and the rest of the top-notch contestants received many compliments, including from the CEO of Monsanto, Hugh Grant, who said future agribusinesses will be in great hands judging from what he heard and saw in the final competition. Kudos for a great effort and performance by the UH/CTAHR/NREM team!

June



Clearer Honey (Regulations)

6/26/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Governor Abercrombie signs beekeeping bill with Ethel Villalobos and UH Honeybee ProjectGovernor Abercrombie has just signed a bill, SB482, that will make it easier for small beekeeping operations to navigate or get exemptions from the complicated permitting processes necessary to bottle and sell their own honey. It also provides for food-safety precautions to help make sure customers get a pure and safe product. The regulations were so complicated and difficult to deal with before that some local beekeepers had even given up producing honey, so this bill offers a needed boost to the Islands’ bee industry. The signing coincides with “Hawai‘i Pollinator Week,” which recognizes the essential role pollinators—butterflies, birds, bats, and beetles, as well as bees—play in our food supply.

GMO on ‘Olelo

6/26/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Hector ValenzuelaHector Valenzuela (PEPS) will be featured today, Wednesday, June 26, on ‘Olelo as part of the local cable channel’s “GMO Week,” joining UH-Hilo College of Ag dean Dr. William Steiner and science policy analyst Bill Freese on an anti-GMO panel that along with a pro-GMO panel will answer questions posed by viewers. All the hour-long shows start at 6:30 p.m.; on ‘Olelo Channel 55 on O‘ahu and on Channel 54 on neighbor islands. You can also catch the shows online. The discussions today and tomorrow will be live; questions or comments by phone should be submitted by calling 834-5303 no later than 4 p.m. on June 27. To submit questions via Twitter, the community is asked to use the hashtag #olelogmo. Check out the ‘Olelo web page on this topic for more information on the coverage of this hotly debated issue.

Sharks Redux

6/26/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Michele Barnes-MautheThe study on shark conservation and ecotourism to which NREM PhD student Michele Barnes-Mauthe contributed, showing that sharks are potentially more valuable in the wild than harvested for soup, continues to get press coverage, including this segment on KITV featuring an interview with Michele. Congratulations on the recognition of your work, Michele!

Bravo for Taro!

6/26/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Jari Sugano interviewed about taro at WaimanaloThe Waimanalo Research Center has received a great deal of positive feedback from farmers and community members and who attended their recent Taro Field Day (check it out here). Over 250 people showed up at an event projected to draw only 60 to 100, a sign of work whose time has come. The Honolulu Star-Advertiser and KITV News (here’s KITV’s transcript) were on hand to document and celebrate the event, which brought CTAHR together with community and government partners E kupaku ka ‘aina, Hui Ulu Mea ‘Ai, Hui Malama O Ke Kai, God’s County Waimanalo, USDA, HDOA, Hawaii Farm Bureau, and the Taro Purity and Security Task Force. Organizers Jari Sugano (PEPS), Ted Radovich and Jensen Uyeda (both TPSS), station manager Roger Corrales, and extension agents Steve Fukuda and Rose Saito thank everyone who helped to create the successful event, promising, “We will continue to bring awareness, research and education to Hawai‘i’s taro farmers, communities and the public while being mindful and respectful of the culture and traditions here in Hawaii.” A lofty goal—firmly rooted in Waimanalo soil.

CTAHR Sets Sail

6/21/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Jensen Uyeda installing microgreens tray in HikianaliaCTAHR researchers and extension workers are collaborating with the Polynesian Voyaging Society to boost nutrition aboard their new ship the Hikianalia for their upcoming round-the-world adventure. CTAHR MBBE alumna Miki Tomita invited the college to help with her collaboration with PVS because crewmembers wanted to be able to grow their own vegetables. There were stringent space, weight, and energy requirements, and the system had to be designed so water wouldn't splash out in rough weather. Jensen Uyeda (TPSS Extension) created a prototype hybrid wick/hydroponic micro-green-growing system, here shown being installed in the escape hatch of the Hikianalia; also installed was a hanging soil bag for sweet potatoes, Jari Sugano’s (PEPS) design. Also collaborating with the PVS are Kai Fox and Clyde Tamaru (both MBBE), who hope to tap into the voyaging canoe’s power supply or install their own photovoltaic panels to power an LED array to help promote the veggies’ growth. The ship has just left for a year’s interisland “test” cruise, after which it will embark on its 3-year journey around the world. By that time the vegetable production system should be flourishing, and with it the crewmembers’ health.

Filipino Food for Health

6/21/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Healthy Filipino food project with Dr. WattersCorilee Watters (HNFAS, second from right) is the recipient of a $12K education grant from the Hawai‘i Department of Health Chronic Disease Management and Control Branch to develop education materials for chefs, dietitians, and health professionals on ways to improve nutrition in the diets of Filipinos in Hawai‘i. Funding for the project was supported by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Working with her on the project are recent dietetic students Erika Chinn-Galindo and Samantha Ordonez (left and right), who are providing nutrition and cultural expertise; dietitian and recent PhD graduate David St-Jules; and Lee Rosner (second from left), who offers a culinary and chef’s perspective.

Fountain of Youth

6/21/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

David ChristopherDavid Christopher’s (MBBE) work with undergraduate students to research enzymes that contribute to the aging of fruit and flowers such as pineapple and anthurium was featured in the National Science Foundation’s newsletter this month. These enzymes, cysteine proteases, are less active in unripe fruit and fresh flowers because of the enzyme inhibitor cystatin, but when they’re activated the aging process begins. The students learn how to sequence genes and help with the research into how to manipulate these enzymes so as to delay browning and softening. And since humans have the same enzymes, in whom they contribute to such degenerative diseases as arthritis and Alzheimer’s, the research also has important implications for treating these conditions. The project also provides research opportunities to university and community college undergraduates in genomics and molecular biology research, opportunities that are relatively rare.

Tough Tomatoes

6/21/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Puohala School visits Waimanalo Research Station; Amber Tateno presentsOver 40 elementary summer school students from the Hawaiian immersion school Pu‘ohala visited the Waimanalo Research Station, where they learned about active research programs including aquaponics, virus screening, and taro variety preservation. Here PEPS MS student Amber Tateno explains to them the importance of disease-resistant cultivars in managing tomato viruses. This variety trial at the certified organic plots at the Waimanalo Research Station is part of the WSARE-funded project “Low-input Integrated Management of Tomato Viruses in Hawaii,” awarded to Mark Wright and Leyla Kaufman (PEPS). The Pu‘ohala visit is part of a larger program of school visits to utilize the Station as a center for learning in partnership with local schools and non-profits, with support from CTAHR and the Castle foundation.

Waimanalo Lani

6/21/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Mazie Hirono and student group Ka Malo LaniA group of students from the Blanche Pope Elementary School in Waimanalo visited the Waimanalo Research Station’s experimental farm last month to learn and to meet special guest Sen. Mazie Hirono. The students have created a school and community garden they named Ka Malo Lani, the Heavenly Garden, where they grow taro and sweetpotato, and they got important tips about sustainable growing methods from CTAHR researchers, staff, and students such as Ted Radovich (TPSS) and Leina‘ala Bright.

Don’t Take the Shirt off Someone’s Back; Get Your Own

6/21/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Students wearing CTAHR polo shirtsNeed a nice, cool fashion option during the hot summer months? Pick up a CTAHR polo shirt complete with embroidered spirit mark, and your spirits will be high enough to withstand all the rigors of the summer swelter. The men’s sizes even come with the option of pocket…in which to carry your sunglasses. Now if only those also came emblazoned with CTAHR spirit!

Save the Sharks!

6/21/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Diver in shark cageNREM Ph.D. student Michele Barnes-Mauthe, in collaboration with researchers from the University of British Columbia and Universidad Autónoma de Baja California Sur, recently published a new study on the global economic value of shark ecotourism in Oryx – The International Journal of Conservation. The research team, who analyzed shark fisheries and shark ecotourism data from 70 sites in 45 countries, argues that sharks are more valuable left in the ocean than put on the menu. Their results show that ecotourism currently generates more than US$314 million annually worldwide and is expected to more than double to US$780 million in the next 20 years, while the landed value of global shark fisheries is currently US$630 million and has been in decline for the past decade. The authors argue that shark watching, combined with more effective controls on global fisheries and an added focus on consumer awareness of unsustainable fishing practices, could prove crucial for the future status of shark populations because it provides incentives for conservation. Check out coverage of their article in the popular press here, here, here, and here.

A Look at Hawai‘i’s Youth

6/21/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Family playing with blocks
Hawai‘i KIDS COUNT has developed an updated series of data snapshots on Hawai‘i’s young children (ages 0–5), children (6–11) and teens (12–17). The Snapshots present point-in-time data focusing on three important areas of child well-being: economic security, health and safety, and education. Data were collected from various sources, including the U.S. Census Bureau, Hawai‘i Department of Health, Hawai‘i Department of Human Services, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Hawai‘i Department of Education. Here’s a sample of the data that are included in the series:
• 8% of babies are born at low-birth weight (less than 5.5 lbs.)
• 28% of public school fourth graders do not meet DOE standards in reading
• 7% of sixth graders reported skipping school in the past 30 days because they felt unsafe
• 52% of public elementary school students receive free and reduced-cost lunches
• 11% of teens ages 16-19 are not in school and not working
• 62% of high school seniors reported that they definitely will plan to complete a post-high school program.
The publication is also available at COF’s website—check it out!

You Know You Wanna…Farm

6/21/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

GoFarm classGoFarm Hawai’i’s new farmer training program kicks off its next round with the AgCurious seminar on July 9, from 5:30 to 8:00 p.m. at Windward Community College, Hale Akoakoa building. Just register by sending your name and contact information to info@gofarmhawaii.org. The seminar is coordinated by David Ringuette, who can be reached at 236-9265. If this round is as successful as the last, you won’t want to miss it!

Multimedia Aquaponics

6/21/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Ted Radovich at aquaponics conferenceIf you couldn’t make it to the Aquaponics in Hawai‘i Conference, you’ll be glad to know there are still a couple of ways to access all that fish-information goodness. Segments of the conference for specific audiences will be airing on Olelo. Commercial Aquaponics in Hawaii will air on July 3 at 6:00 p.m. and July 8 at 10:00 a.m. on FOCUS 49 (only available on digital cable) and July 4 at 2:30 p.m. and July 5 at 11:30 a.m. on OAHU 55. Then Urban Garden Aquaponics will air on July 9 at 9:00 p.m. and July 10 at 12:30 p.m. on OAHU 55, and July 11 at 9:30 a.m. and July 12 at 3:00 p.m. on FOCUS 49. Can’t make those times either? No problem! You can also access the presentations here!

Banquet Benefactors

6/21/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Check presentation at 2013 CTAHR Awards BanquetA good time was had by all at CTAHR’s 25th Annual Awards Banquet on May 3: the 460 guests applauded—and waved signs for—the distinguished honorees, feasted on guava-glazed steak, admired—or grazed on—the living herb centerpieces, and laughed at the tribute videos to the Ka Lei Hano and Outstanding Alumnus award winners created by MC Derek Kurisu. It wasn’t all just fun and games and ‘ono food at the Banquet, though; thanks to sponsors and donors, CTAHR was able to present a check for $35,000 to the UH Foundation to create an endowment for the CTAHR Centennial Endowed Scholarship. This scholarship, which was first conceived in the year of CTAHR’s 100-year anniversary, will offer scholarships to students who are the first members of their families to attend college…and give them a chance to one day become Outstanding Alumni themselves. See more photos of the Banquet at the Flickr site created by Cheryl Ernst.

Hope for Scholarship Recipients

6/21/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Dick Bunker Hope Scholarship checkComing on the heels of the establishment of the CTAHR Centennial Scholarship, the college is now the recipient of another endowment, the James Richard “Dick” Bunker “Hope” Scholarship. This scholarship is directed to undergraduate students pursuing a degree in HNFAS; preference is given to those who are committed to community service, particularly those who have volunteered to care for people with cancer. One of the founders of the American Cancer Society branches in Arizona, Hawai‘i, Guam, and American Samoa, Dick Bunker was also an avid sailor who characterized his life as devoted to giving and sharing and who hoped to pass on these values to future generations.

Aquaponics Across the Pacific

6/21/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

ATOLL interns certificate ceremonyCTAHR hosted a special ceremony at which ATOLL interns from Rota, in the Northern Mariana Islands, received their ATOLL internship certificates with a specialty in aquaponics. As part of HNFAS extension, the Aquaculture Training On-Line Learning program, or ATOLL, promotes practical knowledge of fisheries and aquaculture based on technical expertise to people in Hawai‘i and other Pacific islands. Dean Gallo and HNFAS Chair Douglas Vincent conferred the certificates on the “Magnificent 5,” Dave, Harry, Jack, Gus, and Jimmy, while the ceremony was broadcast live via video teleconferencing between CTAHR and Rota so their families and friends, not to mention the mayor of Rota and his staff, could watch live. The mayor gave a short speech conveying the appreciation he and the people of Rota feel for the collaboration with CTAHR and expressing the wish that they might collaborate in other areas as well. In addition to the ATOLL online classes, Doug Vincent had invited the Rota interns to sit in on HNFAS classes, and during their 3-month stay in Hawai‘i, they were trained to build various types of aquaponics systems by Glenn Martinez of Olomana Gardens, who took them to many sites on the Hawaiian Islands to learn trouble-shooting. Dr. Barbara McLain, the ATOLL program director, also helped by training the interns in the use of software and the Internet and providing studying techniques.

All’s Fair at the Farm Fair

6/21/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Farm Fair logoThis year’s Hawaii State Farm Fair will take place on Saturday and Sunday, July 13–14, from 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. at Kualoa Ranch. It will offer fun and education for the whole family, including the 4-H Livestock Show and Sale, a country market, a plant sale, horse rides, good food, and much more. There's free admission for children ages 12 and under and full-time students with a valid ID, thanks to the title sponsor, HDOA, while general admission tickets will be $5.00. There will be ample free parking. Check it out!

Corm to Waimanalo!

6/20/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Organic taro growing at Waimanalo Research StationCome to the Waimanalo Research Station’s Taro Field Day on June 21 from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. and check out CTAHR’s Taro Germplasm collection. Learn about the statewide Taro Purity and Security Task Force, different taro varieties in Hawai‘i, new and innovative ways to grow taro, dryland taro culture, organic taro production, phytosanitation, and apple snail infestation prevention. Visit CTAHR’s organic taro collection and network with Hawai‘i’s agricultural agencies (HDOA, USDA, etc.) and fellow famers. Enjoy the kalo pounding demonstrations by Waimanalo community members and an afternoon in beautiful Waimanalo! For more information, please contact Jari Sugano at 622-4185.

IQ for Life

6/12/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Chelsie Smyth, Jessica Cheng, Jerico DollopacIn this year’s UH Saves Day LifeSmarts Challenge, Family Resources was represented by Chelsie Smyth and Jessica Cheng. Chelsie and Jessica were awarded gift certificates from the UH Bookstore for having the second-highest score across four teams on their knowledge of personal finance. The FamR team members, including alternate Jerico Dollopac, were mentored by Diane Masuo in FamR 361 Family Financial Planning to prepare for the competition. The winning team was represented by Shidler College of Business Fish scholar students, who each earned $250 scholarship prizes. LifeSmarts Challenge is a consumer education program of the National Consumer League. It is brought to Hawaii by the Hawaii Department of Commerce and Consumer Affairs in partnership with the Hawaii Credit Union League and UH co-sponsors—CTAHR’s Cooperative Extension Service; UHM Student Activities Council, Campus Center, Office of Undergraduate Education, Financial Aid Services, Student Life & Development, and Office of Student Housing Services; Shidler College of Business; and KTUH. Pamela Chow (FCS Cooperative Extension Services) provided leadership in organizing this financial literacy annual event for students at UHM. All of the photos from the competition can be viewed and downloaded here.

Visitors From Abroad

6/12/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Delegation from China with Dean Gallo
A delegation from the Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University in Yangling, Shaanxi, in China visited CTAHR on Friday to sign an MOU with Chancellor Apple and Dean Gallo. They also heard presentations from Kai Fox (MBBE); Tessie Amore and Russel Yost (both TPSS); and PingSun Leung, Jinzeng Yang, and Rajesh Jha (all HNFAS), as well as meeting over lunch with Associate Dean Charly Kinoshita and John Hu (PEPS) and over dinner with CY Hu.

Garden of Faith

6/4/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Carl Evensen planting gardenAssociate Dean of Extension Carl Evensen and a group of CTAHR faculty, staff, and alumni assisted Waimanalo community members in constructing garden beds at St. Matthews Church as part of the Department of Health’s Healthy Hawaii Initiative to promote consumption of fresh produce. They planted eggplants, kale, mint, oregano, and other vegetables and herbs. Check out the pictures illustrating the transformation of simple yard to incipiently productive garden!

Health Plan

6/4/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Brad Kurokawa and Corilee WattersThe Hawai‘i Department of Health recently launched the Physical Activity and Nutrition (PAN) Plan for 2013–2020, a plan that takes an inter-sectoral approach to improving the health of communities in Hawai‘i. Corilee Watters (HNFAS, shown here with landscape architect Brad Kurokawa) is vice-chair of the Community Design Sector. Its priorities include enacting policies that increase access to healthy foods, such as removing the general excise tax on fruits and vegetables, and reduce access to unhealthy foods. It is also working to increase the number of farmers’ markets that accept SNAP EBT transactions and identifying issues related to access to and consumption of healthy foods in counties across Hawai‘i.

Germs on a Journey

6/4/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Germ City exhibitExtension educator Rose Saito, with O‘ahu County 4-H, is collaborating with organizations to promote health among youth in the community as well as to provide community service and learning opportunities for UH-Manoa students. On May 24th, Rose and six members of the UHM Mortar Board National College Senior Honor Society took the “Germ City” exhibit to the Kapolei Elementary Health Fair. The exhibit offers a fun, interactive to way talk about germs, personal health, and wellness, core Department of Education Health Standards.

Big Apple Fashion

6/4/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

APDM 496 class visit to New YorkStudents from APDM 496 went on an exciting five-day NYC study tour led by Youngjin Bahng to see one of the world’s fashion capitals. They went on business tours of apparel and marketing companies such as Firmenich, the Knit Resource Center, Cynthia Steffe, Lost Art, Women’s Wear Daily, Fashion Institute of Technology, and Macy’s, illustrating lessons learned in APDM courses. They made time for major sightseeing spots, including a cruise around Manhattan to see the Statue of the Liberty, a trip to the top of the Rockefeller observatory, and a visit to the 9/11 memorials. They took in exhibits at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and relaxed with a visit to Central Park and the popular Broadway musical Kinky Boots. The group also had a chance to meet APDM alumnae Rita Blais (2008) and Holly Fujishige (2009), who have been working at apparel companies in NYC. Over dinner the students were able to ask them questions about living in New York and getting apparel jobs. The group returned with an increased understanding of the apparel industry and plans to use their New York experience to improve for their future practice, creations, and careers. They appreciate the funding support from FCS and CTAHR that allowed them this learning adventure!

The Start of a Proud Tradition

6/4/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

David St-JulesCongratulations to David St-Jules, who successfully defended his PhD thesis on the effects of the consumption of fish and omega-3s on pediatric liver disease last week—he’s the first PhD graduate of the HNFAS Nutrition program! His doctoral dissertation committee was chaired by Corilee Watters (left) and included Michael Dunn (right) and Rachel Novotny (behind David), both HNFAS, as well as Lynne Wilkens and Jeremy King (back right and back left, UH-JABSOM). Of his five research studies, four papers have been accepted for publication and the fifth is pending review. Way to go, David!

Flowers on the Road

6/4/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

AnthuriumsCTAHR and the USDA Risk Management Agency are excited to sponsor the 2013 Risk Management Floriculture Road Show on June 25–26 in Hilo. This Road Show event is also being co-sponsored by the Hawai’i Floriculture and Nursery Association. Day 1 will take place at Nani Mau Gardens in Hilo and will include presentations by researchers from CTAHR, USDA-PBARC, and UH Hilo-CAFNRM on such topics as plant breeding and insect and disease pest management on flower crops. Also included will be presentations on CTAHR’s Risk Management Hawai’i program. Day 2 will include a half-day of farm tours to see tropical flowers produced by local growers/exporters; then, in the afternoon, Arnold Hara (PEPS) will conduct a workshop on “Shipping Pest-Free Products to California” at UH-Hilo’s UCB 127. This afternoon workshop is free if it is the only portion of the event you will be attending. Registration for Day 1 includes continental breakfast, refreshments, buffet lunch (rock salt-crusted roast pork, grilled mahi mahi, boneless chicken, salad bar) and access to Nani Mau’s beautiful gardens. Because of the need to provide a head count for the dining services, you must register and pay by June 14. This Road Show event should prove to be very informative, while providing the opportunity to network with researchers, government officials, and fellow growers. Please call Kelvin at (808) 969-8211 or email ksewake@hawaii.edu for questions.

May



The Children Are Our Food Future

5/28/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Sprouting seedWant to sponsor a future food leader? Seeds for Tomorrow Summer Adventure Camp will be held June 17–21 from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. daily at the Hawaii Agriculture Research Center at 94-340 Kunia Road in Waipahu. The camp is being hosted by Hawaii Agriculture Research Center and sponsored by CTAHR, LCC, the Hawaii Farm Bureau, and a number of businesses such as Kunia Country Farms, Hawaiian Earth Products, Oils of Aloha, and Ali‘i Kula Lavender. But the cost to students is still $200 each, and scholarships are being offered to students who need them. Consider making one of those scholarships possible! It could do a world of good. Seeds For Tomorrow is open to all students from the 9th to the 12th grade who attend charter, private and public schools or are homeschooled. The students will leave with new friends, dirt on their shoes, and a fabulous new perspective on fun, food, and friendship: They’ll be interacting with the people making contributions throughout Hawai‘i, creating a worldwide stage of career opportunities from farm to fork. They’ll be developing, growing, distributing, and marketing a variety of farm-fresh foods. And they’ll be making friends with the creative people in the Farm to Fork process and fellow program classmates. Click here for more information, or phone 808.621.1361 or email Seeds4Tomorrow@gmail.com.

Coffee and Labor Law, Kona Style

5/28/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Hands picking coffeeUH-CTAHR’s Local and Immigrant Farmer Education (LIFE) program is partnering with the Kona Coffee Council (KCC) to present a workshop on labor law on Saturday, June 1, from 9:00 a.m. to noon, in the Kona Cooperative Extension Service Conference Room at 79-7381 Mamalahoa Hwy. in Kealakekua. Extension agent Andrea Kawabata and junior extension agent Ryan Tsutsui will be co-hosting the event with Dave Bateman, with guest speakers John Knorek of Torkildson Law Firm from Honolulu and Pamela Martin, administrator with the Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations (DLIR), Wage Standards Division. Both speakers will be discussing the federal and state labor laws that impact coffee farmers and processors. There will be up-to-date, informative, and detailed reference materials available free from the United States Department of Labor (USDOL), DLIR, and knowledgeable attorneys. Come for an in-depth refresher on federal and state labor laws as they impact the local coffee industry. You will have an opportunity to give feedback to both federal and state regulators on what is working and not working in the industry. For more information, please contact Dave Bateman, Heavenly Hawaiian Farms, at 322 7720 or by email at coffee@heavenlyhawaiian.com.

Feeling Sheepish?

5/22/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Sheep in fieldThe Hawai’i Sheep & Goat Association will offer a 1-day Sheep and Goat Care Course on Saturday, June 1, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Ohia Fields Farm on Kahana Drive in Ahualoa on the Big Island. Dr. Kim Kozuma, deputy state veterinarian and instructor at UH-Hilo, will introduce and discuss basic care for a healthy herd, while Ohia Fields Farm’s sheep flock will be available for demonstration and hands-on experience. Sign up and get directions online or call 430-3847. Registration cost is $20 for HSGA members, $25 for non-members. You’ve goat to check it out!

Malama ke Kalo

5/22/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Waimanalo taro fieldThe Waimanalo Research Station will present a Taro Field Day on June 21, from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m., to showcase the UH CTAHR Waimanalo Germplasm collection. Everyone is invited to spend an afternoon learning more about the statewide Taro Purity Task Force; different taro varieties in Hawai‘i; and new and innovative techniques for growing taro, including dryland taro culture, organic taro production, phytosanitation, and apple snail infestation prevention. Check out CTAHR’s organic taro collection and network with fellow farmers and Hawai‘i’s agricultural agencies. Visitors will get to enjoy the kalo-pounding demonstrations by Waimanalo community members as well. Come to the field day and get to the root of the matter!

From Albania With Love

5/22/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Cover image of book Agricultural Markets in a Transitioning EconomyCathy Chan-Halbrendt and Jean Fantle-Lepczyk (both NREM) have recently published a new book, Agricultural Markets in a Transitioning Economy: An Albanian Case Study, informed by CTAHR’s Albania/Hawaii Higher Education and Economic Development (AHEED) Project. AHEED, begun in 2008, partners with the Agricultural University of Tirana to help the university to better educate and advise its students and stakeholders to strengthen economic development and increase prosperity. The book also includes chapters written or co-written by other CTAHR faculty and AHEED collaborators Halina Zaleski (HNFAS), Brinton Foy Reed (NREM), and Interim Associate Dean of Extension Carl Evensen, on subjects ranging from Albanian research and extension services to Albania’s ag industry. Albania is in the middle of large-scale changes, and CTAHR and the AHEED Project are helping to provide the tools to face them.

Shining Lights of Leadership

5/22/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Sylvia YuenMark your calendars for Wednesday, June 19, when Sylvia Yuen, former Interim Dean of CTAHR, will be honored along with three other outstanding women leaders of the community at the YWCA of O‘ahu’s 2013 LeaderLuncheon. The theme of this year’s awards luncheon is “Shine,” so be sure to register for it now so you can be there to applaud Sylvia as she continues to do just that. The luncheon will be held at the Sheraton Waikiki Hotel from noon to 2:00 p.m.

Poster Pictures for the Rest of Us

5/22/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

JP Bingham at CTAHR/COE Student Research SymposiumDid you find the deluge of exciting, cutting-edge information at the recent CTAHR/COE Student Research Symposium poster session just a mite overwhelming? Well, here’s a chance to peruse photos of the session at your leisure, courtesy of OCS’s Cheryl Ernst.

4-H PR

5/15/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Zachary, Andy Smyth, and JadeTwo representatives of Hawai‘i’s 4-H groups are featured in Idaho’s 4-H State Newsletter. Zachary Matthews from East Hawai‘i and Jade Nakamoto from Kaua‘i are 4-H Ambassadors who recently attended the 4-H Ambassador Conference in Idaho and have nothing but good to say about it and about the 4-H agents and volunteers who made the trip and their continued involvement in 4-H possible. They’ve come back home with new skills and new ideas, and the renewed confidence to share them with their peers. The 4-H program also received some great publicity from Derek Kurisu’s cable show Living in Paradise, which details next month’s county livestock show and sale on June 14 and 15. This PR segment will run the entire month of May, but those without cable can also view the clip online (to see it, just fast-forward the clip to about the 6-minute mark).

Seeds of the Future

5/15/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

JB Friday and Jill WagnerJB Friday and Jody Smith (NREM) have just posted a video for the Hawaii RREA project in which Jill Wagner, director of the Hawai‘i Island Native Seed Bank and owner of Future Forests Nursery, discusses how to collect and catalogue seeds of rare native trees and demonstrates the techniques for processing them for storage. Ms. Wagner stresses that in forest restoration it is important to plant seeds that have been collected as close to the planting site as possible, ideally from the same elevation and at least from the same ahupua‘a. For this reason the seeds collected from each tree are given their own accession number. She admits that at the moment she is doing the bulk of the Native Seed Bank’s collecting, but she envisions increased community involvement in the process, an outcome this instructive video may foster. As a bonus, the slack-key stylings of Skip Bittenbender (TPSS) add a pleasing counterpoint to the information.

Scholar of the Year, and Then Some

5/15/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Zachary Bergeron and Cheryl ErnstZachary Bergeron (MBBE) has been winning awards lately. First there was the award for the best oral presentation by a PhD student in CTAHR/COE’s 2013 Student Research Symposium, then the Helen Jones Farrar Award in Tropical Agriculture from the Achievement Rewards for College Scientists (ARCS) Foundation, and this was followed by his being honored at the ARCS Foundation’s Honolulu Chapter 2013 Scholar Awards Banquet on May 6 as one of two Scholars of the Year. And he’s just capped off this semester of achievements by earning his PhD! Zachary, here shown with Cheryl Ernst, president of ARCS’s Honolulu Chapter and CTAHR’s new events/public information officer, was recognized for the strength of his presentation, the quality of his research, and the profound potential benefit that his work has for society. The techniques he is developing to screen peptide toxins from endemic snails to counter the carriers of rat lung disease has potential applications in pharmaceutical as well as safer pesticide development. Zachary shares the Scholar of the Year award with Jonathan Whitney, a doctoral candidate in biology who was recognized for his work using gene sequencing to document speciation occurring in reef fish.

Don’t Let a Knowledge Gap Keep You From Implementing GAPs!

5/15/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Risk Management logoThe Risk Management Road Show Series continues with its latest installment on the Big Island: Farm Food Safety Training with Good Agricultural Practices. Effectively managing risk is important to all agricultural producers, and having an acceptable food safety program is in the best interests of consumers, buyers, and farmers. This workshop helps fresh produce growers of all types learn about Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs) and how to write and implement an effective, farm-specific food safety plan. With the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) regulations to be in force in the near future, it’s never too soon to get started on implementing GAPs on your farm! CTAHR’s Farm GAPs coach Luisa Castro will also cover what most 3rd-party audit companies require. The training workshop will be offered at the following locations and times: Monday, May 20, 6:00–8:00 p.m. in the Waimea Civic Center Conference Room at 67-5189 Kamamalu Rd. in Kamuela (next to the Waimea Police Station); Tuesday, May 21, 6:00–8:00 p.m. in the Aupuni Center Conference Room at 101 Pauahi St., Hilo; and Wednesday, June 12, 5:30–7:30 p.m. in the Kona Cooperative Extension Service Conference Room at 79-7381 Mamalahoa Hwy., Kealakekua. Please call Didi or Perci at (808) 887-6183 to RSVP or email mddiaz@hawaii.edu.

Mysteries of the Sacred Lotus

5/15/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Lotus seedsRobert Paull and Nancy Chen (TPSS) with their research group recently published a paper on the sequencing of the sacred lotus genome. The sacred lotus, which is known for its symbolism of purity, its seeds’ potential 1300-year longevity, and its extremely waterproof leaves—not to mention its candied roots enjoyed at Chinese New Year—also has important research implications. The genome shows evidence of slow evolution, stemming from a low mutation rate perhaps caused by the seeds’ longevity. Some of its more effective mutations deal with extracting nutrients from its aquatic environment, the lotus being originally a land plant that then moved to the water. Robert Paull and Nancy Chen were involved in this sequencing project; their role was to analyze and annotate the predicted genes in cell wall metabolism and modification and to determine their evolutionary relationships. This effort follows from their earlier collaborations on the papaya and Asian pear genomes, both of which led to peer-reviewed articles in Nature and Genome Research.

Native Insects, Introduced Habitats

5/15/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Drosophila plantitibiaIt has often been assumed that most native Hawaiian insects have vanished from the highly disturbed agricultural ecosystems and invasive forests of the Island. This assumption was recently tested in a project led by Luc Leblanc (PEPS), curator of the UH Insect Museum and a member of the Rubinoff lab. Through surveys of endemic Hawaiian Drosophilidae, a group of flies with nearly 1,000 species, including 13 federally listed as endangered, the project revealed that species diversity and fly numbers were greatest in native forest areas, but half of the species also ventured into the adjacent invasive strawberry guava belt and plantation forests, almost 500m from native forest. More surprising, a number of species even persisted in orchards and nonnative forests as far as 10 km from native habitats. This suggests that more careful management of disturbed forest and a reassessment of its conservation value are in order. For more information, see the published article, and its associated online database.

FAMR Gets Wired

5/6/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Stanley Chen and Lena PhomsouvanhEvery year, Sony Electronics Inc. awards up to five sets of Sony VAIO Ultrabooks, HD camcorders, and other neat electronic gadgetry to outstanding undergraduate students at UH-Manoa. The awardees are selected by a committee appointed by the Vice Chancellor for Students based on several criteria, including academic excellence, need, and valuable service given to the community and/or campus as part of their college education. Impressively, two of the five UHM students selected to receive the Sony Technology Awards this year were FAMR majors: Lena Phomsouvanh and Stanley Chan. Lena, who will be the first in her family to graduate from college, volunteers at campus events, has worked with underprivileged minority youth, and currently assists elderly immigrants prepare for naturalization. Stanley has found his passion working with youth and volunteering in a cancer research study. Both plan to pursue graduate education after getting their bachelor’s degrees from CTAHR. Congratulations to Lena and Stanley for their superior academic performance and tireless voluntarism, and thanks to FCS’s Rick Caulfield for his strong letters of recommendation, which helped both outstanding students win the awards.

Advice for Advisors

5/6/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Cheri KauCongratulations to FAMR student Cheri Kau, who won 2nd place in both the oral and poster competitions, Social Science category, at UHM’s Spring 2013 Honors and Undergraduate Research Thesis Competition. And congratulations as well to her mentor, Lori Yancura! Cheri’s study surveyed UHM undergraduates to see if students who engage in life planning discussions with an academic advisor are more satisfied with the advising process than those who receive only academic advising for registration and career preparation. Results showed that those who did engage in life planning discussions with their advisors were more satisfied than those who did not. These results support developmental, holistic advising that focuses on assisting and supporting students in a multidimensional manner to reach beyond their graduation requirements. The Spring Symposium is sponsored by the Honors Program and Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program to showcase undergraduate research.

Food Education, Glorious Food Education

5/6/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Cyndy KahalewaleAt its annual conference on April 25, the Hawaii Dietetic Association honored Cyndy Kahalewale, Hawaii Foods project coordinator, with the Outstanding Nutritionist Award. The HDA also presented a certificate of recognition to Sylvia Yuen for her outstanding support for the education of dietitians in Hawai‘i. Congratulations to both these exemplary foodies!

Sustainability at Kamehameha

5/6/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Kai Fox at Kamehameha Sustainability FairThe Sustainable and Organic Agriculture Program’s traveling team of Jari Sugano (PEPS), Jensen Uyeda (TPSS), Bradley Fox (MBBE, pictured), and Ted Radovich (TPSS) participated in Kamehameha School’s annual Sustainability Fair. Students and faculty learned about sustainable, do-it-yourself growing systems such as aquaponics, hydroponics, and taro cultivation. Participants also learned about the story behind CTAHR’s ‘Anahu’ tomato variety, developed by CTAHR plant breeder Jim Gilbert and named after Bill Anahu (Kamehameha HS, 1938) who died in serving in WWII as a fighter pilot. ‘Anahu’ is remains a popular parental line of tomato hybrids worldwide.

Showing Fashion Flair

5/6/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Model from APDM Fashion Show 2013The 47th Annual APDM Senior Fashion Show, Zeitgeist, has been getting plenty of media buzz: it’s been featured on KITV News, in Honolulu Magazine’s fashion and lifestyle column Lei Chic, and on the entertainment website Nonstop Honolulu, as well as on the UH System website in a video by UH’s own Dan Meizenzahl. And the talent showcased in the event more than matches the notice it’s getting, with fashions ranging from futuristic urban warrior to retro-glam. Now, if there were only more events at which to wear such exciting styles—possibly next year’s fashion show!

Growing the Future

5/6/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Noelani kids harvesting vegetables at MagoonCorn and beans are the stuff of excitement and triumph as the Noelani first-grade students make their final harvest. SOFT volunteers have been mentoring the students all semester as they planted and tended their own garden plots at Magoon Research Station, in the hopes that their interest will extend to a lifelong love of and appreciation for growing and the land.

Graduation Sendoff

5/6/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

2013 CTAHR ConvocationOver 200 CTAHR students, their families and friends, and CTAHR faculty and staff attended the CTAHR Convocation in the Campus Center Ballroom. This intimate celebration, emceed by Lisa Kitagawa-Akagi, began with congratulatory remarks from Dean Maria Gallo and CTAHR Alumni Association and Friends President Dr. Susan Miller. Student marshals Roberto Rodriguez (BE) and Shelley Wong (FSHN), selected for their academic achievements, leadership, and service to CTAHR and the University, were then called on stage to be recognized. Afterwards, graduating students active in CTAHR-affiliated student organizations were acknowledged for their participation, and the ceremony concluded with the individual recognition of 52 new graduates. Following the program were refreshments and a chance for family, friends, and mentors to mingle with the graduating students. Congratulations to the graduating students for achieving such a milestone, and good luck in your future endeavors! A big mahalo to all those who supported the students: thank you to SAPFB for partially funding this event, to the CTAHR Alumni Association and Friends for donating lei, to CTAHR scholarship recipients and student ambassadors for volunteering at the event, and to ASAO for providing the CTAHR memorabilia presented to the graduates and organizing this event.

Getting a Bead on Weeds

5/6/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

HBT from helicopterEveryone is invited to the student design presentations for the BE 420 (Sensors and Instrumentation for Biological Systems) course taught by Dan Jenkins (MBBE). It will take place on Tuesday, May 7, at noon in AEI 123, the multi-purpose room at the back of the machine shop in AEI between Gilmore and St. John. The title of the project to be presented is “Integrated Datalogging and Delivery System for Herbicide Ballistic Technology,” and its objective is to automatically record locations of invasive plants targeted by herbicide ballistic technology during airborne operations. Thanks are due to James Leary (NREM) for providing ideas and funding for this project—as well as for inventing HBT in the first place! The presentation should be enjoyable, help showcase the ingenuity of our students, and stimulate additional ideas for collaborations. Food and beverages will be provided, but feel free to bring your own lunch as well.

GoFarm, Take Two

5/6/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

GoFarm classThe 2013 Go Farm AgCurious seminar will be held Tuesday, July 9, from 5:30 to 8:00 p.m. at Windward Community College. Register now by sending your name and contact number to info@gofarmhawaii.org, or call David Ringuette at (808) 236-9265. This is GoFarm’s second year, and by all accounts all stages of the first year’s class (pictured) have been a resounding success, so look for lots of enthusiastic participation in this program to educate and mentor beginning farmers.

The Wide World of Aquaponics

5/6/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Aquaponic systemAn Aquaponics in Hawai‘i Conference will be held on Saturday, May 25, from 9:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at Windward Community College’s Hale Akoakoa. Hear from Hawai‘i’s commercial aquaponic producers, urban garden producers, aquaponic services, and community groups about the challenges and opportunities of aquaponic operations in Hawai‘i. Learn from CTAHR’s faculty about the latest developments in aquaponic research and extension being conducted by the College. Provide input as to the role aquaponics should play in increasing Hawai‘i’s self-reliance and producing our own food. There’s limited enrollment, and registration is on a first-come, first-served basis; pre-payment will be required to participate in the conference. There are no refunds, but substitutions are allowed if the original person can’t attend. The Early Bird rate, available till May 8, is $79 per person for non-HAAA members, which includes a 1-year HAAA membership, and $64 per person for HAAA members or previous workshop attendees. After that it’s $99 for non-HAAA members, including a 1-year membership; $84 for members or previous attendees. Lunch will be included. This event is presented by WCC’s Career and Community Education, the Hawaii Aquaculture and Aquaponics Association, and CTAHR. For more information, please contact Clyde Tamaru (MBBE) at ctamaru@hawaii.edu.

Know How to Share Your Organic Know-How?

5/6/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

plant growingThe Organic Agriculture at CTAHR website has been the landing place for online inquiries about organic agriculture research and extension efforts within CTAHR for many years now. Now available within the website is a listing of individuals in the Organic Agriculture Working Group. If you wish to be listed at this webpage, please contact Jody Smith at smithjos@hawaii.edu by May 15th with your name, field(s) of interest, and email address. Participation in the group is completely voluntary, and responsibilities are limited to answering questions from the public about organic agriculture within your particular area of expertise. Help spread the green word!

April



Student Winners

4/30/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Winning Aloha shirt designThe results for the CTAHR Entrepreneurial Competition and the CTAHR Aloha Shirt Design Contest are in! Congratulations to all of those who participated in both contests and, particularly, to those who won awards: in the Entrepreneurial Competition, 1st place went to Stephanie Chang and Norine Ornellas-Walsh for the Herb n’ Worm Box; 2nd place and Viewers’ Choice awards to Robert Saito for his Kid-N-Garden Tub; and 3rd place to Mitchell Loo for the Rubbish Can-A-Vision. Chloe Rivera won 1st place in the Aloha Shirt Design Contest (pictured); Savannah Tatreau and Gabrielle Sanehira won 2nd and 3rd place respectively. The winners of the competition will be recognized at the Awards Banquet, so come give them a round of applause!

Three for CTAHR

4/30/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Creighton Litton, Tom Apple, Maria StewartThree outstanding educators associated with CTAHR were celebrated at the 2013 UH-Manoa Awards Ceremony. Not only were Maria Stewart (HNFAS) and Creighton Litton (NREM) (pictured with Chancellor Apple) honored for their excellence in teaching; Joshua Irvine, who got his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Biological Engineering from CTAHR, won the Frances Davis Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching for a Graduate Assistant. Josh, who is now in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, served as a student ambassador for CTAHR while he was with the college and also was awarded funding to spend a semester studying abroad at Earth University in Costa Rica. Find out more about the award recipients and watch the ceremony here.

Clothing Against the Flames

4/30/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

House on fireShu Hwa Lin (APDM) and her colleagues have published the results of an assessment study on firefighters’ needs for their protective gear, “Exploration of Firefighter Turnout Gear Part 1: Identifying Male Firefighter User Needs,” in the Journal of Textile and Apparel, Technology and Management. They analyzed the types of protection that the gear should afford and the types of movement firefighters need to be able to make while wearing it, and they even had recommendations about how to make the gear more comfortable. This publication resulted from research conducted under the regional project #360R (NC170): Personal Protective Technologies for Current and Emerging Occupational and Environmental Hazards.

Fashion Passion

4/30/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Dean Gallo with Fashion Show modelsDean Gallo praised the talent at the 47th Annual APDM fashion show, “Zeitgeist: Spirit of the Times,” that was staged this past Sunday at the Waikiki Marriot. The senior student designers looked to fashion eras of the past for inspiration, mingling this homage with a fresh, cutting-edge creativity that gave rise to such stunning designs as these Jazz Age looks on the models pictured with Dr. Gallo.

A Forest Grows in Honolulu

4/30/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Travis Idol at groundbreaking ceremony of ChildrenTravis Idol (NREM) spoke at the recent Honolulu Zoo Children’s Discovery Forest groundbreaking ceremony, which was attended by about 75 student volunteers, parents, and invited guests. Assisted by UH grad students, elementary school children helped to plant the seedlings that will form the basis of the Discovery Forest, which will be a representation of natural systems, creating a scene of Hawai‘i before the arrival of humans. The project, which stresses community involvement, will demonstrate culturally significant plant and tree species that once grew near traditional shoreline villages of O‘ahu and will provide habitat for Hawaiian plants, birds, and invertebrates. It is spearheaded by the Hawai‘i Forest Institute, of which Travis is president.

How Does Corn Know What Shape to Grow?

4/30/2013  Source: Office of Communication Services, CTAHR

Cornfield at Waimanalo Research StationDevelopmental corn geneticist Mike Muszynski will be presenting a talk on his exciting research on May 6th at 10:30 a.m. in Ag Science 219. Dr. Muszynski, of the Department of Genetics, Development and Cell Biology at Iowa State University, will speak on “Cytokinin signaling and leaf pattern formation in maize”: Pattern